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  5. "I am hungry."

"I am hungry."

Translation:お腹がすきました。

June 6, 2017

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zazakoolaid

This exercise should also accept おなかすきました since people usually drop the が when speaking


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unematti

it's better to learn properly first then when you use it you can pick up on those nuances


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsudoNano

Wouldn't this translate to おなかがすいた?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiritsuguZFC

すいた is the informal/plain form, whereas すきました is the formal/long form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeldryn

In other words stick to 好きました when you are with coworkers or strangers since it's more polite. Use すいた with close friends.

(edit - oops wasn't being carful when I type. Be wary of auto correct folks. Ment to type 空き and got 好き instead (both spelled すき).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arsuru
  • 1562

That's the wrong kanji. 好き= like while 空く= become empty. They are both pronounced すき here, but only because of how 空く is conjugated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xmilkfedx

thank you! i've been using the wrong kanji for this and this def cleared it up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroBlaze

Well it made sense too "I LIKE STOMACH, THEREFORE I MUST FEED IT"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaHowell8

I had no clue! It makes sense they would teach us the keigo... that just means it was another point against my study abroad language usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeretBoy

What about おなかがすいています


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannaha70093

That is another way to say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazuto.kiri

That's luffy's influence i guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaclavH

Why past tense ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telemetry

Hungry and thirsty are literally 'stomach became empty' and 'throat became dry'. Don't worry about how they sound in English, they're just the phrases you use to express those ideas in Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arsuru
  • 1562

To fully explain we need to break down the sentence to see what is literally being said:

[My, implied] おなか [belly, stomach] が すきました [became empty]。 すく means "to become empty".

Kanji: お腹が空きました。

In order to be hungry now, one's stomach must have already become empty. This is just how it is expressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/achipa19

My stomach will surely get empty till I manage to learn this kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeldryn

Your link just gets redirected to a page that tells me Japanese isn't available onsite yet and to pick another language course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arsuru
  • 1562

I'm sorry, that totally slipped my mind; you'll have to be set to a different language on web to get there for now. I usually come to the website to comment and search for the question. I had wanted to avoid copying and pasting the same info, but I guess I'll edit my comment; though a user above has now answered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxi361984

I also want to know this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/medeaggd

Thanks for those people above taking the time to explain WHY, cultural implications, and the differences. I find this sort of thing absolutely fascinating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

お腹が空きました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kenn339668

That's exactly what I entered, and Duo marked it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LM0Uxa

What about はらへた?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeldryn

Funny trivia: "The very hungry caterpillar" translates to "Hara peko aomushi" はらぺこあおむし


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DemiMurgos

My sensei told me that it is a really rude form to say that you are hungry (and man-speech, so women aren't even allowed to say such thing). Don't know if it is part of a certain dialect, but she asked us not to use it in the classroom, however much we hear it in anime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeldryn

(EDIT-just realized I didn't read @DemiMurgos comment properly, and that he basically said everything I said in less words...)

That's not the reason why it's rude. It's ok to say your hungry as long as you say it politely. はらへた is very casual and impolite. The classroom uses polite speech. Use お なか が すきました。

The polite parts here are the use of お- (o) as a prefix for politeness, and also the use of the past tense polite form sufix -ました (mashita). When you omit them and use a slang, of course it's going to come out impolite. Casual speech is extremely common in anime, which is why anime isn't recommended for learning japanese (until you want to speak casually with your close friends).

As far as the male speech part goes, that's only true in casual language. It's not that women "can't" say it. It just sounds really awkward. It's the language equivalent of cross dressing. And guys aren't immune. Male tourists and immigrants that learn female casual speech from thier female teachers get fun poked at them for speaking like a girl until they learn. But all of this doesn't matter until after you learn polite form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

That's a different dialect. Kansai, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

I wonder how no-one corrected the phrase: はらへた(腹減った)

And as far as Kansai dialect goes, I've heard women there say おなか へった and はらへった is just common male/macho kind of language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KurenaiRozu

Why is suki here? Im lost


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kokawa1

Not the same word : 好き means "appealing" and use です, while this one, 空く, means "to become empty" and in this expression "to be hungry". This litteraly means "My stomach became empty". That's why kanji are important.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

"suki" (好き)= like, and "suki" (空き) = become empty. (suku conjugated) very confusing and hard to know which is which without the kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaranthZi

おなかすいた


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

お腹が空きました。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c.al.oh

In spanish a common expression is: "mi estómago está vacío"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albur_Godwin

I have an incidental question: since the Japanese version already uses a grammatical past tense, how would you express “I was hungry.”? This sounds tricky to me; maybe adding a “layer of past”, by using some kind of Japanese equivalent of the English pluperfect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

I was hungry (when I was walking home, for example) = お腹が空いていました. That's because being hungry is a state, right?

