https://www.duolingo.com/Greg985259

If I hypothetically learned every word that the duolingo Swedish course has, how fluent would I be?

It's really hard to find resources to learn a language online. In popular languages, people just assume you know it or they don't care if you're not born with that language. I bounced around between a few online courses on Swedish grammar, so I would say I have a pretty good grasp on it. Now I use duolingo because there's nothing else. To be honest, I think it's hurting my skills but I have no idea what else to do. Some of the stuff is too easy and I feel stuck for days at a time. When I learned Esperanto I easily memorized every word and quickly gained fluency without duolingo, but for some reason, I rarely pick up words quickly in Swedish. It feels like I'm on a beginner's plateau. Maybe I just learned the grammar too fast? I'm just overwhelmed by all the words and I feel like I'm stepping into a massive mansion of culture I have no right to be in. The language has not clicked for me at all, and it's been one or two weeks. (the goal is to read and write B1-B2 swedish, I don't care about speaking unless it's a specific sound not in english)

1 year ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CarolinaViking

Add the Memrise Swedish Courses to your daily practice. It will help a lot. You'll hear a native speaker and get phrases that Duo doesn't include. They work well in combo together.

Babbel is good as well but you'll have to pay for it. It's really good for people that have finished the DL and MR courses.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JensBu
JensBuPlus
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You can learn 10,000 words and not be fluent if you don't practice. You can be fluent with less than 50 words if you practice them. There is a difference between active and passive vocabulary.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Vocabulary-wise, you'd have everything needed for everyday conversation, and a great starting point for more advanced things such as prose and terminology.

Exercise-wise, you'd still be a fair bit off. It's one thing to construct short sentences, but it's another thing entirely to build longer ones in your head on-the-fly, with subclauses and conjunctions and lots of grammar.

Duolingo excels at teaching you the former, and it's quite good at giving you the tools to let you explore the latter. But it doesn't teach you the latter - that is a skill, and it takes constant practice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buzdawg
Buzdawg
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If you're expecting to get a grasp on a language within one or two weeks then it is no surprise you feel you are having issues with it. Esperanto was literally made to be easy to learn. Swedish can be quite a tricky language sometimes, and even after learning it for seven months, I'm still quite far off fluent (I use multiple resources).

"Fluent" is a pretty vague term. In my eyes, fluency means you have a working knowledge of the language's grammar and a wide range of vocabulary which can get you through most everyday situations. In order to have this kind of language manipulation ability, a LOT of time needs to be spent exposed to a language, and certainly far more than 2 weeks.

You are at level 7 in Swedish on Duolingo, and when I was at the same level I also found the vocab to be quite easy, but it quickly becomes more applicable to everyday situations as you go further through your tree.

What I'd suggest is to stick it out and do your best not to rush through the tree in the hope that you'll learn the vocab faster, because you'll just continue finding yourself overwhelmed by the sheer amount of stuff you'll have to revise. The best way I've found to solidify your knowledge of words and grammar is to hold off as long as possible from moving on to further exercises and make sure that you are confident in the words you've already learned. For example, at level 18 I still have not completed the tree and have absolutely no intention to until I am as confident as possible with the vocab I already know.

Hope this has cleared some stuff up mate, all the best with learning Swedish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolodavino
paolodavino
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Agreed with this. The guy above that says he learned Swedish in a month is lying--either to himself or to you. Don't be disheartened after just a couple of weeks. Swedish seems simple at first because it is so similar to English, but there are a lot of ins and outs. Stick with it, you'll get there.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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To be fair, though, that guy didn't claim to be fluent, and also said he learned Swedish in Sweden with a language teacher - that's quite a huge difference from learning on Duolingo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buzdawg
Buzdawg
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Not necessarily. Like devalanteriel said, being in a country with a teacher is vastly different from work on your own with an online program. While I wouldn't say that the person in question "learned" it in a month, I'd have no problem believing that they learned enough to sort them out comfortably with work. My dad moved to Australia 47 years ago in his early twenties, with absolutely no experience in a language similar to English (our family language is Albanian, which is very different to English). He still managed to learn English well enough, without a teacher, in a reasonable period of time such that he could work easily.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yourbuddy_
yourbuddy_
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If I remember correctly, Albanian has no relatives, right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buzdawg
Buzdawg
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None that are particularly close, no. It's most similar to some other Eastern European languages but it's still quite different from those too. There are also two different dialects (Gegënishtë and Toskërishtë) which differ much more than usual dialectal variations in other languages like Swedish, for example. While they are mostly mutually intelligible between native speakers, for those who have only been exposed to one or the other, understanding the other dialect can be quite tricky, even though they are within the same language.

1 year ago
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