"Ninaomba"

Translation:I ask for

May 24, 2017

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/billhatcher

Could this translate, "May I have"?

May 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gazelle1596

In fact, in many places across Tanzania, "Naomba" would be the word for "please", adding for any polite request - like your suggestion! :)

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dying_Star

'May I have' sounds more gentle. I think your answer is spot on.

May 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dying_Star

These are some of the words you're going to have to get used to. Tanzanians are more gentle with their language while Kenyans are more direct/blunt. Learn both.

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

Ah! And I was used to up-country "kitchen Swahili" which was rougher still. And my experience was around 30 and 50 years ago.. Thank you for this insight.

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanette.N.C

hmm, I literally took that as 'I am praying'... silly me

May 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/billhatcher

You're right. "Kuomba" is to pray, so when it is used to asked for something, it is asking in the most gentle, respectful, and prayerful way.

May 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

Yes, back in the 80s in western Kenya, I don't remember "kuomba" being used for anything other than to pray to God. We used "kutaka" for expressing what you want/would like. Ninataka ugali.

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanette.N.C

Thanks.

May 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinRasm1

"Ninaomba" is literally "I am asking for" (which is why it's related to praying). I can see that "Ninataka" is supposed to be "I want" and "ninaomba" the more polite "I would like" but it's not technically accurate.

May 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

Yes. It feels so weird, but the African Languages Swahili dictionary now gives the meaning of kuomba to be: 1) to ask, 2) to beg or plead, and 3) to pray! I guess it is similar to the old English in sentences like this, spoken to humans: " Show some mercy, I pray!" Only now, to pray is not the primary meaning of kuomba. Maybe I am not remembering correctly, but what I remember is expressions like, "Tutaomba kwako." We will pray for you. (kwa yako, abbreviated)

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinRasm1

Agreed. It's praying generally as in "tuombe" - let's pray. I think the asking connotation still exists subtly which is why it might make sense to say "Mungu, tunakuomba and tunakushukuru" - God, we pray to/of you and thank you.

May 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

Thanks, JustinRsm1! I just wonder why Duolingo would teach "omba" as the prefered way to say "I would like", if it is only subtly around with the asking connotation.! Oh, well. I am glad I am not the only one on here that remembers "omba" to be mainly "to pray."

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinRasm1

I actually think "kuomba" is a good, and most of all polite, way to ask for something. So I think Duolingo is right to have "ninaomba" as "I would like." It should just be noted that it's not a literal translation and the word can also be used to mean "to pray."

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gazelle1596

And also, again: In many (Tanzanian) places "Naomba" would be the primary word used for "please" - any sentence requesting something would (should) start this way.

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

O.K. That is good to know. Thank you.

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nia338575

Hummmm....so where and when should 'ningependa' be used....I thought those words were -also- more polite than 'ninataka.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MBG266009

"Ningependa" - I wonder if this is used the same way the literal translation is used in English: "I would love..."?

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis

It would be easier to learn this if there were just a skosh more context. ninaomba ugali, ninaomba maji. It doesn't have to be a complicated sentence, but it sort of hangs out in space this way and makes it hard to remember.

August 9, 2018
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