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  5. "かさをさします。"

"かさをさします。"

Translation:I put up the umbrella.

June 8, 2017

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillEtkin

Is it just me or is this way too literal? I would have used "open" rather than "put up" if I translated it myself...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

'I open my umbrella'
Natural English?
Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

I "put up" my umbrella. I'm from england.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

ありがとう!  koumori72さん。 :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

We'd put up a picture, or put up a tent, but it's always something we're no longer holding. Even for a guest, by "put up" we mean we give them a place to stay and then let them be. More formally we "hold erect". I think the Japanese doesn't meant that so much as to raise from the lowered position though. It could be out to the side or up. It's even said Americans always waving their hands about even in confined places like on trains makes them visibly nervous . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

'open' accepted 8/5/18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steel_String

I would interpret "I put up the umbrella" to mean that I put it away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B_2_H

Yeah. Opens is much bettet here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamR4

I would put up an umbrella if it was a big beach one. Putting up a regular umbrella to me might mean just raising it. Opening would be the act of unfurling it, regardless of whether I was holding it up in the air or not. I guess the question is whether Japanese has all those meanings or if there are specific words with those meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

傘を差します


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clrtnb

"I put up the umbrella" is just fine to me (baby boomer raised in Vancouver Canada); if I'm standing at a bus stop when it starts to rain, and I have an umbrella, I'll put it up. Could someone please confirm whether "kasa o sashimasu" also includes the sense of putting up a patio umbrella?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YannickDeG1

Also "an umbrella" not "a umbrella"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

To me, this sounds like I'm providing the umbrella with temporary lodging.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

To me, "opening the umbrella" is literally pushing the slide up and unfolding it, whereas "putting up the umbrella" is the whole set of actions: unlocking it, pushing the slide up to unfold it, and raising it over my head to the traditional position. One might open an umbrella (to dry it, to show off the pattern) without putting it up (to carry as a rain defense).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

Also, in Ireland, it's bad luck to open an umbrella indoors. Does anywhere else have that superstition?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

I think I've heard of that here in the US. But here it's even worse luck to open an umbrella in a lightning storm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I didn't know. interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeeovane

Yes, we have that in Brazil too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marziotta

Also Italy. Germany doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmyONeil

Yeah, I definitely heard that growing up (US)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajpache2000

Same in Argentina


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radatouy

Does "put up" in this sentence mean to put away or to open?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

Open. I've never heard "put up" to mean put away. Is that an American thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanDigital

I'm agreeing with everybody here... this is not natural American English. We OPEN an umbrella.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobbPorter

It is natural English English though, as someone from England. I've literally never heard anyone use the phrase "put up..." to mean put away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnotherChibi

I feel "I open an umbrella" is more natural. Duolingo also has a sentence like かさをさしていいですか? which they translate to "May I open my umbrella?" So keeping it to "open" would be more consistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edward937274

This is an odd translation. It should really be either "I will open (or put up) my umbrella" as masu form is usually used to indicate intent, or simply "to open (or put up) an umbrella" which is a sentence that would generally only be used in a textbook definition, or something of the sort. The sentence "I put up the umbrella" seems to be past tense to me which should translate to "傘をさしました", and even if there is some technicality I am unaware of, it still sounds very unnatural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisterM2402

Should this also accept the infinitive "To put up an umbrella"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

...No. This is a complete sentence in Japanese. The subject is implied (it could be "I", "you", "he"/"she", "we", or "they").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tinyheartbreak

To put something up means the same thing as to put away where I'm from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hukairui89

I hold up an umbrella. Would that be correct too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SisterHancock

Oh wait, yeah i think that would be ok actually. ごめんなさい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SisterHancock

"To hold up" would probably be a different verb. Maybe さしあげる?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haruue

傘を差します。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lalo_saurio

This sentence doesn't necessarily imply that "I" put up an umbrella

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