https://www.duolingo.com/grey236

The word 'behoeven' and a bunch of other questions

grey236
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-I saw somewhere (in the course I think) that hebben behoefte aan means 'to need' and that behoeven means 'to need' as well. Is this correct?

-Can hebben te be a synonym of moeten/mean 'have to' in the context of: "He has to go there"

-I saw that the word rooien means 'to dig', but I also saw it means 'reds' as like a team (e.g. "Those reds are going to capture this point soon") along with blauwen. My question is, what would the difference between roden and rooien be?

-What's the difference between welkom in and welkom bij?

-What does een stouterd mean? I saw that stouterd means 'naughty' but that's it. I assume the meaning isn't great considering the rest of the message (in a chat) was something like Zij is een stouterd, but I might just have a dirty mind :P

-Does gaan take the preposition te when an infinitive follows? As in: "I'm going to eat"

-What does af mean by itself? I've always seen it as a separated verb preposition but never alone.

-I've seen two verbs for 'to join': zich aansluiten bij and joinen, what's the difference? (besides one being a lot simpler)

-When do you use naar with zoeken?

-Difference between gooien and werpen?

-Difference between raken and slaan?

-Difference between:

  • Achterlijk, Geflipt, Gek, Krankzinnig
  • Prikkelbaar, Geprikkeld
  • Gereed, Klaar

-What do these mean: (if something is a conjunction can you tell me if it's subordinate or coordinate as well please?)

  • of zo
  • geeneens
  • valt wel mee

-How do you say: "Glad to be here"? 'Blij hier te zijn'?

  • How do you say: "By the way..." I've seen tussen haakjes, trouwens and overigens but I'm not sure when to use them.
1 year ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Rooien means to dig up including the root, usually of root vegetables but also trees. You'll hear this word used in farming/agriculture. For example: De aardappels moeten gerooid worden = The potatoes have to be dug up. A person with red hair can also be called een rooie. In that case it's more or less slang. Rooien can also mean to make it, as in to survive. For example: Wij rooien het samen wel = We'll make it together.

As far as hebben te, this is not used in the same way as to have to, for which the Dutch equivalent is moeten. You might hear something like: Wij hebben een huis te huur = We have a house for rent.

Geeneens is regional Dutch.. Correct Dutch would be niet eens which means not even. For example, I might say: Je hebt geeneens geld! = You don't even have money!

Zoeken naar just means searching for or looking for. Mostly they are used together, but you can leave out naar. It's perfectly okay to say Ik zoek mijn kat but Ik zoek naar mijn kat is fine as well.

Af does have different meanings depending on the context and @leoniemesk gave some good examples. It can also mean off. For example: Kom eraf! = Get off (of it)! or someone might say Blijf eraf! = Stay off! (or keep your hands off of it).

Zich aansluiten bij would be the Dutch verb for to join (something), but joinen is obviously borrowed from English and is probably mostly used by today's Dutch-speaking youth.

Behoefte hebben aan means to need or to feel like having (something). You might hear for example: Ik heb behoefte aan een kopje koffie = I need a cup of a coffee. Behoeven by itself generally has the meaning of to be necessary. For example: Deze zin is duidelijk, het behoeft geen uitleg = This sentence is clear, it doesn't need an explanation.

By the way, I'm on Duolingo Tinycards as well, and I've made some flashcard decks in Dutch. They might be too easy for you, but check them out anyway: https://tinycards.duolingo.com/decks/4329a3d5-b80e-41ef-84de-bc42133a9630, and https://tinycards.duolingo.com/decks/e8b8490a-14d5-46b0-938b-0f6e6a0c668a. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Hartelijk bedankt!! Is it better to use hebben nodig or behoeven? Because I've always thought hebben nodig sounds kinda clunky. And finally what is nodig? (Like the grammatical term for it not the meaning)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Actually, it's nodig hebben (when you refer to it by itself) and yes, I'd recommend you use that instead of behoeven. Behoeven is not really used as an active verb, for use with people. It's really very easy to say something like: Ik heb mijn jas nodig (I need my coat) rather than Ik behoef mijn jas. If you said that, you'd be getting some very strange looks. Behoeven is also used more in written Dutch than spoken Dutch. Now, as for behoefte hebben aan, it means to need but it's not a concrete need, like one needs food or water to survive. For example: Alle kinderen hebben behoefte aan liefde = All children need (to feel) love(d). Nodig by itself, without using the verb hebben can mean necessary. For example: Het is nodig om naar school te gaan = It's necessary to go to school.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiritsuguZFC
KiritsuguZFC
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I would say "behoeven" sounds rather formal. I rarely hear someone use it. Hebben nodig is far more common. Also I do not really know what nodig is, I think I only use it in "nodig hebben" or "nodig zijn" (to be necessary). So I guess it means something like necessity but not sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leoniemesk

-the 1st question is correct

-for the 2nd question, i don't really see what you mean, as well for the 3rd question

-4th question: you say "welkom in" you use it with a building/place/land etc. "welkom bij" is used with people

-5th question een stouterd is practically a naughty person, but as a native speaker, i actually never use it, we all have different words for someone who is naughty , for example: 'stouterik' , 'kapoen' (mainly used by grandparents for little children) and 'deugniet' (it comes from the verb 'niet deugden' which means 'something isn't right') etc)

-6th question: 'gaan' doesn't take the preposition 'te', it's just followed by the infinitive.

