"じゃあ、パンをください。"

Translation:Well then, the bread, please.

June 8, 2017

151 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FonzieSquirrel

Did anyone notice じゃあ、パン sounds like "Japan"?

June 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

There's actually a hilarious anime full of Japanese puns called "Yakitate Japan" about baking bread. Highly recommended if you like pun humor ( ^-^)

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/classypumpkin

Yo! I love yakitate japan! One of my first animes

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/echoAwoo

My first experience with Japanese puns was episode 1 of Ranma, the bread joke not 15s in

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyLongNum

Lol, here in spanish it's called "Ja-pan" since we call bread the same way!

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul678008

This isn't the place to weeb out.

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DCSD_Bryce

imo Weeb is more like someone who is obsessed with Japan without 'really' knowing anything about it culturally, watching Anime is no different than watching cartoons really

July 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Thank you Bryce (and others who downvoted Paul's comment). I wasn't "weebing out".

The fact that the thing I recommended happened to be an anime is completely irrelevant to why I recommended it in the first place. The title, 「焼きたて!!ジャぱん」, is a play on the exact pun (ぱん) OP noticed, and the series is full of jokes of a similar vein.

July 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VivianHuds1

I just watched the first episode, it was hilarious! It reminded of Nichijou in that it made something as everyday as making bread dramatic :-D

July 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jasperandrew

In my mind a "weeb" is someone who watches American shows dubbed in Japanese with English subtitles. :P

September 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VanNikkel

What if the person isn't a weeb and is trying to better their Japanese learning experience by hearing the tounge of native speakers, but still need the English subtitles to follow whats going on.

October 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/m4ti140

Telling people they're weebs in the comments for a Japanese course... Makes sense...

January 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IsaiaMonic

A weeb is someone who is obsessed with Japan, but who doesn't know much about the culture or just completely loose it for trivial or minor things that speaks against Japan. A person who is likes Manga and Anime and who puts a lot of time in it calls him/her self an Otaku. It does literally means "geek" or "loser" but its turning into the same thing like nerd. It use to be an insult but now it rather describes a group of people. Someone who knows a lot about japanese culture, loves the cuisine and likes to know more about the country is just a Japanophile, they know the up's and downs about Japan. But they are just fascinated.

November 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Aruzen1

Anime and manga are a major social, educational and even sales tool in japan, i would not be so quick to critique peoples tastes. Normally people fascinated by something react badly to anything that may bash their tastes, especially if ir was said to be mean or demoralizing to begin with.

We're all alowed to have opinions, and i get why nerding out to anime/manga without knowing anything else about japan can seem strange to some.

Ps. Otaku is a term used for anime and manga nerds, but it actually translates to "obsessed" Example Densha Otaku - train man ( man obsessed with trains)

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe264823

That sounds pretty narrow. Who's to judge what's trivial, or a minor detail.

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

Hey, I wasn't "weebing out". If I had directed OP to a hilarious Japanese stand-up comedy performance full of puns, would you have had the same reaction? No, I doubt it. So, stop thinking you're superior to people who enjoy anime, and get over yourself.

This isn't the place to be an insecure ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ so blinded by their hatred of anime that they wouldn't be able to see a legitimate, and relevant, recommendation if it walked up and slapped them in the face.

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/UrbanYeti

Sad react only

December 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasPlou1
February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/cebalanguages

And did anyone notice "pan" is also bread in Spanish?

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LoganBurden

Well it is a loan word. I think from portugal. Which has a lot of similar words to spanish.

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EduardoPac954096

Yeah,in Portugal/Brazil bread is called pão,which has a similar sound with pan.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasZorze2

The Portugal's ships arrived in Japan at 1543. Since then, japanese and portuguese exchange a little vocabulary.

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ronnyfauzi

Yes I did!

September 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/jayRose01

Umm do they not have bread in Japan back then?

September 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/IruHizu

Like most Asian countries, Japan's main carbohydrate supplement is rice.

November 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jendrej

They did not have bread as we know it, it isn’t traditional food there.

