1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "よろしく!"

"よろしく!"

Translation:Nice to meet you!

June 6, 2017

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

TLDR: よろしく is from よろしくお願いします or "I request (that our relationship/activity going forward) will be good/proper/suitable."

はじめまして is from はじめる or "(We're meeting) for the first time."

LONG VERSION:

This is one of my major gripes with how Japanese is typically taught -- in order to try and coddle the learner, they teach how words would be used in English given a similar situation, rather than the actual meaning of the words.

In most languages, there are pretty good 1-to-1 analogues with English -- but how the Japanese language works and thus how Japanese people construct their thoughts (syntactically) is very different from western languages.

For many words I would never use the 'literal' translation of a word's meaning if I were interpreting or translating Japanese for English consumption, but knowing the literal meaning really helps to grasp the language's construction, imo.

Rant over -- to your question.

よろしく is an adverb. Alone it means "well/suitably/properly". It's shortened here from the expression:

よろしくお願いします (よろしくおねがいします)

お in this case is just the honorific that got attached so often in this usage that it's now in practice part of the word.

願いする (願いします/ねがいします) is a noun/verb combo of 願い (wish/request) and する (to do / to make).

A super literal attempt to translate よろしくお願いします would be "I request well". Which is to say, I request that (our relationship/activity going forward will be) well/suitable. So よろしく here is modifying the unspoken part of the sentence there in parenthesis.

http://jisho.org/search/%E3%82%88%E3%82%8D%E3%81%97%E3%81%8F

始めまして(はじめまして) is a conjugation of 始める(はじめる), in this case the continuative (て) form, and specifically the polite (rather than simple) version of that form. The simple form here would be はじめて.

始める means "to start/to begin". て form has a whole slew of uses, but continuative generally means "something happened which has resulted in a change, and that result is still happening/existing"

Nice and confusing. which is probably why they just teach "Nice to meet you." Instead of "(We are) in the process of starting/beginning".

http://www.learn-japanese-adventure.com/japanese-verbs-state-continuation.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nihongo_papi

I hope you stay here for as long as possible - a great confusion will arise sooner or later. I'm glad someone else realizes how one-to-one doesn't work in 日本語.

Anyway, to my question: Is it possible, given what you said about 始める and て, to make a verb continuative without appending いる to it? Would 始めている and 始めて have the same meanings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

TLDR: はじめて/はじめまして is probably being used as よろしく was, that is to say only part of a full sentence, the rest of which is understood by the listener. Maybe it's "良うはじめましてください。" or some such.

はじめています is probably not a thing in this context.

NOVEL:

My Japanese isn't really good enough to answer that question, but I suspect you would not use -ている with the verb はじめる often, and even less likely when it refers to meeting someone. As I mentioned, て form has a slew of uses, most of which I still haven't learned myself. Let's take a crack at it anyway!

Genki I (2nd edit.) covers -ている extensively in Ch. 7. I'll quote some of it here:

A verbal 'te-form,' when followed by the helping verb いる, means either of the following:

(a) an action in progress, or (b) a past event that is connected with the present.

Which of these two senses a given verb is used in is to a large extent determined by the semantic characteristics of the verb.

Then it goes on to talk about verbs that describe (a) continuous states, (b) activities that last for some time, and (c) changes that are more or less instantaneous.

So (a) continuous states is out unless you're talking about the short period of time (5 minutes, max?) where you are in the process of meeting someone. In any case はじめる doesn't really mean "to meet" as we stated above... it means to begin or start. So we'd likely use another verb anyway.

(b) Activities that last for some time is also out, unless it takes you 30 minutes to meet someone.

(c) Changes that are more or less instantaneous is a more likely option here. Whether it refers to starting an acquaintenceship with someone or starting a project, the act of starting is fairly instantaneous. ("I am starting the project today." doesn't count, by the way. When we say that in English we are really substituting present tense for the future "I will start." If we start at 8:00am and someone asks us at noon, we'll say "We started this morning." rather than "I'm still starting today." In fact, a good rule of thumb for instantaneous... ness? is that if you can sensibly speak of 'still doing' a thing, then it's not so much instantaneous.)

The quintessential example for this (c) type of -ている usage is けっこんする (to get married). As Genki says, with these verbs, ている indicates a past occurrence of a change which has retained its significance until the present moment. In other words, ている describes the result of a change.

Another example it uses is すわる (to sit). I'll quote their example sentence here too (spaces added to make life easier).

