https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charamei

Gendering pets, affection, and could somebody check my composition practice?

So I was doing some composition practice about my new cat (I got him last Thursday: he is lovely), and it occurred to me that, well... he's male. And 'cat' is feminine.

Does this matter? Is there a separate word for 'tomcat' (i.e. a male cat) that I could use instead? And if I'm not directly using the word 'cat', would it be reasonable to switch pronouns or not?

Also, what is the word for 'affectionate'? Google Translate gave me 'στόργικος', but has then variously backtranslated that as 'oral', 'tortuous' and 'ornate', so I'm not convinced it knows what it's talking about!

Here's my complete, very basic, exercise. Google thinks it's mostly okay, but again, Google seems to be messing with me today: Έχω μία νέα γάτα. Το όνομα της είναι Μπράξιατελ. Είναι ασπρόμαυρα. Άπολαμβάνει να τρώει. Έχει δύο χρονών. Είναι πολύ στόργικος. Είναι μία καλή γάτα. Της αγάπω.

May 29, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod

    You can say 'ο γάτος' for a male cat and then use masculine pronouns/adjectives etc to describe him. For example, 'στοργικός' (which means 'affectionate' indeed - drop Google and try wordreference.com ) is the masculine form but everything else you've used is feminine.

    Very good effort for your short writing exercise, you've made very few mistakes and it makes perfect sense! Pay attention to where the accents go and remember that in Greek someone is x years old, like in English. ('has x years' always trips me up in French and Spanish :)

    So, for μια γάτα:

    Έχω μία νέα γάτα. Το όνομά της είναι Μπράξιατελ. Είναι ασπρόμαυρη. Απολαμβάνει να τρώει. Είναι δύο χρονών. Είναι πολύ στοργική. Είναι μία καλή γάτα. Την αγαπώ.

    May 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charamei

    Ευχαριστώ! I originally had στοργικά, but Google translated the line back as 'she is politely oral' and I couldn't stop laughing! I'll remember the eta next time :)

    Is όνομά supposed to have two accents, or is that a typo on your part? I was always told no word in Greek had two (and I see my own proofreading let me down on that with απολαμβάνει), but that was for Ancient, so...?

    And ah, ages. This is what I get for jumping ahead of the course ;)

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
    Mod
    • 1018

    RE the double tonos, it's not a typo. Basically, the tonos can never be more than three syllables back from the end of the word. If a pronoun follows a noun, it essentially becomes another syllable of the preceding word - you know how fast Greeks talk, right? ;-) But that negates the 'no more than three syllables back' rule. So the additional tonos goes there sort of to help break things up a bit when the words are spoken and also to maintain the grammatical rule that the tonos can't be more than three syllables back from the end of the word.

    The current tree doesn't really cover this properly, but I believe the new tree will require correct second tonos placement when they are required.

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
    Mod
    • 1018

    Oh, and you'll start coming across words that have both a tonos and a dialutika (diaeresis) sooner or later, too. I think λαϊκή makes an appearance in the Duo tree somewhere fairly early on.

    Aside from in those two situations, there will only ever be one tonos in a word, yes.

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charamei

    Ah, that makes sense, thank you!

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
    Mod
    • 1018

    You're welcome!

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

    Nice try! Not bad at all. About genders D_ has already corrected some mistakes. About using the verb είναι and έχω, απολαμβάνει. Well, some varieties, not using this verb all the time, in all sentences, some notices. Είναι shows a property that someone has, as it is the color, the age, a characteristic, and it usually goes with an adjective. Έχω in Greek means posession mostly and is used with some tenses of the past as it is in English with the Modern Greek infinitive, so έχω γράψει, I have written.

    Instead using the verb απολαμβάνει, more common is to use the verb μου αρέσει, I like, so της αρέσει να τρώει, notice this να in both cases. The object is in accusative mostly, just a few are in genitive, so την αγαπώ.

    Anyway, not bad, every Greek can understand that meaning very well, Greek include more information in phrases than English and this surplus makes the phrases fully understandable.

    May 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charamei

    Ευχαριστώ! Είμαι vs έχω always trips me up >.< I'll keep working on it. And thank you for μου αρέσει - I'll stop using old dictionaries now. Promise.

    May 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

    Yes, the same to me with these verbs in French for instance, Italian is more difficult to use these verbs.

    In Greek: Έχω 20 χρόνια, to say I am 20 years old, is quite odd, instead of the correct είμαι 20 χρονών, where the noun άνθρωπος or similar omitted.

    Also the present perfect of energetic voice always uses έχω, so έχω γράψει, I have written. In the other hand είμαι+past participle of passive voice, είμαι γραμμένος, I am written.

    Not far away from the English language logic.

    May 30, 2017
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