"My name is Maria."

Translation:マリアといいます。

June 2, 2017

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lavitas
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Why can't I use "wa" as topic marker?

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Digicrests

は is pronounced as わ when used as a particle. Also in some words like こんにちは.

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
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Yes! This is a key thing.

Also, to explain why it's different in "こんにちは", this isn't exactly a word so much as an expression, and in this expression, は serves as the topic marker.

I've read that there is a historical reason for this, i.e. that originally people would start with "こんにちは" / "今日は" (writing it in Kanji because the meaning is more apparent, i.e. you're talking about "today" or "this day") and then maybe say something like "ご機嫌いかがですか"...a little bit like asking "How are you today?" But...this got shortened to just the first part...sort of like how in English people might greet each other just by saying "Morning."

When I read this explanation I was like whoa, this makes so much sense cause we do the exact same thing in English and then suddenly I understood why the particle is also pronounced that way in that expression...before it had just seemed like a weird exception to the rule that I needed to memorize.

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HarryD90

You havn't answered the person's question at all. None of you have, you've just gone off on tangents about your own lives. Again, WHY isn't wa used as a topic marker here?

December 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ayvah01
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Because this sentence has no subject, there is no subject marker. ("Watashi wa" is implied.)

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sakata_Kintoki

The sentence has a subject, and that subject is わたし. It could very well be 私はマリアといいます but in Japanese, you often drop the subject if it's apparent. Therefore, back to the original question, you definitely can use the topic marker here, if you don't drop the subject.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ayvah01
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Again, the subject in the Japanese sentence is not omitted and therefore the Japanese sentence has no explicit subject. It's reasonable to assume the subject is "I", but you shouldn't make a blanket assumption that the omitted subject is always "I". Context is important.

January 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonRig1250

thank you! It just clicked after i read this.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/akoakini
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マリアは言いますmaria wa iimasu would mean maria will speak of something while on the other hand,マリアと言います maria to iimasu is a common phrase to tell others how you are called, this is under the usage of the とto particle, well of course there are different ways to tell others your name, like 1.私の名前はマリアです。watashi no namae ha maria desu. 2.私はマリアです。watashi ha maria desu. 3.マリアです。maria desu. the given example above is very polite one, and there is also a very very polite one which would be マリアと申します。maria to moushimasu. i think you just need to remember these.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/_Avgust
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Thank you. Pity I can't bookmark your answer.

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RishabhShah911

Take a screenshot

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/UetzelBrue

I think it is obsolete since "wa" is used to determine the topic in the sentence which you don't need and use when there is just one option.

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Stembairu

Because you would use it like: Watashi は Maria といいます。but the watashi is omitted in most exercises.

November 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/crisFerrei262966

I dunno

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/L_7_
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What does と mean in this sentence?

June 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TyrantRC
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seems like "と" is used to list nouns that you already know, in this case you are listing your own name (without さん because it would sound as arrogant) and using an inflection of the verb 言う【いう】 to declare your list of names. That's what I'm getting from google. と is also used to quote people and infer taking action.

"Maria to iimasu", "iimasu" being the inflection of the verb and "to" the particle connecting the list (which contain one item) and the verb.

Also I don't know Japanese so take it with a grain of salt.

February 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jake3.14
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It's just part of the verb といいます to my understanding

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

と actually functions as a quoting particle. いいます can also be written as 言います, meaning "to say", so と indicates that the bit before it is what you are saying (when referring to yourself).

(私は)マリアといいます。 (As for me) Maria <-quote this say

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/thesharanaithal

と also means 'and' is it?

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Otto178048
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Yes, when between two things that e.g. are both the topic. Like Maria and John are American.

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/kittycat2223
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I said Maria-san. Why is that wrong?

June 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mizzcriss
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Because you don't say 'san' when referring to yourself, only others :)

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rollimmo

San implies respect on their name, akin to us referring to someone as Mr./Ms./Mrs.

So her name is just Maria, not Ms or Mrs Maria.

September 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pronte
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Why is "maria - wa (ha) - toiimas" wrong?

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

This is ungrammatical because は (pronounced wa) is a particle which indicates the topic of the sentence, kind of like starting with "as for Maria". と is also a particle, but it indicates that the bit before it can be considered as being put in quotation marks.

The way you have your sentence there, it translates to I say "Maria wa".

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PianistKevin
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私の名前はマリアです is the literal translation of "my name is maria"

November 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Giammod
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it said translate "My name is Maria," and because I've studied Japanese before, I thought I'd be obnoxious and entered, "私のなまえはマリアです" and it accepted it. but is there a colloquial usage difference between "のなまえは" and"といいです"?

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lingua-theresa

Yes, the first is used in a formal conversation while the latter is more informal kinda like "my name is maria" vs. "I'm maria/call me maria"

January 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Spidersparxx

If is is asking to say, "my name is Maria." why wouldn't it accept "わたしは マリアです"

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Tiger570122

i think that means "i am Maria" not exactly "my name is Maria" -- small difference in wording

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/hollt693

マリアといいます doesn't mean "my name is Maria" either. It's more like "I am called Maria".

February 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Xandaros
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This would be correct, but sounds a bit unnatural. If you leave off the "わたしは", it is accepted.

February 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Max49576

In a few of my texts books it states, saying ' watashi wa maria desu' or even maria desu would be fine too. (I don't have a Japanese keyboard.

