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"Él llevó su coche a la casa."

Translation:He took his car to the house.

5 years ago

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Anitamich

I am also confused about the usage of llevar. Also it's one of those few verbs that I can't ever remember. Am I the only one?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LDuo1234

I feel exactly the same way. It doesn't help that I confuse llevar with llegar!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiddyGal

I also kept mixing up llegar and llevar. Now I always think of the V in the middle of llevar as a basket used to carry things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary586588

That helped me to think of the shape of the 'g' as a circular Hut with a small path leading to the door when you walk up the path you have arrived.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GinoPerez5

Llegar and lugar.to arrive at a place.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArrigoC
ArrigoC
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Perfecto. Gracias.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

Same here!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I thought the #1 usage of llevar is "to carry." But since one cannot "carry" a car, one "takes" it en inglés.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

llevar: to take or carry as in transport something,

to wear clothing,

it can be used to indicate the passage of time (used four hours shopping),

to overtake someone,

to take (guide, show) someone to a certain place, such as their room,

and it is also used where English would use I ¨get along with¨him very well.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rtlowry33
rtlowry33
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Remember 'para llevar?', often heard in California McDonald's.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Thanks, Robert! Memory tricks help me a lot - I kept thinking the opposite; "He left his car at the house." Duh!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

No, I am in the same boat. Llevar and llegar mean nothing to me, and even llamar and llover get in the way of understanding. Luckily I haven't yet encountered llagar, llamear, llenar, lloviznar, or yo lloraría.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonD108

To take, to carry, to lead. But also, to wear clothing. I've seldom seen it used as 'to lead,' but I remember it in that trio. It's easily confused with 'llegar,' which means 'to arrive' and is easier to remember

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

Me too.....ha ha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninonino1977

I'm with you, the same with llamar!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barry527413

I feel the same way. Whenever I see the double "l" beginning a word I know I'm in trouble.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilbPorter1

Mouse over llevó indicates drove is accepable. But was not accepted in my sentence.???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dennishamrick

I did the same thing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davies-Nick

Accepted 8/10/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cylam1

La misma aquí

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jobrown29
jobrown29
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Me too ... A bit unfair to mark the answer wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aerial312

That's what just happened to me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpmcguckin
jpmcguckin
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Same here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AhmedAbdul484783

El mismo aqui

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephrox
stephrox
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Same here

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L8rgator

Reported apr 16 2015

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newmilwaukeee

can someone explain the verb "llevar" please. I cant seem to wrap my head around it. It seems to mean a multitude of things and it's hurting my brain cabin

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylrrDean

Llevar kind of means "to have with/on you, to carry, to take" it's used for wearing clothing, carrying/taking something with you, taking transportation. Basically you can use it for Wear, Carry, and certain uses of Take when it doesn't involve subtracting something or depriving someone. Hope that helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

"Brain cabin." Love that. :)

Many words in English also have multiple meanings. Have a look at run:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/run?s=t

This entry has 179 definitions (yup, that's not a typo). We just need to accept that any given word isn't going to necessarily mean the same thing all the time, learn as many of them as we can, and try to work out the meaning by context. I find it helps to pay attention to the lesson subject. If you're working an adjective lesson and a word can be an adjective or a past tense verb, the sentence is probably using it as an adjective. We would normally get this kind of context clue from the rest of what's written or spoken.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Tylrr and Joe, yes, "brain cabin" is a good visual image - this forum lets some light and fresh air into my "brain cabin!" ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonD108

To take, to carry, to lead. But also, to wear clothing. I've seldom seen it used as 'to lead,' but I remember it in that trio. It's easily confused with 'llegar,' which means 'to arrive' and is easier to remember

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackYakov
JackYakov
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could be "he drove his car to the house"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabio_mucho
sabio_mucho
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In English this is almost the only correct answer. Yes, we could say that he took his car to the house, but that would not be the first phrase that most Anglophones would use.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaDunste
AnnaDunste
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Actually when discussing which vehicle to drive it is very common in my experience to hear 'we'll take my car' or 'they took his car' or some such. Less common when a person is driving their own vehicle and nobody else is involved.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariacecb

It did say that llevó could mean "drove" as well, so I wrote that, but it didn't accept it. What's the troll of that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kano717

Counted wrong for saying: "He took his car to the house." Did I miss something?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauricioRe400537

You said " Él llevó su coche a la casa". You have to say "Él llevó su coche a "su" casa", using "his" instead of "the".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Kano, there's a good place to use an idiom - "The devil is in the details"! Those pesky little words our eyes hurry past while our fingers type the (incorrect) answers! ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lobstermobster

... how about he brought the car to the house?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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¨To bring¨ is ¨traer¨: ¨él trajo el coche a su casa¨

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marleyblue

I typed "He brought your car to the house." and it was accepted as correct so brought works. (Although "the car" does not. "Su" doesn't actually indicate whose car it was, but some form of possessive pronoun like his car, her car, or your car needs to be used.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Can anyone give details why "he has taken his car to the house" is wrong and I see the same meaning "he took his...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

Both are "past tense", but...

  • He took = simple past
  • He has taken = present perfect

The "present perfect" is a compound tense..

