https://www.duolingo.com/matteo449299

What did you do to continue your language learning after you completed the tree?

Curious as to what others did to continue their target language after they completed their tree(s)?

Edit: And what did you find to be effective or not.

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JessikaMorgan

I still have a checkpoint or two till I finish the Hebrew tree, but I'm already getting started on reading graded readers for the very young. Surprisingly, I'm doing pretty well. Once I get finished with Duo it'll be more of the same, I think. Consuming media like there is a shortage coming on.

Read books, listen to music, or watch TV/movies in your target language. If you live in a place where you can find native speakers, go try out your language skills on them.

Other than that, follow Instagram accounts in the language you are learning and translate what they say, or Youtube videos where the vloggers are speaking your new language (cars, makeup, knitting, the options are endless). Make some new facebook friends.

While I haven't technically finished my tree, I'm already getting started on all this and I can see where it's making a difference already. I don't get a lot of listening practice on Duolingo, or reading, and I'm seeing my recognition skills improving at a steady pace.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia822632

I like clozemaster, should probably use it more.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob20020
Bob20020
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I watch youtube

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia822632

Memrise helps you add more vocabulary, but doesn't really help put it together. Reviewing Duolingo does help but you need more to continue growing.

I read, although finding content at the right level when I first finished my tree took a bit. I searched "easy french stories" and eventually found what I wanted.

You Tube helps listening skills. You can search for content with subtitles.

There are tons of other language apps, many for a price. Beelinguapp has short stories in many languages at three different levels of difficulty, a fair amount of free content before you have to pay.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K3rnelPan1c
K3rnelPan1c
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I bought a textbook and El Cronómetro and prepare to gain a B1 certification.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kshulters
kshulters
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Some people use more advanced websites.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matteo449299

Such as? I've heard of memrise but idk if it has more content than Duolingo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessikaMorgan

Memrise isn't necessarily more content than Duo, but it has different content. Duo is pretty good for picking up the broad basics of grammar. Using it let's you actually build sentences that make sense.

Memrise is more for vocabulary acquisition. There are tons of courses made by lots of people on different subjects (not just languages) and you could possibly learn one of those subject courses (math, history, art history) in your target language. Strictly looking at the language section, you can drill down into more specific vocabulary, like going through lists of different animals or foods, or how to say the name of different countries in your target language. Maybe even a course that is concentrated on learning the vocabulary of a favorite hobby or other interest.

So, honestly, I use Memrise and Duo side by side. No reason to wait to start picking up more words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pancake84

I've herd that people who complete there tree just continue learning it on duolingo to cram in all of that knowledge

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Midnightwards666

True, but no one can become fluent using only Duolingo forever. I think the OP meant after Duolingo.

1 year ago
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