"I like you."

Translation:Ich mag dich.

March 4, 2013

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wjdyce
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Is there a difference between "dich" and "euch"?

September 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CandaceLei

"Dich" is singular you while "Euch" is plural

October 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Samoreno_

What is the difference of euch and ihr

December 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/faria27

I think it's the same difference between "du" and "dich"; one is the normal case and the other is the accusative? I am not a doctor...

January 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Nerkitt
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Exactly. "du" and "ihr" are nominative, "dich" and "euch" is accusative.

(Incidentally, "euch" is also the dative of "ihr", but that doesn't matter in this sentence.)

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jerkoid

Dich -> you, euch -> y'all.

Except in the nominative case, which I don't believe English has

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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English has a nominative case, or you could call it subjective case -- it's the case that "I" or "we" are in, as opposed to the objective case "me" and "us".

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/verbomph

The direct object, in this situation "you", of the verb "like" or "mögen" means it is represented in the accusative case: dich (you-informal), euch (you-plural), and Sie (you-formal).

I am so easily thrown off by this and had to look it up... repeatedly. I hope commenting on it here, burns it into my head!

June 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryKaelin

Why is it appropriate to use a plural "you" (euch) in this sentence? This is supposedly a flirting section, and it seems unlikely or extremely confident that the speaker would be trying to pick up more than one person at a time. ...?

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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I'll go for the "confident" -- why not imagine one person going up to a group of two or three people and trying to chat them all up at once?

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/missriley

'I mog di' ... This is Austrian slang for 'I like you.' Just a nice little fact :) Duolingo doesn't like it though, so don't use it as an answer!!!

January 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/vonbergenv

Why not Ich mag Ihnen?

April 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MartyCashew

Ihnen is for dativ, but this is akkusativ (vierte Fall)

July 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/gprobst

I'm wondering the same thing. Would "you" not be dativ case in this case, in which case we would use "Ihnen?"

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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It would not be dative case here, no.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NataliaTsami

when should we capitalize du,dich,dir ?

December 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
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They used to be capitalized in letters etc. to express politeness. Today (after the spelling reform), you can capitalize them, but you don't have to.

January 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RamiroF.

How is "Ich mag du" wrong!!!!!?????

April 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Endoyo
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Du is nominative, dich is accusative.

December 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/arangelovivan

can we do the same with the verb "lieben" Ich liebe dich;, Ich liebe euch;, Ich liebe Sie?????

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
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You can (however it would be weird to tell someone that you love them if you're not even close enough to use "du").

February 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Incrump7

Can someone explain the difference betwn dativ and akkustiv.

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PJMCD
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Dativ = Dative - to noun i.e. I give the bread to you
Akkusativ = accusative - i.e. I like you

July 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Istrael
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Why Sie instead of Dir like when we say "Ich danke dir"

April 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kirstinmjkeller

You say dir because 'danken' is one of the verbs that makes you take the dative case. In this case, mag does not. So it will be "Ich mag dich, ich mag euch, ich mag Sie" and so on. Just like "I love you" is "Ich liebe dich" (not dir). Hope this makes sense :)

May 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/joacochacoman

Ich magst du. Wouldn't that be OK for informal?

March 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/davye
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Verb conjugation:

I like = Ich mag

You like = Du magst

The other person in the sentence is in the accusative case:

Me = Mich

You = Dich (or euch)

So you could have:

I like you = Ich mag dich / euch

You like me = Du magst mich

I don't think 'ich magst du' makes sense?

March 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/joacochacoman

Yeah that is perfectly clear. thanks

March 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kirstinmjkeller

That would be saying "you love I" because you have "magst", making "du" the subject. "Ich mag du" would still be incorrect, because 'du' is accusative, so it would have to be 'dich.' My family is native German and have never used any informal sayings for these (because they are rather short anyway) except for dropping "ich" from time to time

May 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Kayden007

What does accusative mean?

November 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertLunkez
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what does mean "gefallen" ? is it a dative verb?

March 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
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It is. You can think of it as meaning "is pleasing" or "to please", because its grammar is different. E.g. Du gefällst mir = "I like you" (literally "You are pleasing to me").

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AundreaNew1

I've tried all the answers but it keeps calling me incorrect. Is there something I'm missing?

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Yes -- there should be a line above the exercise that says something like "choose ALL of the correct answers" which you probably missed, if you only picked one answer at a time.

Sometimes, two answers are correct and then you have to pick both of those in order to proceed. Very rarely, even all three are correct.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ZekeWalton

Whats the diff between mag and mögen

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Verb conjugation.

  • ich mag
  • du magst
  • er mag, sie mag, es mag
  • wir mögen
  • ihr mögt
  • sie mögen; Sie mögen

mögen is also the infinitive and thus also the dictionary form

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
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Mögen is the unconjugated form and cannot be used with ich, du, er etc. Just like you can't say "he like", but have to say "he likes" instead. You have to choose the corresponding verb form for each subject: ich mag, du magst, er mag...

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Mögen is the unconjugated form and cannot be used with ich, du, er etc.

That's misleading, because "etc." sounds as if you mean all personal pronouns.

But wir mögen and sie mögen are correct -- remember that the wir and sie forms always look like the unconjugated (infinitive) form with the exception of the verb "to be" (infinitive sein but wir sind, sie sind).

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexaLindb475

Why isn't ich liebe dich a possible answer?

February 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Because that means "I love you" and not "I like you".