みちこさん は まど の ちかく に すわっています。 (Michiko is seated near the window.) Note in English we call this the passive tense because "seated" is not used as a verb, but rather an adjective. But once again 日本語 ain't English or any other westernish language. Michiko sat down at one point, and she is still sitting in that same spot, so she gets the -ている treatment. If we were to try and use this logic with はじめる it might be better used with some lazy student (let's pick on Michiko again) who sat down to write a report 3 hours ago and still has yet to write more than a sentence. "Michiko, you started 3 hours ago, and dangit, you're still starting?!"

But for 'meeting', はじめる only makes sense in this present tense/one person to another/"Let's begin this thing" sense. Unless the people are in Star Trek and stuck in time loop, in which case they could potentially be stuck meeting each other for decades. But I will not use -ている to trap them in that limbo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skizzy

Hajimemashite is the request/command form for hajimemasu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMosuzu

Actually, Hajimemashite's hajime is 初め まして。Kanji 初め、is different from 始め、start/begin. 初めまして、means first time to see you. Therefore nice to see you (for the first time).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

see the thread below with KeithWong9 for more on this. Both kanji can be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SavinThePaladin

I think what you're looking for is colloquial speech. You can drop い in いる For example 食べている -> 食べてる. But of course thats colloquial speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan3s2020

Do you know an app that teaches you the exact meaning of words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ric.Jsho

I'm only being a bit facetious. Really, there's no "exact" meaning of many words, in any language; if there was, machine translation would be a lot easier. But seriously, a dictionary app is how I "learned" a lot of vocabulary, after being exposed to the words in context, of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Just wanted to correct:

The correct kanji for はじめまして is 初めまして, which means the first time. 始めまして means to start which is not correct in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

Apparently, the older generation tends to go with 始めまして whereas the younger tends to prefer 初めまして. There's a (granted, unscientific) survey referenced at the following link that discusses the usage change over time. It's all in Japanese but google translate is more than sufficient to get the point.

http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/%7EQM4H-IIM/k031002.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Didn't know there was a survey even on that. Thank and please accept a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

ha, thanks! neither did I, btw. I'd remembered reading something about it on a forum when I was doing my homework for another post. Couldn't find whatever I read before, but came across this link in a reddit thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

I just wanted to add as well, that お+verb ます-stem+します is grammatical construction of keigo which humbles the speaker, and not simply an お honorific for honorifics' sake.

For our case, お + 願い + します takes 願う meaning "I wish/request" and changes it to meaning "I humbly wish/request".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/9HzZ4

This hasnt helped me.

If not confused me more.

Which one means "Its nice to meet you for the first time!"?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

はじめまして is nice to meet you. Long form is はじめまして、お目(め)にかかります "It's the first time I see your face."

よろしく is let's get along well. Long form is わたしのことをよろしく接(せっ)してくださいますよう、おねがいします。 "I kindly request you to treat me well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurisurin.

Does this mean you can say 「はじめまして、よろしこ」 “Nice to meet you, let’s get along well”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

Yes, although it's usually どうぞ よろしく.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisGardi7

I've read all the comments but I am still confused by this. Would it be fair to say one is similar to saying "nice to meet you" as in meeting someone for the first time while the other would be more like "nice to meet with you" as in meeting with someone you already know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

No -- both of these would only be used for meeting someone the first time.

はじめまして only implies that you are meeting for the first time -- that's it. Technically it doesn't even imply that the meeting is pleasant, though unless you are avenging a loved one's murder and have only just now caught up with the culprit, it seems likely to have a pleasant connotation.

よろしくおねがいします implies the expectation of some further relationship, because it's requesting good treatment. It doesn't imply whether that further relationship will be short term or long term. So I could be meeting a car salesman and use よろしく because we will have a working relationship during this business transaction.

They can both be used together without any contradiction in meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessaTesla

To add what others have already posted about a direct translation, my Japanese teacher translated this phrase as "Please be kind to me. " she said it was a polite thing to say web meeting someone for the first time, to start your relationship off with positively. I know that sounds weird but that's what made sense to me, so maybe it'll help you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aideng584980

i agree. 'Yoroshiku onegaishimasu' doesn't Really translate, but the closest ewuivelant is 'please treat me well'.