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecil164832

To be fair, the Japanese now bake bread that is uniquely Japanese, and in terms of quality is comparable to the French. As an example, consider the melon pan, which has no melons in it.

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus

Bread is largely a European and South West Asian thing, leading to some interesting names for it in the far East. In Vietnamese it is banh mi, wheat cake if I remember correctly.

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ZelieZazou

The French word for bread, "pain", is also very close. They all must come from Latin I assume.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia543869

FonzieSquirrel A good mem for that then i think, "i eat bread in Japan . lol ( Ja - pan)

June 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Eehlex

No. Unless the words and meanings are directly related, I rarely hear or go looking for English words in foreign sentences. Hell, I didn't even laugh at 'sechs' and 'gei' when I was 14 and learning German with my sniggering classmates. Even Mr I. P. Freely passed me by.

I've always been aware of this and found it interesting, as language and history are my specialities. (I'm told that Japanese 'pan' in this case is from the French, in the same way that 'koppu' -cup- is from the Dutch - for obvious reasons).

February 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SkySean

There's nothing with having a sense of humor, Captain 'tismo.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kerablub

You crack me up Fonzie

August 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mceoni

Lol !

October 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/YagamiHikari

is じゃあ~ like saying "in that case"?

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Kris_Lau

Yup

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobbPorter

Or "well then...".

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob634449

It's impossible to know. Nobody actually uses it here.

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceMabba

Am I the only one who thinks "can I get" sounds weird? I keep looking for "may I have."

June 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexandraJ919397

I think this really boils down to region and culture/subculture. In some places, this is seen as weird or rude. In my area, "may I have" and "can I get" are equal. But if you say "let me get" or "let me have" is extremely rude.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dirk390845

Me aswell. Seems a bit informal for my taste

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CindyRebec4

I completely agree that I think 'can I get' sounds rude, but I think they're using that translation since kudasaru (くださる) is when someone of perceived higher status gives something to you (or someone in your in group)

January 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/monsterfurby

The whole sentence "So, can I get some bread?" sounds like it would belong in a context where, having already asked once, the customer is reminding the waiter about their previous request. I don't think that's in line with the sentence's subtext in Japanese, though.

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

The implication of じゃあ is "in that case". So, rather than reminding the waiter, a likely scenario to use this sentence in is when you wanted to order something, but they've run out so you just go for bread instead, or when the shop assistant informs you that they have a special price on bread with every order and asks you if want some.

March 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecil164832

Except that in a restaurant context, you would NOT say kudesai. You would say onegaishimasu.

March 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

No, in this link which you also posted, a number of the answers suggest that ください and お願いします are largely interchangeable and that both can be used when requesting food, with お願いします generally being the more formal one.

April 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanDale3

Yeah, there is absolutely nothing rude with saying "Can I get" in the States. Now if you were to say "I'll take" like you're ordering at McDonald's, then yes, that'd be rude :P

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SherylHohman

Where I am in the States, it's Rude also. Must be more of a subculture thing. It may be more common with the youth - perhaps being seen less rude, or normal even, in younger generations than mine.

July 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilNolan1

I don't know if it's "rude" but it's very informal. It would be alright for McDonald's or Starbucks but definitely not a fancy tablecloth restaurant.

November 30, 2018

[deactivated user]

    No youre not the only one. Its stupid, and it sounds rude. I'm old, and I've never asked for something using those words, ever. It sounds very American to me (happy to be corrected there).

    June 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/my3bears

    I'm American and would never ask for something using that phrase. Is this supposed to be for ordering food in a restaurant?

    June 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Lorcans13

    I don't think it sounds weird or rude at all, I hear it all the time.

    June 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Paul678008

    Blame Merka.

    July 23, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Qermit

    Why do you use katakana to write 'pan'?

    June 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/euboat

    Katakana is usually used for words borrowed from other languages. パン comes from the Portuguese word for bread 'pão'.

