1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. What Should I Do After Duo-Li…

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stav575712

What Should I Do After Duo-Lingo To Keep My French Going And Attain Fluency?

June 6, 2017

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pentaan

You will learn much more French words and more difficult sentences by using the "Strengthen" features.
Here is the link to "Best Way to Make Your Tree Turn Gold and Stay Gold"
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6176795

Other ways you could improve your French:

Apart from that

  • read a newspaper article every day and try to learn its new words
  • listen to podcasts, watch movies with or without subtitles
  • converse with a native speaker as much as possible
  • write smaller texts, upload them on lang-8.com and let them be corrected by native speakers a.s.o.

There are numerous possibilities. Duolingo will only bring you to an A2/(B1) skill level in reading/writing and A1 (maybe A2) in listening/talking.

Info about language levels:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages
Read from "Common reference levels".

Good luck.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paralars1

I personally recommend watching movies, reading books, listening to music. Whatever you enjoy.

Finding a place to practice writing / speaking is good too, but can be difficult.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeNolan6

Study grammar in detail. For example, how many verbs can you take through all major tenses (a dozen or more)?

Here's a good site for practicing verbs: https://www.laits.utexas.edu/fi/vp/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceAly

I have to disagree with this. Learning verb tables and intensely studying grammar don't help you communicate. When we are listening and talking, we don't have time to think about the grammar rules. We have to have enough exposure to the language to understand it intuitively.

Use grammar as a reference when you don't understand something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeNolan6

That's right, you don't have time to THINK about using correct grammar in a real-time situation (like a conversation), it has to be so ingrained in you that you no longer have to think about it to use it.

We may disagree about how to get there, but perhaps we both can agree that Duolingo won't get you there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dalenkgu

I heard about this app called HiNative where you can talk with native speakers of France and ask questions and practice your pronunciation. Have you completed all your courses in Duolingo? Try to finish all the courses and strengthen them daily. This should make you pretty fluent.

Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.