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  5. "よくえをかきます。"

"よくえをかきます。"

Translation:I draw often.

June 8, 2017

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

How would you distinguish this from "I draw good pictures" or"I draw pictures well" or something like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanarchist

While its contextual you'll usually find if the word よく comes very early in the sentence it probably means often where as if it comes closer to the verb it's probably an adverb and therefore means well/good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

The adjective for good is いいit only becomes よくin specific environs. One of them is before verbs. So 'I draw good pictures'. Would be いい絵をかきます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickRag1

LOL, it sounds like "I draw houses."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloJara3

If you want to say "I draw pictures well" I think it would be 私はえをよくかきます or if you want to say you are good at something it would be better to use 上手(じょうず) for example 私はえをかくことが上手です. Someone correct me in case it is not this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aisarezuni

I think based on context. It's like the two Kaku, one to draw and another to write. Japanese has a lot of this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveFolan

Im getting confused by えをかきます being translated to "I draw".

Wouldn't "I draw" be かきます (or 描きます) while えをかきます is "I draw pictures"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkaze

Agree. I'm confused why the need for "e o kakimasu" instead of just kakimasu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Denier21

It is because "kaku" can apply to writing or drawing. So the 'e' indicates that "kakimasu" refers to drawing, and not writing. "Kakimasu" alone doesn't provide clear context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonVer3

This could be solved by using 描きます, by this point we've already learned and used that kanji a few times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BokuDesuNe

Distinctive kanji only helps clarify writing, not spoken language. The usage of the object is helpful in this respect. I think what we can learn here is that the object is not always part of the meaning conveyed by the speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank747741

Have not seen the Kanji so far...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

The "e" means picture. Therefore you're drawing a picture. Kakimasu alone is the actual verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N1chope

I think they translated it like that because in English when you say "I draw a lot" it is already understood that you draw pictures very often. But yeah, literally speaking it should be "I draw pictures very often" or anything like that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

良く絵を描きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosVEEGM

(よくえをかきます) just so that you don't have to scroll up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Usually よく is written with kana alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanAmongMany

Thanks for the kanji in most phrases, but, i believe de character 良 isn't a very good fit for "often" since it means "good", making 良く more like "well" instead of often.

Therefore I believe it should be written in hiragana since it's already the most commom way to do it (よく)


[deactivated user]

    Yes, but DL does not accept that :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SquishMoos

    I always felt よく was more equivalent to 'usually/often' than ' a lot'. Is it both?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronCYA

    You're right and it's especially odd since we've recently been taught たくさん.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LewisPM

    'Often' is a better translation - 'a lot' is a colloquial replacement and can refer to quantity and time


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    And yet no 'often' is an option.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmanuelSp9

    I got it wrong for say "I often draw a picture". that should be right, right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

    In English it sounds better to say "I often draw pictures" so it's probably because you wrote "a picture"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edikan2

    How come it is "I draw a lot" instead of "I draw good pictures"? Where does the "a lot" come from?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koumori72

    The "a lot" is from yoku which can also be translated as "often"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Falcon198016

    良く絵を描きます。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    Usually よく is written in kana.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shingo293371

    Why isn' t it "I draw a lot of pictures" ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

    Yoku: Often, frequently (adverb) Takusan: A lot of (adjective).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rozieland

    So 書きます means to draw?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank747741

    Isn't it "to write"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeGompertz

    You're right: 書きます means write and 描きます means draw. However they are both pronounced かきます.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klgherkin

    ありがとうございます。わたしが「書きます」を書きました。ざんねんですね。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BokuDesuNe

    They are homonyms. Same pronuncuation, different spelling and meaning.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    Different kanji, same hiragana.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveOoi

    i often write should have been ok


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeGompertz

    The object of the sentence is 'picture'. "I write a picture" is... poetic to say the least.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

    よく vs たくさん?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.shazly

    What is the difference between takusan, amari and yoku


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex378624

    Based off what I have read in the comments Takusan = a lot (positive) Amari = too much (negative) Yoku = often (neutral)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sunsunsundle

    I often draw . → correct

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