    June 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JCH979

    Bread "pan" is also ponounced the same as Japanese in Spanish :)

    June 11, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhilNolan1

    And French.

    November 30, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/TaddSeiff

    More accurately, "pan" is a latin root. So yes, the Portugese specifically brought the word, but I think it is more correct to say that the word is written in katakana because it is a latin word, and is the same in most romance languages, Spanish, French, and of course Portugese.

    June 21, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaricWafflez

    Does this mean that the Japanese didn't have bread before European contact?

    June 26, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kornellier

    In European countries, bread has been the basic food, since it comes from the wheat, the main cereal here. In America, in contrast, they have got a lot of recipes based on corn, its main cereal (look at mexican "tortillas", or colombian "arepas"). And so, in most of Asia, the main cereal has been rice: just take a look at japanese or chinese gastronomy and see a lot of dishes containing rice, as the main ingredient or just as a garment. Moreover, the japanese "onigiri" are a kind of japanese sandwich but made with rice instead of bread, so we could say that rice was (and is still) the "asian bread" before the cultural exchange between Europe and Asia.

    July 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/CGATA

    Interesting! Thank you for sharing your extensive knowledge on the subject.

    July 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Paul678008

    More like the French word, "pan", because it's literally the same.

    July 23, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Daftex

    I belive they borrowed パン (pan) from French. You know, makes more sense if it comes from the same people that invented the "bagget"

    June 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/vicc_walker

    いええ、it doesn't have anything to do with who invented what, but with who introduced the term in Japan. “Pan” was introduced by Portuguese missionaries. Afaik Portugal was the first European country to be in Japan.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_Japanese_words_of_Portuguese_origin

    June 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/not_a_thing

    いいえ**

    September 23, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/vicc_walker

    Indeed lol, thanks! :)

    September 30, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/kai19154

    "Bagget"? Don't you mean "baguette"? ;) It's actually from Portuguese though. But Japanese does say "bagetto" for baguettes, so yes, there are some French loanwords too.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/TaddSeiff

    You are correct that pan ('pain') is bread in French, but it is also how you say bread in most other languages so your assumption that they got it from the French is wrong. It was the Portugese who brought the word.

    June 21, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/kai19154

    Not all Japanese loanwords come from English. Pan is a loanword from Portuguese. You'll see a good deal of loanwords from other languages than English, so if you know any other European languages you're in luck. Japan took many words from Portuguese and Dutch at first.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/honey

    I said "well then, please can I get bread"... So close, still wrong.

    June 19, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas804178

    Is this akin to there being a lull in conversation and then saying "right, let's eat!"? Not sure to interpret this phrase in context.

    June 11, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kris_Lau

    You're buying some cake and the cashier is like "The bread is good too!" and so you go じゃパンをください

    June 12, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/pwn_

    Perfect explanation, thanks for this.

    June 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/YrpItsMe

    You're at a restaurant and the waiter tells you they're fresh out of baby souls, so you're like, "well then can I get bread?"

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/serikos

    We're fresh out of bread

    June 28, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/kai19154

    Understandable, have a nice day

    July 12, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Yuuki-Yuki

    i found the english translation so weird, like パンください should be "Can i have the bread" instead of "can I get the bread," is it just me?

    June 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/jan.Kapa

    I agree with you, "get" is too informal here.

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/FonzieSquirrel

    Both are accepted by DuoLingo.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/I.gor1

    and "may" isn't. SMH.

    February 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ScissorMarks

    I wrote "Can I get bread then" and it wasn't having it.

    June 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/jan.Kapa

    Your "then" seems more like a "well, that being the case", sorekara thing. Jaa just means like right-o!

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/sarahtonin88

    Same :/

    June 27, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/sempernigrum

    Japan wo kudasai.

    June 22, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Francy-Chan

    Can I use "おねがいします" instead " ください" when I'm going to order in a restaurant or in a bar?

    June 22, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/jan.Kapa

    That would be weird but you technically could. Two ways this would come across-- promiscuous, or you're dying. It's way too polite for ordering food. You might scare someone.