February 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

It is completely fine, but Japanese is notorious for having multiple, strictly defined ways of saying the same thing with differently levels of formality and politeness. This exercise is basically giving you a sneak peek into that.

It does seem a bit strange to me that the developers chose to assign a specific translation to each, since English formality is distinctly less well-defined than Japanese, but I think a lot of people are missing the point that you can say essentially the same thing in different words, simply because they've learned one particular set of words before.

February 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LuckyLanding

I added けん after Maria and got everything else right and I got it wrong. Should one not address his/herself with respect?

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

In Japanese culture, yes, one should not address his/herself with respect. Polite, 丁寧語【ていねいご】 or humble, 謙譲語【けんじょうご】 language is expected when talking about yourself/your actions.

Also, I think you meant the suffix くん, not けん (which isn't a normal name suffix). くん is typically masculine, though that doesn't make it would be incorrect to use it for Maria, and diminutive/familiar, not respectful.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BroHacker

What is the difference between "ます" and "です"?

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasBruc18

I interpreted the sentence as "She calls herself Maria" and I therefore used the 'san'. Marked wrong. Couldn't this sentence work using my misinterpretation?

October 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen256544

Why is it iimasu and not desu?

February 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/T-Leaf

Because she is sayng MY name is maria rather than I AM maria. If that makes sense. because imasu used for describing a subject as a person. Desu can be used pretty flexibly. Used to describe subjects as anything (object, person, animal) although it would be incorrect to put desu and imasu next to eachother. You always put the noun or adjective before desu and imasu. Verbs can be used for imasu. For example I am eating looks like I eating am. Or I am running looks like I running am. (Thanks to help from my Japanese friend Kazumasa)

February 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sakata_Kintoki

Like T-Leaf said, the difference is how you say it.

マリアと言います。Literally: "I am called Maria."

マリアです。Literally: "I am Maria."

です is not a verb but rather copula (a special construction meaning existence). In some languages, like English, copula is just expressed by a verb ("to be"), but some languages, like Japanese, have both the copula (です) and "to be" verb (あります / います).

February 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Mele27131

The answer I had to put in was "マリアと言います。" I did not learn the kanji "言" It is not in the list of the kanji learned in this section because the ones learned in this section are: "人,中,国,日,本,田"

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/wairanmax
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Why do I have to say "マリアよ", but not "マリアですよ"?

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jungerstein
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マリアよ: A very bold but grammatically correct way to say 'I am Maria. ' It can also be understood as a call: 'Maria!'

マリアですよ: A statement to express 'It is just Maria. / I AM Maria. ' If the final よ (for a strong, affirmative tone) is dropped, it could be OK to say 'マリアです' (I am Maria. / It is Maria. )

マリアといいます: An acceptable polite way to tell one's own name: 'I am called Maria'.

マリアともうします: Analysed as マリアと + もうします. A decent, polite, humble way to introduce oneself: 'I am called Maria. '

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Small caveat to マリアよ: saying this is not only bold, it will also make you sound rather feminine

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/wairanmax
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Thank you

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkErdman
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I like the last option here - I think mousu is a better verb than iu or yuu here...

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Yuuzora

マリアと言います。The way I see this, it says more "call me Maria" than "I am Maria". I mean... it is possible to call someone something and that not be their whole name, or even their real name. It just seems like an odd way to want to translate that.

March 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/9HzZ4

To E Mas?

But I thought saying "I am" is Dess?

August 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GalCk
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When can I use は ?

August 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/dhirotsu

A more literal translation of "My name is Maria" would be:

私の名前はマリアです。

Or in hiragana:

わたしのなまえはマリアです。

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/han0han

アメリカしゅっしんです。/ あめりかじんです。 マリアといいます。/ 名前はマリアです/ まりあです what`s the difference? And what meas "いい" and "しゅっしん" ?

September 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Pikachu025
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The first sentence with America in katakana is correct. The second sentence is not fine because "America" is in Hiragana (which is very rare).

「いい」means "good". 「と」is used to quote or reference to a phrase.

「マリア と いい ます」 can be literally translated to "'Maria' would be fine." or "It's fine to address me as Maria.".

The fourth sentence is literally "Name is Maria.".

The final sentence is "I am Maria" or "It's Maria" when someone asks your name. :)

December 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/denise9744

Am confused on introductions with japanese form. When i look it saying one then then i follow it wrong. Wounder if there a better way to follow.

February 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/H.ello
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Why isn't it Maria-san toiimasu?

February 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrom.9
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In japanese you should not use the these honorific terms when talking about yourself.

March 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonRig1250

... lesson learned. I'll think a little different before i face roll the answer next time. Read Japanese in Japanese. Dont just translate into your native language, once you start getting comfortable that is. FEEL the way the word makes you feel, if you read "ear" feel your ear and repeat the Japanese word, translating is the worst way to learn a new language from my understanding.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DnelKHghtn

I got it right, wth? I checked, I looked for 10 mins, and the supposed to be correct answer was the exact same answer that I put.

March 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/wise368880

Doesnt the translation mea "I am Maria" not "My name is Maria"?

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Danny761737

To be honest you can translate it either way. From a perspective of translation it doesn't make much of a difference. Because in English saying "I am Maria" or "My name is Maria" isn't too different

December 10, 2017
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