When you realize you're hungry, it happens in an instant, so お腹がすきました has it like "(I just realized) my stomach has become empty." When it doesn't surprise you or your companion anymore, you might say お腹がすいています - "My stomach is empty (and has been for some time now)." I don't think there's a big difference here between すきました and すいています though. Except if you want to say "I'm still hungry" when you've already eaten something - that would be お腹がまだ空(す)いています。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitmichels

Why the heck does 「空」 mean "sky" but 「空く」 means "become empty"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/masterphobophile

When you think about it, the sky is a pool of emptiness


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlphaMikki

Because "empty" is another of the kanji's meanings. Like "空手", karate, meaning "empty hand". Even karaoke is derived from it, meaning empty orchestra (the "oke" being short for orchestra).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaya_Tsuya

So does this have 2 meanings 'I am hungry' and 'Are you hungry'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

No, it doesn't have these two meanings. One is a question and if this sentence was a question then we would know it was a question because か would be at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

To make it a question, it would have to be: お腹がすきましたか。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owl30417

How about 飢えました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadhuShres1

is this English sentence past tense please check Japanese answer is in past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Literally it means - My stomach is emptied (technically this is passive but it sounds marginally better than my stomach emptied) - therefore if your stomach has already been emptied you are currently hungry. So.... おなか が すきました is translated as "I am hungry". Please take the time to read other comments on this thread before asking questions - this question has been asked and explained multiple times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avivaaa

Why do you use the past form but it translates to the present form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

This has been asked and explained multiple times in this thread. Please read through all the comments thoroughly before posing questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CobieFisher

お腹は空きました not accepted for some reason


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magda456699

I never heard anyone saying it, only ”おなかがすいた”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BD00000000001

I was surprised that it marked me wrong for missing the お at the start. I thought that was usually left out when talking about yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

Some words just sound weird without the prefix. Examples of this are ご飯、お茶、お腹。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosMend200

How do you say I was hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miguelojos

はらへった should be considered correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KurenaiRozu

Is it literally "my stomach would like to have something to eat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maeldryn

No, telemetry answered this already. The すきました isn't 'like' (好き) it's 'became empty' (空き).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

A Duolingo student's name who commented previously - see above.


[deactivated user]

    お腹空いちゃ…


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Standbymode

    WHY IS IT CORRECT FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE OF "I'm hungry" IN THE PAST TENSE, BUT THE (SUPERLATIVE) NEGATIVE "I'm not at all hungry." IN THE PRESENT TENSE?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

    I'm not really good at grammar so maybe you can write the example and I can help you out.

    Anyways, the reason why they use past tense in the sentence「お腹が空いた」it's because is an expression you use in a way that you just realized that "ohh... my stomach got empty", that's how they use it. The translation into "I am hungry" is just a way to make the sentence in english have meaning.

    Also why caps? frick you man, it hurts my eyes.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

    He's asking why you say お腹がすきました in past tense even though it tells about the present situation, but the negative version お腹が空いていません is in present (progressive) tense. Like, how about お腹がすいています?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zexion18

    It is supposed to be お腹がすきます


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

    That can be used for repetitive or future action, such as おいしい ものを 見ると お腹が すきますね。= You get hungry when you see delicious stuff, don't you?

    "I'm hungry" in polite Japanese is certainly お腹がすきました or お腹がすいています. And there are other ways to express it too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllenCrabt

    Please clarify between "I was hungry" vs "I am hungry."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bobby322520

    Why is it using past tense?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJrEdL

    I think it should be おなかが すいた


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsMadea1

    Why isn't this I was hungry? ました being past tense. I would expect おなかがすきます to be the correct answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    Please read the comments above. This has been asked and answered multiple times.

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