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  5. "日本語でおねがいします。"

"日本語でおねがいします。"

Translation:Please speak Japanese.

June 9, 2017

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyumiUK

'Japanese, please' ...I'm trying, Duo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seetor

Don't forget the "in"! "in Japanese pkease" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eanxious

What's で for here? Thanks in advance :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tc3KDQp5

In this context, the で would be best described as "with" or "using". So the sentence would be "With Japanese, please" or "Using/use Japanese, please". Probably the latter would be best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eanxious

Ahh, understood. ありがとう :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gbytz

So the speaker is not actually asking the other person "to speak", is it? You could use this phase in a different context right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_IX

The speaker didn't specify so it could be the speaker is asking the other person to write, etc. in Japanese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMarkov

No, it's actually more like "In Japanese, please"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

Yeah. I like to translate "de" as meaning "via" or "by the means of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjfwalker

I translated it to 'Please use Japanese.' and Duo took it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Capucin1

"use" is not a possible option, how could you put it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Capucin1

I translated it to "Japanese please" and it worked '-'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelKremer1

I don't know, but I answered "In Japanese please" and it took that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJCatStack

I enjoyed learning that で is used for vehicles and language(been awhile so that may be inaccurate). I always think of it as the language being a vehicle for communication.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rishajiit

あっ、そうですね、どうもありがとうございます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny7866

What's the difference between おねがいします and ください?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KishiFishy

kudasai comes after a verb. onegaishimasu stands on its own, usually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki-kun

While it is true that you can use ください in combination with a verb if you are using the て form of a verb, it can also be used together with a noun in the structure [noun]をください.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

Not necessarily "kudasai" will come after a verb, just like Aki-kun said. I think Danny's question is more because of the sentence "mizu o kudasai" from the previous test. So, could it be written "mizu o onegaishimasu" and still have the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/entelexia

If that's the case, shouldn't きださい be used since 'speak' is a verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddie507353

Speak isn't used in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreiMene1

下さい 『ください』 I guess you usually use when is followed by a verb or when you are asking for something


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BriannaGoy1

Don't quote me on this, but I heard from someone that it is seen as rude to say ください to someone directly. Teachers use it to students because they're in a position of authority, so if you say it to someone else it can seem as if you're ordering them around and are implying that you're in a higher position. So it'd be better to say てもちえませんか if you're a beginner. . . But I could be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

Doesn't it mean "please give me"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex.shpilkin

“O negai shimasu” is the kenjōgo (humble polite register) of “nega|u” meaning “wish for” (and euphemistically “ask for”), with the honorific prefix “o” being a roundabout way of indicating that the listener is the object (like here; or, in other situations, the benefactor) of the action.

“Kudasai” is an (irregular fossilized) form of (what would normally be if not for the fossil) “kudasar|u”, one of the verbs for “give”, specifically “give to the speaker, who is of lower (下) social status”. The closest English word is perhaps “bestow”. See <https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Japanese/Lessons/Giving_and_Receiving>. These connotations are not to be taken very seriously for “kudasai”, though, as it’s pretty informal.

Of those two, you can ask for objects with either “N wo kudasai” or “N (wo) o negai shimasu”, for actions only with “V-te kudasai”, for means (like here) only with “N de o negai shimasu”, for people (on the phone) only with “N o negai shimasu”, for places (on the taxi) only with “N made o negai shimasu”, and so on depending on the situation. See e.g. <https://japanese.stackexchange.com/q/269/>.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arifira

Meaning wise: おねがいします is a humble way to say ねがう (to hope, to request, etc.) while ください is an imperative form of くださる (to give, to do something for the speaker, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BokuDesuNe

If I remember correctly, there is more to this. The base forms, おねがい and ください, are humble and imperative forms of request, respectively. Typically the length of the ending determines the formality of the request, as in くださいます, or even more formally くださいました. Culturally, I think the level of formality is determined by the occasion, while the level of humility depends on who one is speaking to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akairyuu1

I think おねがいします is politer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

お願いします it's used for when you ask for something in a humble way. ください it's not really rude but more like you are ordering something.

You will use お願いします when asking a friend to do you a favor

You will use ください when ordering a type of meal in McDonald


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaruHigdon

So, literally here you have the words "Japanese" "In" and "Please." There is no verb here. So literally this could be "write"書く or "speak"話す or "think"考える. If we want to accurately translate this it would be best to say "In Japanese, please."

Otherwise we would assume, and that is not good


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom-Sadler

Why would we not use 話します here? i.e 日本語で話します、おねがいします? As in "please speak using Japanese"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arifira

Japanese really loves to omit "unimportant" part that can be understood by context, in this case it's the verb. Now the verb can be "speak", "write", or any other relevant verb. So why does the sentence translates to "please speak Japanese"? Well, maybe because it's the most common usage of this phrase. If you want to include the verb, use ください instead: 日本語で話してください


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BokuDesuNe

I think your idea is correct, in that you could fill in the omitted information. However, I think おねがい or ください are used as adverbs, so the full sentance might read: 日本語で話しておねがいします。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dessertandtea

I want to talk like this one day!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZelieZazou

日本語でお願いします。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craaash80

This is what Japanese people will tell me, most of the time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugessfan

Duo, why don't you teach us properlly. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not_a_thing

What about simply "in Japanese, please"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Major.Mopar

Would "Please in Japanese" work too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crushforty

I just like how it rhymes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camostar34

Why isn't it 日本語で話してください?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

「日本語でお願いします」

【にほんごで・おねがいします】


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scott827167

"Speak Japanese to me" is totally acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telemetry

You could definitely use either in some situations, but it's not an accurate translation. There's nothing about speaking in the original (could be used for writing too), and if you wanted to ask someone to show off their Japanese skills by saying a few things, you wouldn't just say "in Japanese please" - that would be confusing

Point is you have to be careful you're not adding or removing information and changing the meaning too much when you translate, or you'll get marked down. Just try to translate the sentence or phrase you're given, as accurately as you can


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I wouldn't know how to write it, but I think that might require an object of some kind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lobato_r

Could it be "Please in Japanese"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PUfelix85

really? That vs it... come one. I get it maybe I just use them interchangeably in English wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheoRychet

I used "say" instead of "speak". come on!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

大丈夫! もうう。。。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FadyJaber

How about お日本語が話せますおねがいします ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m0oncherrie

It is in japanese, not speak japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAli825240

おねがいします please

で in

日本語 Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAli825240

Please speak -in- Japanese.

Should be the correct answer because of で !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARMY_In_Distress

I said "speak japanese please" and it was correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sicilechanson

Is「日本語にお願いします。」grammatically and contextually acceptable also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oufette

Why don't you use the word speak?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas64137

I would if i could


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

Wait. What onegaisjimasu means? Yeah. I know the meaning (translation) is please here... But, please someone break it down to me?? '-'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

お願いしま【おねがいします】 as such, is just an expression, but if you really want to know it has 3 parts お、願い、します... 願い means "desire", します is the polite inflection of する which means "to do", and finally お is just an honorific, the same you use for certain words like お水、お茶、お仕事...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DashAlex22

Why? なぜに? Why, Duolingo? 僕を日本語に pick on?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArcaneReno

This doesnt use the verb for 'speak' (hanasu), so, "In Japanese please" is a more literal translation.

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