    June 25, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    Welp, I usually used お願いします when ordering during my two years in Japan. I don't recall ever getting a weird look, neither has my (Japanese) partner ever commented on it.

    It could be the tone you use, but I don't think there's anything inherently weird about using お願いします

    August 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/AskarionVI

    Why is there no "ka" at the end of the question?

    July 16, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RobbPorter

    Its not really a proper question which is requiring an answer. Its more like a polite way of saying "bring me the bread".

    July 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Hugo_zerocool

    "Then" is not それから?

    June 8, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/AndreiOK

    Totally different actually. それから means after that or because of that. Literally " that after" of if you want "following that"

    June 15, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alastair938581

    This is a more casual way.

    June 11, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/tessniko

    I said "well then, can I please get bread" and it was wrong because the answer was "well then, can I get bread please". I don't understand why this is wrong. I understand that Japanese formal language has a much stricter order, but English does not, so why should a translation into English be so strict when the meaning is the same either way?

    June 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/GeneralVul

    I entered "Well then, please can I get bread" and was also told I was incorrect. Which is a little annoying as that is how I'd actually ask for something "Please can i get a coffee?". Oh well. Better luck next time.

    July 4, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    I think both of you should have been marked correct. This course is still a work in progress, so when something like that comes up, report it so they can add your permutation of the answer to the list of accepted answers.

    August 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/De_Selby

    I hear "pan wo kudasai". I was told that をis always read "oh", but apparently there are regional differences and some debate about this. Is it true that people say wo, with a weak w, if the word before ends in n? It's the case of this example and it's suggested here http://yesjapan.com/YJ6/question/769/how_is_really_pronounced

    July 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarlieGreeff

    Why isn't there a か? I thought か indicates a question.

    September 14, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    か does indicate a question, which is why there is no か here, because the Japanese sentence is technically a polite command/request.

    I know there are a lot of comments here, but your question has already been asked and answered a couple of times.

    October 8, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/ReidStiver

    Shouldn't "Anyway" work instead of so?

    June 10, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92

    So, was there no bread in japanese culture before contact with europeans? Given that katakana is used.

    July 3, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/nagyv1

    Why the answer is a question? Isn't "Well, I would like bread." means the same?

    July 8, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andi383868

    Because ください translates to "may I have" (or as duolingo likes to think, "can I have, please"), instead of "I would like." Therefore, the translation is "Well then, may I have some bread?"

    July 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    In English, they're both functionally the same, but in Japanese, this sentence is technically a polite request.

    It's getting a bit pedantic which is "more correct", but "Well, I would like bread" is more akin to a statement of desire (polite version of "want"). Arguably though, since the request is implicit, it should still be acceptable in certain contexts.

    August 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/SherylHohman

    Why does "shya" sound like "ya" ?

    July 15, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RobbPorter

    It's not Shi it's Ji because of the ". Jyaa.

    July 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JacobLamro

    Im confused as to how things are shown as questions. This is a clear question, but doesn't present that way. Can someone show me what im missing? Im just a beginner.

    July 20, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/JelisW

    A real question will have the particle か at the end of it.

    This statement lacks it because while it looks like a question in English translation, it isn't really functioning as one. It's exactly as if you were at a restaurant, and you told the waiter "could I have the bread please" with the full expectation that the waiter will, in fact, get you the bread. So it's an imperative, rather than a true question. The "please" is just for politeness' sake.

    July 22, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/VanNikkel

    Even though you are inplying to the waiter you want bread, one eould still 'ask' the requst in a question like tone because, who knows, maybe they are out of bread as well? lol. I still feel like this should be a question. Yet, I am only a beginner and have much to learn.

    October 12, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/LordOfTheAndain

    In English you make it sound like a question to be polite, but you wouldn't want the waiter to respond as if it actually were a question -- "Yes, sir, you could," but not go fetch it -- so it isn't really a question. And Japanese has other ways of making the request polite, so it doesn't need to make it sound like a question. Same function, different forms.