-7th question: 'af' has many different translations, depending on which context it stands in, e.g.: 1) "Maak je huiswerk af" - "Finish you homework" (afmaken=to finish) 2) "Hij pakte mijn boek af" - "He took my book away"/"He stole my book" (afpakken=to steal)

-8th question: the first one is indeed 'zich aansluiten bij' but the second one is actually a new word, since we use a lot of english words in our language so it actually means the same but we just use the english word and we pronounce it a little bit different, e.g.: "Ik ga deze groep joinen"= "ik ga me aansluiten bij deze groep"

9th question: you use 'naar' ALWAYS with zoeken, because 'zoeken' on its own isn't correct, your sentence isn't finished then. There are a few occasions you can use 'zoeken' on its own, but that is very uncommon. For example: "Ik zoek naar mijn kat" - correct "Ik zoek" - incorrect ( people will ask you what you're looking for)

10th question: there is practically no difference between gooien and werpen, these are just synonyms. 'werpen' is only more formal then 'gooien' + when an animal gives birth, you also use 'werpen', because : "Een leeuwin werpt welpjes" (gives birth) "Een leeuwin gooit welpjes" (throws them)

11th question: 'raken' means to touch and 'slaan' means hitting smth/smn.

12th question: first four words: all synonyms, prikkelbaar means sensitive and geprikkeld means a lot of things (geïrriteerd, in a bad mood etc) + 'gereed' and 'klaar' are also synonyms.

13th question: 'of zo' = or something (like that) 'geeneens'= I never use it (lol) so I actually don't know what it means :/ (I feel ashamed lol, as a Belgian person I should know this haha) 'valt wel mee'= when someone is hurt and they ask them if it( the place where they're hurt) hurts, they usely respond with that if it doesn't hurt a lot. e.g.: "Heb je nog pijn aan je hoofd?" "Valt wel mee."

14th question: you surely can use "Blij hier te zijn!"

15th question: those three are correct, I personally use 'tussen haakjes' and 'trouwens', but when you use them, you always say them at the beginning of your sentence!!

Hope this helps you!! It's always nice to know that people learn Dutch, because when we meet someone who's not a native speaker, we usually speak English+ it's a really difficult language

greetings from Belgium :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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You don't only have to use trouwens or overigens at the beginning of a sentence. In the Netherlands, you can say something like: Ik heb trouwens geen geld = By the way, I don't have money. Or in the case of overigens: Zij hebben overigens altijd veel geld = By the way, they always have a lot of money.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leoniemesk

Da is juist :P, ik was da totaal vergeten.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Hartelijk bedankt!!! I'm just confused with three things though:

Doesn't aanraken mean 'to touch?

How would you use welkom bij in a sentence? Would it be like "Welkom bij ons huis" since it says "our"?

Finally, how would say "I'm looking" if you can't say "Ik zoek"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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"Doesn't aanraken mean 'to touch?" Yes, it does, definitely in the physical sense. For example: Don't touch me! = Raak me niet aan! Raken by itself can sometimes be used for touch, but more in a figurative sense. For example: Zijn opmerking raakte me erg = His comment touched me a lot.

"How would you use welkom bij in a sentence?" You can say: Welkom bij ons thuis= Welcome to our home, or Welkom bij mijn feest = Welcome to my party.

."how would say "I'm looking" if you can't say "Ik zoek"." By I'm looking do you mean looking at something? Or do you mean that you might tell someone I'm looking! when they told you to go find an object? In that case, you could say Ik zoek ernaar!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Oh I see with zoeken now! Bedankt voor alles!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RJ_G
RJ_G
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I'm going to take a stab at #3... but I may be completely wrong as I am learning Dutch as well. roden vs rooien, I'm going to guess is the difference between ABN (Standard Dutch) and Vlaams (Flemish Dutch). Compare: goedemorgen (ABN) and goeiemorgen (Vlaams).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Goeiemorgen is not just Vlaams. It's said in parts of the Netherlands as well, including Noord-Holland, the province I'm from.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RJ_G
RJ_G
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Thanks! I didn't know that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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No biggie! Standardized or ABN (Algemeen Beschaafd Nederlands) Dutch was developed out of all the regional Dutch languages, so people could understand each other better and to have a uniform written form of Dutch.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leoniemesk

that sounds about right

1 year ago
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