"Kijiko cha chakula"

Translation:A tablespoon

May 25, 2017

23 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danieljbuyinza

Hey guys, I think that I may have gotten it... You know how there's a Tablespoon, and a Teaspoon. And we usually use the Tablespoon for eating food, and the Teaspoon for the sugar that goes in our tea.

Well, perhaps here they were implying..."The spoon for food".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danieljbuyinza

In other words...Tablespoon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus.horn25

Thank you for clarifying, very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

What?? How could a spoon be filled with a meal? This doesn't make sense at all.

EDIT: Thankfully, this comment has now become obsolete.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leigh_Anne_

I think chakula can mean either a meal or just food generally!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

I know it can, but that translation was not accepted, and "The spoon is filled with meal" was the suggested translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

Up above, it says "a spoon of food" ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margamanterola

I've reported this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin633120

In an Tanzanian context, "kijiko" means a spoon you use to eat with or to stir your tea with. I'm sure the most sensible correct translation for "kijiko cha chakula" is "(a/the) spoonful of food".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babu-G

I suppose it could mean "A spoonful of food"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Coconuts_

But really everyone just says kijiko... Cha chakula is unnecessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

Just like in English. You usually just say spoon, except for when you need to be precise. In cooking, for example, when you need to know for measurements; or if you got a teaspoon, but what you really needed was a tablespoon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MfonUdoiny

"Cha chakula" sounds pleasant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgiaMul

he kinda just glided over that k didn't he. we out here translating the easygoinest laidback swahili styles. i feel accomplished


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phb2013

Does this refer to a spoon that you eat with, or a measuring spoon? Or could it be either?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

It's not a big one. Kijiko is the diminutive form of the word mwiko, which is a large spoon used for cooking. Kijiko is for eating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristin988397

Shouldn't it be meza instead of chakula?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/machieng

translations are not always that literal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1058abesolves

should "spoon for food" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninjagizmo

I'm here just to find out if "kijiko cha chakula" was referring to a literal tablespoon for cooking measurements, or for an implied serving spoon on a table. Serving spoon would = table spoon for meal - would it not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ef.13

The simple answer is that in Kiswahili it is understood to be a spoon for eating. However, the English culture has defined it more specifically, in that a spoon - is just a spoon ! [ FOR ANYTHING - eating, stirring or digging, etc.] AND a teaspoon or a tablespoon is for measurement. Save one - which is the iced teaspoon, but again Tanzanian's [ Africans ] generally don't drink iced-tea, much less have ice!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScorpioGir5

I could be incorrect but the audio sounds like he's saying vijiko.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maat_heru

Some things are literal and others figurative. Maybe a transliteration would more helpful vs a simple translation

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