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  5. "こんにちは。"

"こんにちは。"

Translation:Hello.

June 8, 2017

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anaKaname

I learned from my teacher in Japanese that "konnichiwa" is used after 10 am while "konbanwa" is used after it gets dark.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colin429748

こんにちは means good afternoon while こんばんはmeans good evening


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blobfish201

Fo you by any vhance know what to greet people with before 10am ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

おはよう


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bhavish27

おはよう ございます ~ Ohayõ gozaimasu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyWaifu

P.s. The word for welcome is "yõkoso" spelt ようこそ. The "yo" is extended.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jop-V

I think you meant ō not õ, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vocaloid_stuffs

Whats the difference between õ and the o with a line on top (not on my keyboard lol)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

ō is o with a macron over it, indicating it should be pronounced for extra time. This is how we sometimes transcribe Japanese long vowels instead of explicitly showing the diphthong.

õ is o with a tilde over it. In Spanish, the tilde is written over consonants to show they have been palatalized. In Portuguese, it is written over vowels to show they have been nasalized. It has nothing to do with transcribing Japanese, hence Jop-V's comment that heysofia meant ō instead of õ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuBlife

It's just that sometimes, people who writes with a keyboard use "õ" because it's easier than trying to write "ō". I think the "real" way writing in romaji is with a "ō"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KentAllen5

How about どう いたしまして ? It's the same right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

No.

どう いたしまして is something you say as a response to ありがとう. That is, it is roughly "you're welcome" (or "it was nothing" or "my pleasure" as a response to "thank you").

ようこそ is "welcome" as in "Nice to see you!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anya_Dubinkina

Thanks for explaining)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian525841

Why does "は" sounds like "わ" when combined with "ち"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

It has nothing to do with "chi". "ha" is pronounced "wa" when it is being used as a grammatical particle that marks the subject of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyWaifu

"Ha" is pronounced "wa" in "konnichiha" due to old Japanese language (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_kana_orthography) . It is pronounced "wa" only in "konnichiha" so don't say "wa" in other words unless you are told to do so :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Wrong, ha is always pronounced wa when it marks the subject of conversation. But it IS due to old Japanese, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devon560977

It's also pronounced as wa in こんばんは


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heatblayze

That's because the topic is "This Evening" or こんばん. Same goes for こんにさは


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michi_3_3_3

Well, it's not pronunced as "wa" in "konnichiha" only. Also, when "ha" (wa) marks the the subject of a sentence. For example: "マリアさん は にほんじん です" . In that example: "は" is marking "Maria" as the suject of the statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thmsky

This phrase means "Hello", right? Can i use this phrase at night time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Kon = this. Nichi = daytime. Ha (as wa) = subject of conversation. So you cannot use it at night, and you're basically initiating conversation by saying "so, about today..." The listener can then finish the sentence by saying something like "...the weather is nice"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenPaul5

Actually, 今日は is short for 今日はご機嫌いかがですか, which means "How are you today?" So it does not always initiate a conversation nor does the sentence need to be finished, as it is already short for one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agtemis

At night you would use "oyasuminasai" or, less formally, "oyasumi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayners112

おやすみなさい means literally お(show honor like in おさけ) 休み (rest, break) なさい (verb meaning do)

So it literally means to tell someone to do rest. In english we would say "Good night!" So its more of a coversation ender than opener


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

Kind of like the (informal) English "Sleep tight!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akai_VAC

doesn't "konnichiwa" mean "welcome" as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyWaifu

It is a generic way to say "Hello" as well if you are not being time specific. But it's proper meaning is "Good Afternoon" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LennyTheHo

Yea this is why I keep getting "konnichiwa" and "konbanwa" mixed up;-;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koriander

Eventually youll learn that "Nichi" neans day and "ban" means evening. So one is Good day and the other is good evening. (Good night is completely different)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryCheng17

your explanation great!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pwallington

Would there be a difference between writing ko-n-ni-chi-ha and ko-(chiisai-tsu)-ni-chi-ha? (Sorry, no Japanese keyboard)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanDale3

I've never seen this done, especially for the very reason that we conveniently have a free-standing N character. But that's not to say it's never been done. You wouldn't normally see a small tsu before a character from the H-row either, nor would you typically see it after a drawn-out vowel, but you might see both at the same time in weird dialogue, like if a super villain were having a good laugh, it might be written as ハーッハハハー。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desiree695721

Isn't konnichiwa "goog afternoon"? Why is it "Hello" in here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjfwalker

It's a matter of the semantic, idiomatic hypernym - hyponym maps of the languages having only partial coverage of eachother.