Otherwise you have the nonsense, 'Nice to meet you, I'm X. Nice to meet you.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian525841

Why does the "i" from し becomes silent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

in short, the way the mouth forms air after the "sh" sound makes it easy to move to certain consonants in such a way that the vowel breath is muted/doesn't cause vibration across the lips. learning words with audio from the start will help you get an intuition for how it should feel/sound.

longer discussions here:

https://japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/1095/what-are-the-rules-regarding-mute-vowels-u-after-s-and-i-after-sh

http://thejapanesepage.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=7


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

In actual short: To make it easier to pronounce. Japanese does this a tad more often, especially with Shi becoming a Sh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

"i" and "u" de-voice/drop when they're among voiceless consonants. And the "i" is right between "sh" and "k".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beste_Schurk

What's the difference between よろしくand どうぞよろしく? (The latter being what Human Japanese taught me)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesley1996

The latter is just more polite, use a dictionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beste_Schurk

Where do I get one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesley1996

For PC use Jisho, on android you can use Jsho or takoboto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abhyudit

Is よろしく same as はじめまして


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

よろしく literally means "please accept" and is considered a very informal greeting. It is also used in contexts that have nothing to to with greetings.

はじめまして literally means "it is the first time" and is a little more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Actually, よろしく is simply an adverb that literally means "well" or "suitably". In most situations, the implication of using this phrase is something like "please treat me well/suitably" or "I hope you can do something well for me", but I don't know where people keep getting this idea that it is "literally" "please accept".

Secondly, describing はじめまして as "a little more polite" is, while technically correct, misleading because it implies that よろしく and はじめまして can be used interchangeably, which they cannot (even within "greeting" contexts).

  • はじめまして is used as an opening greeting when meeting someone for the first time, akin to "hello" in English.
  • よろしく(おねがいします) is more of a closing greeting after you've introduced yourself to someone new. There isn't really anything similar that's commonly used in English, but it carries kind of the same sentiment as "It was nice meeting you" or "I look forward to getting know you".

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

I don't know where people keep getting this idea that it is "literally" "please accept".

Some resources online say this. And learners, not knowing any better, assume this is correct and go with it. Where the resources get it from, don't ask me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

宜(よろ)しい is the polite form of いい means "good" or "suitable." よろしく is just the adverb form of よろしい so it is "well" or "suitably," and therefore "please accept" cannot be an original meaning. It is a valid derived meaning in some circumstances. For example, これを 職員室(しょくいんしつ)まで 届(とど)けて! よろしく! Please take this to the staff room. Thanks (or please accept as a more "literal" translation :p )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boomerlady

Could this technically be translated as "nice working with you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

I don't think so. This is literally a request of goodwill, so a better one will be "looking forward to working with you" instead of a somewhat retrospective "nice working with you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcos-Senpai

Guys, i'm sorry but i didn't understand if i should use よろしく when it's the first time that i'm meeting a person or when i already know someone and i meet him/her in a place, like "Nice to meet you man!". If you can help me, thanks a lot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Falkner

I have seen this also translated as "Welcome" is this correct? If not how would you translate this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiaros_Mokushi

No. Welcoming someone would usually be "Yokoso". Yoroshiku is more of saying you want things to go well between you two. A good translation would be something like "I look forward to [working] with you." English doesn't really have a good equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

*ようこそ (youkoso, or yōkoso)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

No.

A closer translation that I've been taught is "Please be nice to me." Usage-wise, the closest equivalent is "Nice to meet you."

"Welcome" does not really fit here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mithlas1

In practical use, wouldn't it be appropriate to translate this to "Well met!" (end of greeting expression) in English? That term isn't as often used anymore, perhaps it sounds too formal or archaic, but it's still part of current English and is closer than "Nice to meet you."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

No. The best translation is what's actually used, not what's literally more similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Floydius

depends on how you prefer to learn. I actually agree with you @Mithlas1, a more literal 'translation' is more helpful for learning the language. as mentioned above, natural-sounding translations are appropriate when someone else is consuming it. books, manga, movies -- all good candidates for the most natural-sounding translation you can make in the target language.

but for learning, and especially for learning Japanese, I think more literal is better for understanding how Japanese works. Tae Kim's guide subscribes to this philosophy as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenBrow471344

i am so confused so よろしくis the same as よろしくねがいします because that is what its teaching. but what is the difference between the two ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

In a nutshell, よろしくねがいします is the more polite/formal form of よろしく.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ix.pop

I thought it was "Hajimemashte" (Sorry if I spelled the romaji wrong)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

はじめまして (hajimemashite) and よろしく (yoroshiku) both roughly translate to "Nice to meet you" in English, but remember that translation is only partly what the words actually mean, and a great deal of what the equivalent usage is in the other language.