March 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/srkhn
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Wrong translation. My selections are: 1) Ich mag Sie. 2) Ich mag Du. 3) Ich mag Dir.

Correct Solution is: Ich mag Sie.

Why???

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Because mögen is a regular transitive verb -- it takes a direct object in the accusative case.

du is in the nominative case, so ich mag du is not grammatical.

dir is in the dative case, so ich mag dir is not grammatical. (At least not in standard German. Berlin dialect is another kettle of fish.)

Sie is either nominative or accusative -- so ich mag Sie is grammatical.

If you wanted to use the informal singular pronoun, it would have to be ich mag dich.

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/srkhn
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Sir you are so quick. Sie is the plural one here isn't it?

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Sie can be singular or plural; it's the formal form.

The informal is du (singular) or ihr (plural); the formal only has one form Sie for singular or plural.

  • Hans, du bist ein Mann. Ich mag dich.
  • Hans und Peter, ihr seid Männer. Ich mag euch.
  • Herr Schmidt, Sie sind ein Mann. Ich mag Sie.
  • Herr Schmidt und Herr Müller, Sie sind Männer. Ich mag Sie.
June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/srkhn
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I see that you have knowledge of Turkish. So can we say it is similar as ''Siz'' in Turkish?

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Only partly.

siz can be informal plural, like German ihr, or it can be formal, like German Sie.

Yağmur ve Simge, siz arkadaşlarımsınız. (ihr)

Bay İpekçioğlu, siz arkadaşımsınız. (Sie)

Bay Demirtaş ve Bayan Öztürk, siz arkadaşlarımsınız. (Sie)

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jalnt
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Why is "Ich mag du" wrong?

April 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/razorstorm

Because the subject being liked should be in accusative case, and du is conjugated into dich in the accusative case.

Ich mag dich, or Ich mag euch (plural) would work.

April 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jalnt
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Thanks :)

April 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaJeanBean

I was always taught that you couldn't use mögen on a person, only on objects. Is this true?

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Bluthund
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No, that's not true. Mögen works for persons, pets/animals, objects, activities etc.

March 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/manisina

Are Sie and Ihnen bith plural? If so what are their singular forms?

March 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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The formal "you" in German -- like the English "you" -- does not distinguish singular from plural; it's the same whether you are speaking to one person or several.

So Ich sehe Sie could mean "I see you (one person)" or "I see you (several people)", for example.

August 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ConradBabel

Why is "Ich mag Sie" also a valid answer?

June 2, 2017

[deactivated user]

    Because Sie with a capital S is the formal you, both singular and plural. So if you say "Ich mag Sie", you're still telling a person (or possibly people) that you like them.

    June 2, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Thatguy94
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    Why is ich mag du not accepted?

    January 13, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    For the same reason that "I like he" or "I like she" or "she likes I" is wrong: you used the subject form du for the object of the verb mögen "to like".

    You have to use the direct object form dich in this sentence: ich mag dich.

    January 13, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderW24254

    Why am i using sie here?

    February 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    All of these translations are possible:

    • Ich mag dich. (spoken to one person whom you know well)
    • Ich mag euch. (spoken to many people whom you know well)
    • Ich mag Sie. (spoken to one or more people whom you do not know well, when you are being polite/formal)

    There are no correct translations using (lowercase) sie. (Ich mag sie. would be "I like her" or "I like them" but not "I like you".)

    This sentence belongs to the unit "formal you" which introduces the pronoun Sie for "you".

    You would use it when speaking to adult strangers or people you respect (e.g. your boss). Roughly, to people whom you would address by family name in English (e.g. "Mr Smith / Ms Jones") rather than by first name.

    February 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/The-German-Hit

    Why dich? It can't be accusative because it isn't being acted upon! It must be dative because it is recieving the 'like' here isn't it?

    August 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    Being the direct object of a verb does not necessary mean that the object feels some sort of action.

    For example, "see" or "love" mostly affects the subject, not the object, but the object is still grammatically the object of the verb. We say "I see him" and "I love him", for example, not "I see he" or "I love he".

    So dich is in the accusative case because it is the direct object of the verb mögen "to like".

    August 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyGMT
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    Odd this is in the "formal you" branch of the tree.

    January 24, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/DarfRU
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    Is it possible to say "ich liebe dich“?

    March 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    Is it possible to say "ich liebe dich“?

    That is a grammatically correct sentence, but it means "I love you" rather than "I like you".

    Thus, it's not an acceptable translation of Duo's sentence here.

    March 17, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickSte10583

    Duo only gave dir, du and sie as choices, I put Ich mag du and it was marked wrong, and said the correct answer is Ich mag sie.

    March 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    The other choice should have been Sie (capitalised = you), not sie (lowercase = her / them).

    ich mag du is as wrong as "I like he" -- the object of the verb has to be in the accusative case, not the nominative case.

    So the expected answer should have been Ich mag Sie (with capitalised Sie).

    March 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickSte10583

    I didn't read all the comments before I posted, got it now! Danke.

    March 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarinThacina

    Ich mag dir = i like you.. why isnt it correct?

    October 6, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    English has merged the Germanic dative and accusative cases into a single objective case, but German keeps them separate.

    You used the dative case, which is used e.g. for an indirect object -- but the verb mögen takes a direct object, so you should have used the accusative case: dich rather than dir.

    August 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/GreatScorpion

    None of the answers work

    December 17, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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    It says "pick ALL of the correct answers". The exercise will be marked wrong unless you do choose all of the correct answers you are shown -- more than one may be correct.

    August 27, 2017
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