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https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22

How is it to live in The Netherlands for a non EU citizen?

ManuAlvarado22
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Hallo!

I'm Manuel from Venezuela. As you may know, situation in Venezuela is quite bad now. I've always had the dream of living abroad, and nowadays, this is still my dream, but it also has became almost a necessity. That's why i have decided to try my best to finally making this dream come true and get abroad. And i've been recently in love with The Netherlands, what a beautiful country! <3 So, The Netherlands is absolutely the place i want to live in. But there are a lot of quesitons that come to my mind. I'll list the questions i can remember now: 1) Is it easy to get a residence permit once i'm in The Netherlands? I'll get there just with my passport. 2) Is it easy to find a job? I'm willing to do basically anything, like waiter, for example. 3) Is it possible to live (paying rent, eating, saving something) with a job like the mentioned above? 4) Is there any possibility of finding a job related to languages? I really love languages ):

Dank je wel!

1 year ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Skullclutter

Generally speaking, if you want to immigrate to another country, you need to arrange for the required permits before you leave your country of origin.

Here's the dutch government's page on Immigration. You should be able to find the information you need on how to get permits there: https://www.government.nl/topics/immigration

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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Thank you for the answer! I already checked the dutch's goverment webpage. But i don't have quite clear how could i get, for example, a highly skilled inmigrant permit if i don't not even an undergrad degree? ): I certainly think and expect to give good things to the country! But for now my skills are music (not in a pro or high level. Intermediate musician) and languages learner.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skullclutter

Maybe another category fits you better? You can, say, apply for a student visa and study to become a translator?

There also appears to be a type of visa for people who work in arts and culture : https://ind.nl/en/work/work-in-paid-employment/Pages/Employee-in-art-and-culture.aspx

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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Oh, i actually didn't even think about studying first to be a translator. You have enlightened me a little! I'll explore another options then. Thank you :' D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-ergens
Fire-ergens
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1: I believe that it can be pretty difficult for non EU/EEA/Swiss people and refugees to get a residence permit. You could try contacting the Dutch embassy in Venezuela, they should have plenty of information on migration etc. A simple Google search should be enough to find their contact information.

2: It really depends on where you decide to go and what you can do. The job market differs per region and your expertise. Supermarkets and delivery companies are almost always looking for new people but those jobs generally pay very little. I don't recommend it.

3: Wether you can live on minimum wage all depends on your choices. Certain cities and regions in the Netherlands are pretty expensive, others are cheaper. Invest in a bicycle for transport, that will save you a lot of costs. Generally, if you manage to get a decent paying job, manage to find a decently priced place to live and you try to avoid expensive stuff, you should be able to live from minimum wage.

4: Well, seeing as how you are from Venezuela; you speak Spanish. Well, nowadays people are pretty interested in learning Spanish as the importance of Spanish speaking countries within the global economy is rising, so if you were to get the proper qualifications for teaching Spanish as a foreign language and a NT2 (Nederlands als Tweede Taal) certificate, you could perhaps work as a teacher. There's certainly plenty of demand but I'm not sure about the specifics.

Good luck!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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Thank you so much for your complete answer! It could be a little bit discouraging but it's actually very rational.

1) I sent an email to the IND of The Netherlands, asking for information.

2) Well, the place doesn't actually matter that much to me, i would think about Amsterdam, Rotterdam or Den Haag first, but any city in which i can live and work will be great.

3) I could say i'm a very cheap person! I'll eventualy want to buy a new guitar, but it won't be expensive, but really, i don't drink nor like to go to night clubs or eating expensive food so i think - i hope - to be able to save as much as i can.

4) It sounds so great! I'll certainly need to get quite better in nederlands.

I apologize if this is bad or annoying, but, do you know anyone who needs a translator? Or anyone who could hire me for any kind of online job. I don't really have any way for earning money and any dollar is very valuable here in Venezuela.

Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-ergens
Fire-ergens
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"I apologize if this is bad or annoying, but, do you know anyone who needs a translator? Or anyone who could hire me for any kind of online job. I don't really have any way for earning money and any dollar is very valuable here in Venezuela."

No, sorry. Your best bet at getting an online job would probably be to 'get into the network'. Learn things, connect with other learners and experts on that subject, get those connections, hone them. Try to learn as much skills as you can. With the internet nowadays you can find plenty of free or low-cost resources for all kinds of things. Build an awesome CV, put it on Linkedin. Honestly, I'm no expert.

There is however a site that could be interesting for you as a Dutch learner (or learner of any language really). Which is Italki. I'm not that familiar with the site so I'll just leave a link with info. But I believe that by tutoring students in your language, you can earn credits which you can use to get lessons in other languages. You do have to have Skype (and a headset) though. Summary of a possible Italki strategy: Help people with Spanish (or any other language you are proficient in) - earn credits - use credits to learn Dutch.

Veel succes!

PS: www.npo.nl Here's the link to the Dutch public broadcasting service. You should be able to find a show you like there and it should be available outside of the Netherlands. Watching television and generally getting exposure is a great way to learn.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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This is an amazing amount of information. Thank you so much for all your help! <3

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rutger_W
Rutger_W
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The Netherlands is already a very densely populated country and with all the 'immigrants' from the Middle-East and North Africa trying to come over here to 'seek a better life' the Dutch system and population has become less welcoming to such foreigners. Laws and procedures are very strict. Because of the open borders within Europe lots of people come here for low-skilled work which often involves constructs that insure low wages and poor conditions. For as far as an affordable place to live, this is nearly impossible, especially in the large cities, because there are shortages and waiting lists. The Dutch are generally quite good in their languages themselves and I am sure there are people from Spain that can do the translations.

Good luck with the troubles in Venezuela. I am sure it will get better again if there are people like you willing to invest in the future of the country.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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Thank you so much for your answer, a very realistic one. And for your good wishes too! That's very kind of you.

That that you said about dutch people being good themselves in their languages is a very good point, also, the amount of spanish people that must be there could makes it even harder. I'll explore another options first, i have to admit that when i did this question i was too hype, now that i'm calmer, i can think better things.

Thanks again for your kind and realistic words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
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You might want to consult with a Dutch immigration authority (law office) to see what your options are.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManuAlvarado22
ManuAlvarado22
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Any idea about how to do this? :c

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
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Google lawyers in the netherlands who practice immigration law and give them a call. They will most likely speak english. Tell them your situation and find out if they can assist.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pentaan
pentaan
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How is it to live in The Netherlands for a non EU citizen?

1 year ago