Another instance of this sort of discrepancy in hypernym - hyponym mapping between Japanese and English can be seen with place deixis. English only has A) 'this'/'these' (proximal: describing a referent or referents near the speaker) and B) 'that'/'those' (medial/distal (ambiguous): describing a referent or referents anywhere else) whereas Japanes has これ/これら as co-hyponyms to A (so, again, proximal: near or with the speaker) but no co-hyponyms to B, only the hyponyms to (/things more specific than) B (that imply B) それ/それら (medial only: describing a referent or referents that is/are nearer the speaker's colocutor than the speaker and where neither party is closer to one another than the referent is to either) and あれ/あれら (distal only: describing a referent or referents farther from both the speaker and their colocutor or colocutors than the farthest of them are from one another). Both それ and あれ could be chalked up to the hypernym 'that' in translation to English just like the various time specific greetings could be generalized to an English equivalent of their semantic hypernym like "hello". And conversely, a translation of someone saying "hello" might actually be a translation of one of the semantic hyponyms of the original utterance because something at the same level of detail doesn't exist or isn't commonly used in the target language.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyponymy_and_hypernymy#Usage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Is-a


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrostDirt

It is a general way to say 'Hello' in day time i think. While you say こんばんは in evening.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_XxAntonxX_

This can mean afternoon as well right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

こん is literally "this"
にち is literally "day"
は is a grammar particle.

Literal "afternoon" is ごご.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/igeeko

In a question, the only answer was Hi and this is wrong because in Japanese there is no "hi" it all depends on the time of the day!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

But there is "hi" in English, and translation is also about usage, not just strict word-for-word substitution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Japanese_Neko

Why does it have a は (ha) at the end instead of a わ (wa) when you pronounce "KonnichiWA"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrostDirt

It has some historical reasons, but this is one of the exceptions when the は is pronounced 'wa'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

It's a historical quirk. When it's part of a word, は is pronounced "ha" and わ is pronounced "wa". But as a grammar particle, は is pronounced "wa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Supersannajin

Why is Hey not accepted, but Hi is? Doesn't it mean the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

They mean the same thing in the same way that "buh-bye" and "bye" mean the same thing. But one is a slightly less formal register than the other, meaning they would not usually be used in the same contexts.

The best translation would be "hello" or "good afternoon".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isawfulmoregirl

i learned from my friend that konichiwa means hello. is it both ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

Phrases and expressions don't translate one-to-one between languages, especially when the two languages are not the least bit related to each other the way English and Japanese are. Translation is about equivalent usage.

Literally, こんにちは is:
こん literally "this"
にち literally "day"
grammar particle [topic marker]

The best literal translation is "As for this day..." But that's not how English speakers greet each other. So we look at how Japanese speakers use the phrase, and the equivalent usage in English can be "hello" or "good day" or "good afternoon".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Betta372073

Hi, it keeps giving me error when I write Good day, Hello and in the correct answer that is what is suggesting Good Day Hello I do not understand why. I reported it as an error, saying that my answer should be accepted. Any comment? I also think Good morning should be accepted as translation....or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

Good day, yes.
Hello, yes.

Good morning, no. That's ohayou.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZinoviaV

Moshi-moshi (もしもし) is also plausible right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

I think that's only for answering the phone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oberon06

What is the small circle at the end of the word? Does this change if the word is capitalised or not eg. 'hello' or 'Hello'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

That small circle is how the Japanese write a period (full stop).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evan864558

Konnichiwa (こんにちは), is used for midday and afternoon, Konbanwa (こんばんは) is used for the evening and nighttime, and Ohayou (おはよう) is used in the early morning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Govind_Dwivedi

Why there is a circle at last???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

That's how you write a period in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarissadeAbreu

Can "こんにちは" be translated to "hi" or "hey" too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cactusowo

A little question here, ¿Why is the japanese dot a lil circle? Im talking about the 。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunflwerSe

I got this, And I put hello and hi because it said hi and hello when i hovered over the thing but i got it wrong, lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

Unless you're presented with multiple choice options to select, only give it one answer at a time.

