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  5. "いえからえきまで歩きます。"

"いえからえきまで歩きます。"

Translation:I walk from my house to the train station.

June 8, 2017

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkeays

家から駅まで歩きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessDan

Freaking haaaaard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bobby322520

I felt the same. I just don't know the vocabulary. That's what makes it so hard for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessDan

Hopefully we both get there, for me it's the unfamiliarity with "kara" and "made" so if I can get how those work in a sentence I'm hoping that'd help out :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandon.ha20

まで is like "as far as," so for example 電車に東京までのりました would be something like "I rode the train as far as Tokyo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Im guessing eki means station. Implying trains mostly. Although i have seen it in relation to airlines as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes, 駅(えき) means "(train) station": https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E9%A7%85#Japanese

I haven't seen it used regarding airports.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASleepingRock

Maybe not airlines, but airports often have train stations inside. Keisei is the best train line to get to Tokyo area from Narita Airport, fun fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jannah-Sophea

Kara means because or from. Made means to/until. Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zombies_of_dawn

家から駅まで歩きます If you read this backwards it turns into English. "I go to train station from home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claudiofuzita

Kara= from; made= to (the), at (the) these particles are also used to indicate directions (when in movement)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skunkbutt

Question, would it mean roughly the same (from A to B) if you said A から B まで or (to B from A) B までA から in a sentence? Or does the order matter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salatoma

Both are the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertKols

Why is it here 歩き instead of 行き?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DustinSchl

First one is kanji for walk and the second is kanji for go. 2 different verbs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will-J-Crawford

Funny considering the 行 represents footprints :o)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimmoKeski

Without furigana and unable use sound, I roughly remember their meaning with kanjis, but I no longer know how to pronounce or romanize them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

歩く = あるく (aruku). 行く = いく (iku).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

I am really surprised that you are learning a language without a dictionary. I would suggest you to source a good online dictionary when going on a language course (wiktionary is great for this purpose as it's multi-language to one). Copy and paste the verb (with the kanji) in the search box and voila... readings.. meanings...all there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Why is it my house? What in the sentence says 'my'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schizo_Rhino

I think いえ has that connotation. So, いえ means "home, my house" whereas うち is "house"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim613889

It's the other way round: いえ means "house", うち means "home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandyAlexa

I'm not sure that's a good way of thinking of it, given that うちの can be used to mean "our".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheena771936

Nice thanks I thought both are same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

いえrefers to home and implicitly, your own home. So 'my house' would be a great translation here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim613889

It's "my" house by context only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taihw

is train implied with "えき"? what if it's like a metro or bus station?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roxiired

ちかてつのえき (subway station) and バスターミナル (bus terminal), but I think バスてい (bus stop) is used as well even though they don't mean the same thing in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

駅 (えき) just means station. 鉄道駅 (てつどうえき) means rail station or train station. (鉄道 means railway)

the "train" is contextual in this particular sentence, and in a different context 駅 could refer to a different type of station.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes, 駅 is generally used to refer to train/subway stations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCixq8

Train is 電車(でんしゃ)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blusocket

This kind of sentence with a dropped subject makes it hard to infer the verb...my first guess was 'can walk' but Duo shows 'will walk' as the correct answer. Are there any strong clues in the sentence itself I can look out for next time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

The base form of the verb never means "can [do something]". There's another verb form for that. The base/ます form of the verb is simply a non-past verb form, so it can be present or future tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Duo hid the red herring word form in the word soup. I chose it instead of from, falling into the trap. Gah!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorneliaXaos

To the person who thougt it would be a good idea to include voth "from" and "form" in the word bank for mobile users... I hate you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

I said 'railway station' and it was marked as wrong. Go figure!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Could you also say "えきまでいえから歩きます"? I know the to/from order doesn't matter in English, so I'm wondering whether it matters in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Hmm... I'm not sure whether it'd be grammatically correct to switch the order of those two parts, but I think it'd probably sound weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WesleyEnri4

In some sentences, えき is just station, and this one needs train station... please keep it consistant!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica674881

Why 歩きinstead of さんぽ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trishka9

歩き = walking as a means of getting somewhere さんぽ = going for a walk, strolling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TDBR05

Why is "I walk from our house to the train station" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RinAsami

The kara messed me up on this one. I type it out as "I walk from the station to my house." and got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Torqada

Thought the insertion of 'train' was not implied. After all, the same statement could be used for a 'bus' station.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia543869

What is the difference between 散歩 and 歩く?

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