    November 14, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Shaun510462

    Isn't this supposed to be a question?

    August 5, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/monsterfurby

    Cultural difference. English-speakers often phrase a polite request as a question, while Japanese-speakers basically only use question markers for inquiries that can be responded to explicitly (i.e. with words), not for expressing desire to have something.

    Turning this into a question akin to western cultures could be understood as asking for whether or not it is possible, in theory, to have some bread (pretty much any Japanese-speaker would know what you actually mean, it would probably just sound a bit odd and western).

    That said, I don't know why they didn't allow "I'd like..." as a valid answer.

    February 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/pdl_86

    "Please can i get" should also be correct!

    September 8, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/GoldCrono

    I said "Then, I'll have some bread." I was marked wrong and the version Duolingo wanted was "Then, I'll have a bread." This should be corrected--we don't say "a bread" in English. "Some bread" is correct.

    September 9, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad208415

    Every other example so far would recognise "I'd like (some)" as a valid translation of "ください" except this one. Why is that?

    November 14, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/I.gor1

    "may" is wrong? I think not.

    February 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/CRODRIG25

    As a Native English speaker (and considering cultural norms as well), this section of learning threw me off, lol. "Can I get..." would be considered very informal, and almost a low class way of asking for something.

    Is this a common term you can use when ordering food?

    February 19, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    As a fellow native English speaker, I agree, and personally I favor translating this as "bread, please" or "~, please" instead.

    ~をください is a very common and standard way to order food, though naturally, there are also a great many acceptable alternatives of varying politeness. In terms of "class", in my experience, this phrase is most common at fast-food restaurants and cafes. People tend to go for the more polite versions at fine dining establishments, but that's not to say that using ください should be avoided there either.

    March 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nela692414

    "Well then, I'll have bread" was accepted but not "Well then, I'd like bread". However, i tried it in the sentence sakana o kudasai, it only accepted "I'd like fish" but not "I'll have fish". So what is really acceptable for kudasai?

    April 16, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    As many other people have observed, it largely boils down to whatever version of English you happen to be most familiar with.

    I believe, at time of writing (May 2, 2018), the Japanese course is still in Beta, so these kinds of inconsistencies are still being ironed out (and taking a while to do so, unfortunately).

    Personally I favor translating ください simply as "please", as in パンをください = "bread, please" and さかなをください = "fish, please", but I'm not part of the development team ┐(‘~`;)┌

    May 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Juan708965

    What is the difference between をand は when used as markers?

    May 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaLore9

    を is typically called the direct object marker/particle, and it indicates what the verb acts on or is applied to. In this case, the verb is a polite imperative (ください = "give me") so を marks what is to be given, パン.

    On the other hand, は is usually called the topic marker/particle. "Topic" is a bit strange for English-speakers because we don't explicitly have "topics" nor do we use the concept very frequently, it's essentially the anchoring point for the sentence and the context. Often it's useful to think about it as meaning "as for..." or "when it comes to...", though you should avoid including such phrases in your final translation.

    For example: ジョンさんは先生です = "As for John (=ジョンさんは), [he] is (=です) a teacher (=先生)"

    When は marks something as the topic, it often (but not always) overrides another particle, taking over its role and elevating the marked thing to the topic. In the earlier example, は replaced が which is the subject marker/particle, which indicates the agent that does the verb. In other cases, は can replace を as the object marker, often to emphasize a question, a negative, or a comparison.

    は is a very versatile particle, but it isn't all powerful. You can't use it with ください because ください is a kind of auxiliary verb which needs to act on a direct object.

    July 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/m.stratton

    "Well then, I would like bread please" is not an acceptable answer?

    August 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Hawkrising94

    Bread in italian is Pane and in japanese is Pan closer to italian then portoguese XD

    July 12, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Andi383868

    It literally is "pan" in Spanish haha

    July 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/deeptendu

    Pan(g) sounds like pain in french which also means bread. Any connection?

