https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl

A very peculiar question about dialects.

Mr_Eyl
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I've recently started watching Wallander, and I'm currently in the middle of the second episode. A secondary character has appeared and while I can understand his Swedish well enough, his accent and pronunciation seem very peculiar to me.

He seems to sound a little Danish in places, but I don't know why a Dane would bother with Swedish. After realising that he had a Swedish name I then started to think that it's a southern dialect I'm unfamiliar with, and it's really starting to bug me.

I realise this is a very odd request, but if any native Swedish speakers have episode 2 of season 1 to hand then I'd really appreciate it if they could skip to 49 minutes in and tell me where this mystery man som heter Ove and his annoying accent come from.

Thanks in advance to anyone who feels like indulging me. :)

1 year ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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Eva33964 is right.

I don't have that episode here, but I've watched most of the series over the years. It's a bit unrealistic, in the way TV series often are (also in the English speaking world), that the main characters speak a less strong version of the accent of the place where it's supposed to take place (to appeal to viewers).

So, in my native-speaker-but-no-linguist opinion, I find that the main characters in this series speak pretty bland, generic Swedish (from Sweden) whereas a lot of the minor ones (including regular ones) speak a more realistic Scanian (skånska). This dialect can be very hard for us non-Scanians to understand, and does seem almost Danish to us.

In some episodes, Wallander or his colleagues go to Copenhagen and simply speak Swedish there and understand the Danes who simply speak Danish back. I assume this would be both possible and realistic for Scanians going to Copenhagen, but I had to read the (Flemish) subtitles for those bits... :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva33964

This is true. I just checked by watching a part of a TV eposide (on dr.dk, Danish television) "Et glimt af Danmark II (8:8)" but one cannot lean back, it takes a bit of concentration. If you work in Sweden and get Danish guests visiting the office, it's presupposed you'd be able to follow their presentation in Danish, but they're usually prepared to give it in English if need be, and you're encouraged to ask if you don't understand this or that Danish word or expression.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva33964

Mr_Eyl wrote "I don't know why a Dane would bother with Swedish". I'm not a fan of Wallander (the book character) but aren't those stories set in the town Ystad on the southernmost tip of Sweden? If you go to Wikipedia and look up "Treaty of Roskilde" in 1658 there's a map on the right side, which might explain why you even now some hundreds of years after the fact still do pick up a Danish-sounding buzz in those parts. Ystad, together with all of Scania (the county), was transferred from Denmark to Sweden following the Treaty of Roskilde in 1658. Can't say if this has something to do with that second character appearing in your film, though, but chances are he's speaking in heavy "Scanian" (or whatever the dialect might be called in English). You might go out on the web and look for the film "Svenska Dialektmysterier avsnitt 3 - Skånska" by Fredrik Lindström to learn more about the mystery of the appearance of the Swedish dialect "Scanian".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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Well, I looked into it and it is indeed Skånska. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction!

When I said that about Danes I was simply under the impression that they'd speak Danish in Sweden, especially so far south.

1 year ago
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