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_verbs#Compound_tenses_.28tiempos_compuestos.29

.. unlike the "simple past", which is a simple tense.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Dario good link and thanks for the info. I wrote my comment some time ago and now I am working with present perfect & preterite perfect. My eyes have been opened to grammar I had long forgotten. The fact that Spanish handles things a little differently adds to the challenge. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoarieG

This will give you the simple definitions of llevar: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/llevo This will give you all the ways to conjugate: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/llevo I hope this helps. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zzwineaux

I did "drove" too & it was counted wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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I used "drove" which was in the dropdown menu. It was not accepted. Does this mean he had his car towed or pushed to the house?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nate287775

I still get confused by how we know who su is. I mean, couldnt this be a response to "dude, where's my car?" aaron llevo su coche a la casa. Vamos tambien. Podemos usar a mio.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacuwe
Hacuwe
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"Su" can be his (own) or her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thomashester2

I thought llevó meant wore and it means took now?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044
norma0044
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I was just given the "Correct" answer as being He led his cart home ???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

Admittedly, I got this totally wrong but I CANNOT accept DL's "he LED his car to the house" as a correct version. The mind boggles. I suppose it could be correct if he was a funeral director walking in front of a hearse or, indeed, if he had it on a leading rein like a horse!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

llevar can be used when someone ¨took you to your hotel room¨. I have been told that the hints are actually based on searches against that particular word and not what question you are being asked in DL

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alice724457

Why isn't it "el tomo su coche a la casa"? (sorry I can't type accents) I thought you had to use tomar for modes of transport...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rknoops
rknoops
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How would you say: "He took the car at his house"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"Tomó el coche en su casa" according to google translator. It is possible google is using the wrong "took". "Llevó el coche en su casa"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jimmy232Neiman

my question is what was the action. does this mean that he drove his car to the house because he was visiting the house, or did he take the car there to leave for it some reason. because the later is the only instance where I would use took. Other wise for me he drove to the house. If you leave of the house bit then I can see using he took the car. as in where is the car? bob took it. its not about the English I just want to know when the stricter is apropriate

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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Have you ever taken a bus? Did you leave the bus at the place you went in it or did the bus driver drive away?

How did you get there? I took my car, I drove my car, I went in my car, I traveled by car...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

He took his car rather than another mode of transport

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitkunnie
kitkunnie
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How could he take the car? He couldn't, at least in English!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/horvathdavid

Question: How did you get here? Answer: I took my/the car, bus, bike

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4

well! That statement just takes the cake! It took my breath clean away because many times I have ´taken´ my car somewhere instead of ´going by foot´, ´riding/ taking / going by´bike or ´catching/ taking´ the train. On these occasions I ´took´ my car AND I ´drove´ it at the exact same time. Sometimes we, as a family, ´have taken´ a vehicle in for repairs and we were inside it at the same time although only one person actually ´drove´ it. And when a friend and I decide to double up so that both of us ´will go in´ one car I always suggest that we ´take´ mine.

Most languages have multiple ways of saying things depending on what shades of emphasis and meaning you want to include.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kibod

uh drove the car seems reasonable

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

Can anyone tell me why the "personal a" was used here please. Not quite got the hang of that yet. I thought it was if you were talking about close people or pets, not houses.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teopap2
teopap2
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It is not the personal a. The phrase ' a la casa' is not the object ('su coche' is the object, which is not a person etc. so we don't say 'a su coche' instead); it just shows the direction/destination, so 'a' here means 'to'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulinabrava

He drove his car home. 1 june 2015 = is correct!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spisal

i got 'he took your car to the house' correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpaceC
SpaceC
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I normally leave it in the garage, but whatever. I can leave it in my lounge.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corlan3

Llevó, past tense for carry. So took it ,delivered it ,brought it , should be acceptable

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kel800506
Kel800506
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Unfair to mark wrong for use of "their" over "her" as gender of car's owner is not specifically mentioned!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpmcguckin
jpmcguckin
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"Their" would be improper grammar in English, too. "He" or "she" are singular, so the use of a plural possessive rather than a singular one would be incorrect.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teopap2
teopap2
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It isn't necessary in English that the possessive must be singular whenever the subject is singular. E.g. "Her daughter and son-in-law where both too busy, so she took their son from school".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

I think I'm having trouble with the "LL" sound. I thought I heard ""Él dejó su coche a la casa." "He left his car at the house." Oi.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nitish167157

Segun google, llevo=i wear y lleva=carries. Now, wats going on here. No idea!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpatkat

Llevo una camisa y se lleva mis pantalones cuando ella llevo mi coche a casa?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bobbie450247

Bahaha! First the translation said he carried his car to the house. Then it said he led his car to the house. What...on a leash? I am frustrated but laughing. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George666445

"He went his car to the house. " This does not sound English at all

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanoRoelvi
DanoRoelvi
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To lead a car home is not english

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaladinLife

Should it help anyone remember. "Coche" probably stems from the days when people took "coaches". I was confused since the only Spanish word I knew before this lesson, in regards to "car", was "carro". I knew some (broken) spanish before starting these lessons, due to growing up in Miami, surrounded by Cubans. And having taken 2 years of Spanish in highschool. C/o.2011.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

How does a verb that means to carry, transport, wear end up meaning took. I just don't see it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevenTinc

The correction read, "He led his car to the house." Did he put a bit in its mouth?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tony979198
Tony979198
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Why couldn't it mean: "he brought his car to the house"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahaminOz

"He carried his car to the house" is marked correct! Strong guy!

3 weeks ago