    July 15, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/tophyr

    Yes. Japanese borrowed the word from Portuguese, and both Portuguese and French derived it from the Latin word for bread, "panem."

    July 23, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/RobbPorter

    Nope. Lots of countries have a similar word for bread. It's actually from Portugese in this case.

    July 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/niscate

    じゃあ sounds suspiciously similar to the German informal interjection "Tja" which has roughly the same meaning ("Well,..."). Coincidence?

    December 20, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/branchoftruth

    "Then, I'd like bread" should work.

    December 22, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Eehlex

    'Well, bread then, please.' (British English) is not accepted, though the meaning is the same as the (American) 'Can I get...' Which is just not the way it's said here.

    I think 'may I have...' should be a translation option, as 'can I get' sounds weird, even coarse, where I live - unless you're speaking with an American accent (in which case we know you're actually being polite). ;)

    February 2, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/EyeZaiyuh

    I said "Ok, can I have bread." And it marked it wrong, I'm not really here to complain but if any one else was thinking the same thing I was thinking, I would say this is probably an appropriate translation for this word.

    February 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/RnnPedro

    I think "kudasai" means "please".

    We wanna translate "can I get" because that is the intention of the sentence, but I think the literally translation should be. "Ok, bread please"

    February 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/RnnPedro

    OK then, bread please!

    February 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/monsterfurby

    stands at the bakery counter with outstretched hands and open mouth

    February 14, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/wes_wallie7

    パン = pan.. First loan word from my language that I see lol

    March 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/DKC995785

    Most of the time, Duolingo allows me to translate a "[X] wo kudasai" sentence as "MAY I have some [X] please?" But on this question, and a few others, it marks my answer wrong because I said "May," instead of "Can." Is there something in the Japanese grammar I'm missing that would make "kudasai" mean "can" instead of "may" in some instances? And...just in terms of English grammar, shouldn't a sentence like this almost always be "may" (as in, asking for permission) rather than "can" (as in, the speaker is not asking for permission or to be passed bread, etc., but is merely inquiring whether it physically possible to acquire bread)? It seems like it would be only in very rare instances that the latter (can) would be used, and in terms of ordering food, etc., the former (may) would almost always be what the situation requires anyway. What am I missing?

    April 22, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Cecil164832

    You are right. Just report it and they might get around to changing it next year. Kudasai, BTW is more appropriately considered as "please." It is a request of the other to do something for you. One useful phrase to know: Motto yukkuri itte kudasai- please speak more slowly.

    April 22, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/multimediapanda

    I put "well then, I will get bread" is it really that wrong?

    June 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Cecil164832

    The sentence is a request for someone ELSE to give you bread.

    June 3, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Dabidi1

    It's difficult to have faith in this application when it keeps telling me things are incorrect when they are in fact not incorrect - 'okay I'll have the bread' is correct here; many translations could be correct here.

    August 13, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nicer11

    "Well then please the bread" I think there's a different language in need of my attention

    September 1, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Wubiii

    Japan: Pan Spanish: Pan Dutch: Brood English: Bread

    Polish: ChLeB

    September 27, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/rodrigaow

    Why is bread written in katakana? Also the pronounce sounds a lot like bread is said in portuguese: pão

    October 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Dabidi1

    Well then... Is not natural English.

    April 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/JelisW

    It is; just a little more confrontational and hm, snotty-formal than じゃ really is. I'd use it if I was deliberately trying to sound a bit dry.

    じゃ feels like somewhere between "well" and "um" in terms of fillers

    April 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/MacDeAltom

    Let's get this bread!

    June 4, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/IsaiaMonic

    So Japan is a well baked loaf of bread. XD

    November 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/royalt213

    This language is brutal.

    January 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ivy7green

    Ikr its very confusing look up any vids of it and everyones like "nonono please dont learn japanese if you think its easy" which is true considering it has, what, 50k individual characters but yeah japanese is not for the faint of heart XP

    February 12, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/NikorasuOwO

    F*** logic.

    June 14, 2018

    Related Discussions

    Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.