"Jamás lo has permitido."

Translation:You have never allowed it.

5 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Is Jamás different from nunca at all or do they basically mean the same thing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bohoinparadise

Both mean "never" but jamás is more emphatic.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wwang.1

Thank you!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidmalt

Never have you allowed it is exactly the same statement so why is it wrong ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

Stick with the simplest correct translation and avoid the literary or poetic English versions. We are here to learn Spanish, not to show off our English skills.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithM445566
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Nobody would really say that in English - though it is not wrong, it would sound strange to say it. It is an example of sounding like Yoda.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

Have you never allowed it? Is a question.
You have never allowed it is a statement or declaration. There is a difference

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ken120

Why is " You never have allowed it " wrong ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob_Kruger

It's not wrong. The placement would slightly change the emphasis, but it should have counted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DXabier
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I am not a native English speaker but as far as I know "have" in this sentence is an auxiliary verb and the adverb must follow it

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cardano
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It is not absolutely necessary that the adverb must follow have; that is just the most common, most natural construction.

When you stray from that order the result can be awkward constructions, archaic/literary constructions, or constructions that create slight changes in emphasis.

These create sentences that people typically would not use in day-to-day speach; as, Never have you allowed it, you never have allowed it, etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardo320

I don't see why either

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BClaw5
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Why is "You have never allowed him" wrong. Lo can be it or him right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyFal1

Exactly. That was my interpretation: You have never allowed him; And it was marked wrong :.( DAFUQ. I'm going to report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oquirrh1079
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You never have allowed it is the same as You have never allowed it. Placement of the modifier does make a difference, only in style or in emphasis depending on what the writer wants to emphasize.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jadavid
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quite agree it is somtimes very aggravating!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

Stick with the most obvious translation and word order and avoid fiddling around with the endless variations of saying the same thing in English... and you will experience less aggravation ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tac730

"Never have you permitted it" is not acceptable. Is there a reason that my answer was incorrect ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

While that may be grammatically correct, it's very odd phrasing in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dm8233
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It is used commonly enough to say that it is not "very odd"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

Really? You prefer that to the obvious "you have never permitted it"? The point here is to learn Spanish, not to get duo to accept every poetic or literary variation of English translation you can think of. Learn the Spanish, translate to show you understand the Spanish, don't translate to show others you know how to juggle the word order and say the same thing slightly differently in English. People might think you're here to show off rather than to learn Spanish and help others. Not everybody here is a native English speaker and throwing up all these complaints about how some less likely English translation should be accepted just makes it harder for some people. Once you have the simplest and most common correct translation, stop. Just stop. This is not a competition to see who can complain the loudest about how their pet variation of English isn't accepted by Duo, or to clutter up the comment section with irrelevancies. If your comment is not geared towards helping someone understand Spanish better, then take the hint: don't comment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithProud

Never has one person said so much about so little.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarlaOlora

You have never given permission should be accepted

2 months ago
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