こんにちは does not mean "hello and hi".
こんにちは can be "hello" and it can be "hi".

See the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zodiem

konnichiwa is not written as 'こんにちは'. it'll be right 'こんにちわ'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

I'm sorry, that is incorrect.

The grammar particle that marks the topic of the sentence is written は but is pronounced "wa". And こんにちは breaks down literally as
こん ~ this
にち ~ day
は ~ topic marker
So the greeting is literally "As for this day..."

わ is only used when it is part of the word itself, such as 私 (わたし).

私は寿司が好きです。 (watashi wa sushi ga suki desu)
私 ~ I
は ~ topic marker
寿司 ~ sushi
が ~ subject marker
好き ~ liked
です ~ is
As for me, I like sushi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Casper445998

I have heard ohayo gozaimasu, is "konnichiwa gozaimasu" ever a thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

No.

https://www.japanesepod101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-questions-answered-by-hiroko-7-what-does-gozaimasu-mean/

[You should be able to read the text without signing up, but in case the site gives you trouble, here is what it says:]

What Does GOZAIMASU Mean?
Learn what 'gozaimasu' means and why it makes phrases more polite

Lesson Transcript

Hi everybody! Hiroko here. Welcome to Ask a Teacher where I’ll answer some of your most common Japanese questions.

The question for this lesson is…

What does GOZAIMASU mean and why does it make phrases more polite?

When you say “Good morning” in Japanese, you can say “Ohayo” casually or “Ohayo Gozaimasu” to be polite. However, you cannot say ‘Kon’nichiwa gozaimasu’ or ‘Konbanwa gozaimasu’ as more polite phrases of ‘Kon’nichiwa’ or ‘Konbanwa.’

So what’s going on with this?

When you say “Good morning” politely, you say ‘Ohayo gozaimasu.’ It’s just the casual “Good morning,” ‘Ohayo’ with ‘gozaimasu’ at the end.

The word ‘gozaimasu’ is a very polite expression and can roughly be translated as “am,” “is,” or “are” in English.

The phrase “ohayo” comes from an adjective, “hayai” meaning “early” and it literally means “it’s early.” So, “ohayo” can take the polite expression “gozaimasu” after that to say it politely.

However, other greeting phrases, such as ‘Kon’nichiwa’ meaning “Hello,” and ‘Konbanwa’ meaning “Good evening.”‘ cannot take ‘gozaimasu.’ You don’t say ‘Kon’nichiwa gozaimasu’ or ‘Konbanwa gozaimasu.'

It’s because the phrases “kon’nichiwa” and “Konbanwa” have different origins from ‘Ohayo (gozaimasu)’. ‘Kon’nichiwa’ means “today (is)…” and came from the sentence, ‘Kon’nichi wa genki desu ka.’ meaning “How are you today?” Whereas Konbanwa’ means “this evening (is)...” and came from ‘Konban wa genki desu ka.’ meaning “How are you this evening?” So, the latter part, ‘genki desu ka,’ is dropped to make “Kon’nichiwa” and “Konbanwa”. They don’t come from adjectives like how Ohayo comes from “hayai” so these two greetings cannot take ‘gozaimasu’ after them.

Just remember that you can choose either the casual or polite version when you say “Good morning” but you don’t have to worry about the politeness when you say “Hello” and “Good evening” in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dwtsend

Any reason why the kanji equivalent (今日は) is being marked as incorrect? I understand that the phrase is much more commonly written in Hirigana, however for those of us that use IME, sometimes it auto-completes the Kanji (which is helpful in most situations, just not this one).

Is 今日は considered completely unacceptable for some reason I'm not aware of?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2523

Best I can figure, this early in the tree we aren't expected to know any kanji, and so the course contributors did not bother to add that option to the prompt's database.

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