"hajimemashite" is closer literally to "it is the first time" and "yoroshiku" is closer literally to "please be nice to me". But we don't really say that in English, we say things like "Pleased to meet you". So that's how we translate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kawaiineko177

This actually makes sense thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bakka10

Wait, so between hajimemashite(i think) and this, which would be better to use in a casual convo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Usually use both of them. "Hajimemashite (nice to meet you), xxx to iimasu(My name is xxx), douzo yoroshiku (Let's get along well)." They mean differently and the difference is already explained thoroughly in this thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theothefrog

How come there was a different "Nice To Meet You" in the other skills?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frigorifico9

because they are not giving us the literal translations, but rather, how they are used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Because there are many ways to skin a cat, or say the same thing, or convey equivalent sentiments, or greet someone, or...

Japanese has as wide a range of expressions as English does (not whether more or less or by exactly how much, but it's close enough), and Duo is just introducing you to a few of them, so you can choose how to express yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zach_Factor

So "hajimemashite" is used for introducing yourself while "yoroshiku" is something along the lines of "nice to see you here, let's be kind toward each other"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2573

To quote a conversation from higher up on this page:

ChrisGardi7
I've read all the comments but I am still confused by this. Would it be fair to say one is similar to saying "nice to meet you" as in meeting someone for the first time while the other would be more like "nice to meet with you" as in meeting with someone you already know

Floydius
No -- both of these would only be used for meeting someone the first time.

はじめまして only implies that you are meeting for the first time -- that's it. Technically it doesn't even imply that the meeting is pleasant, though unless you are avenging a loved one's murder and have only just now caught up with the culprit, it seems likely to have a pleasant connotation.

よろしくおねがいします implies the expectation of some further relationship, because it's requesting good treatment. It doesn't imply whether that further relationship will be short term or long term. So I could be meeting a car salesman and use よろしく because we will have a working relationship during this business transaction.

They can both be used together without any contradiction in meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

Is this word in any way related to ようこそ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Actually, よろしい is a polite variant of よい so these two words actually have similar meaning literally.

よろしく = よろしく接してください (Please treat me well)

ようこそ = よくぞ来てくださいました (Well come) (よく=よう, こそ=ぞ)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmiliaBree

Ive read the comments but still just wanted to comfirm this in a real life context. For example, I would use hajimemashite (sorry, I don't have hiragana alphabet on my keyboard) if I was to meet someone at a store, passing through not expecting to ever see them again. Whereas, I would say Yoroshiku if i were to meet a classmate, as i would have an expectation of some form of a relationship moving forward... Am i even close to being right here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

No (you don't say this to strangers at a store). 初めまして and よろしく are often used together to form a "nice to meet you" context. よろしく itself is not "nice to meet you" at all. Most likely in real life when people use よろしく(お願いします) it does not mean "nice to meet you," as we use it with someone that we know more frequently than a stranger. It translates to various better alternatives, e.g. "I am counting on you," "Let's get along well," "I am looking forward to it."

Check these comments as well, I have a lot of explanations.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/23014203

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/22984927


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheney585361

「よろしく」の日本語から"Nice to meet you"と訳したものだけを正解にするのは無理があると思います。 例えば何かを頼んだ後の文に「よろしく」というのも日本語は同じ「よろしく」ですが、英語はNice to meet you なんて言わないと思います。 この正解を言わせたいならせめて(※初対面の挨拶)のような注釈をつけてほしい。そうでなければ状況によって正解になるもの全て正解とみなさなければ「よろしく」という言葉の訳として成り立たなくなると思う。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

もともと正解はPlease treat me wellでしたが、その英語の翻訳はあまりにも不自然だったからNice to meet youに変更したらしいです。私はPlease treat me wellのほうが初心者のためにはよっぽどマシだと思います。自然に訳すのならI am counting on youあるいはI am looking forward to itがいいでしょう。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimiisa

Would it be correct to say はじめまして。よろしくお願いします when meeting someone for the first time? Also, I'm using a textbook named Genki and it says that はじめまして "means how do you do?" is that correct? I'm a bit confused now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimiisa

Thank you so much! This really helped :)

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.