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  5. "This tea is spicy, isn't it?"

"This tea is spicy, isn't it?"

Translation:このお茶はからいですね。

June 9, 2017

62 Comments


[deactivated user]

    WHO DRINKS SPICY TEA


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kazuto.kiri

    Nihonjin desu ..LOL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sorusan

    hahaha some tea can be spicy, not chilli spicy but spicy anyway


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkeays

    Spicy chai tea is delicious! Especially with a shot of espresso!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonapace

    KoninchiWHAT??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xyvyrianeth

    Not like Mexican food spicy, more like ginger or wasabi spicy.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeroTsunam

    As a mexican I can tell that spicy everything is very common when your mom forgets to tell you which pot is the one she usually uses to boil the chilli peppers or prepare the salsa.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WengeYu

    Duo the Owl does


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_IX

    Me, once. It was peppermint but tasted like pepper. lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nopinopa

    I do, it's pretty good.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterKovalsky

    Spiced != spicy. Important distinction.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weefyeet

    Is this programming language I see?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sxarp

    Why can't I use が? Like 「このお茶が辛いですね」


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoshingSam

    Cause it be weird to put an emphasis on the tea in this sentence unless you're comparing it to another drink/food... Tea is just a topic of conversation in this case.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mar.Sab

    Im just a beginner but based on my understanding, "kono" is already there, so "wa" is used since "ga" is not needed to stress the "ocha"..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarhanQure15

    From what I've learned, Ga is for the general concept of tea and Wa is for a specific tea known to both listener and speaker


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

    本は好きです means "I like books" (according to duolingo). It think it also depends on context, but it still goes against what you think.. I'm confused..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin121657

    Don't you usually use が before 好き?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FogsFles

    Using "は" in this manner will basically say "I like books but nothing else"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robotjing

    Why is it は instead of が? I thought は was used for things "in general," while が is more specific. so 水が好きです is "I like (this) water" and 水は好きですis "I like water (in general)." Is this wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZmeiZelen

    Is おちゃがからいですね also a correct translation? Can が be used to put the stress on 'tea' so that it gets the meaning of 'this very tea'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joaquin712956

    The recorded sound for "ね" ripped my ears.

    NNNNNNNNNEEE.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kase342

    Is ne used for "isn't it"? Why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

    Ne is like saying "right?" At the end of a sentence, asking for confirmation. Japanese uses this more than English does, and sometimes uses it to say that they're not 100% certain of what they said


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

    It's like "right?" or "do you think?" or "y'know?" or "eh?" and used in Japanese to include the person you're talking to or express that you're not sure or at least, that you're not making self-important declarations


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam596490

    'Ne' is similar to how Canadians use 'eh?' Its just a little sound that makes what you're saying more conversational. People tend to translate it as 'isn't it?'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyLittleEye

    "Isn't it" is a contraction of "Is it not?" Which ends a statement by inviting agreement from whoever we're conversing with. We could alternatively end the statement by asking "no?" which is how I interpret "ne" in this context - "Do you agree/not agree”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShyGuy219

    for some reason, it being called "spicy" cracks me up


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard.sa211753

    This "ne" means exactly the same as "né?" in portuguese. What a coincidence, almost the same writing


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TjarkEdel

    Germans also add " ne" for the same effect to their sentences


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroHRoGs

    Esse chá tá apimentado né?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guydht

    Can we really just leave the ですよ? What's the difference? (ですよね vs ね)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarlettKitsune

    Adding よ is adding emphasis. Like saying "the tea is friggin spicy, isn't it?" Mostly ですね is used over the other.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudioHer996800

    If you used just ですよ it would be something like "Duude, this tea is spicy!" (as in like, introducing information that the hearer doesn't know yet). If you use ですね it sounds more like "wow, this tea is spicy, isn't it?(therefore you're both acquainted with the tea's flavor and you're able to give out an agreement or disagreement answer).

    Overall, よ would be for emphasis on new information that the hearer might not know


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gayestgay

    I forgot the は lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hikyuu

    Weird spacing in isn't


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spencer595917

    First off, if it is spicy then it is chai. lol

    Second, it seems that adding "ne?" on the end instead of "desu ka?" is the say as in English we say "eh?" (Canadian emphasis. lol)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

    「このお茶は辛いですね」

    【この- おちゃは・からい -ですね】


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/299792458C

    British disappointment intensifies


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkyBunneh

    "このお茶はたらいですね" wasn't accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClayWhipp

    Spicy is からい not たらい


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toshibako

    Can anyone explain why ”このお茶は辛いですよね” was not accepted? 


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toke776507

    Probably a dumb question... why does it use the hiragana "からい" when it pronounces the kanji "つらい" (辛い)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thalasokoritso

    Duolingo just does that sometimes, it's nothing to with any Japanese rule


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shadowfae89

    The spicier the better. Chai is soooo good


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mitsukushii55555

    My dear, how in the hell a tea can be spicy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReaperGamez

    誰が辛いお茶を飲みますか???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/somelauw

    If you have trouble keeping them apart like me:

    karai is spicy, kirai is dislike


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamOoi85

    Chilli sauce expresso tea please


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HSaggepQ

    Oh we just entered that strange part of duolingo again...spicy tea I drank at the party I attended with my seven sisters the day before yesterday...it was cheap tea with expensive meat too!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabioyukihiro

    辛いお茶は好きます


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasonEM

    Why この instead of ここ? Or would both be ok? Thanks.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolfieSilv1

    Newbie Alert. Why is the question using な(ne) instead of か(ka)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v49mha2k

    First of all な is na. Ne is ね.

    Secondly, if you just used か, the sentence would be more like "Is this tea spicy?" In contrast, with ね, it's more of "This tea is spicy, right?" The first is just a general question that you'd ask without having even drunk the tea yet. The second is something that you'd say after you've already drank the tea, formed your own opinion on it, and wanted to see if others shared that opinion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandenStr5

    In this context ですね is like a dissapointed "isn't it?" If you use か it would be questioning whether it is in fact spicy tea or not. か is used at the end of a question to point out or clarify that you are asking a question, it's like a spoken question mark


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaueJ.

    こうちゃ wasn't accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Federico.Divino

    この isn't necessary in Japanese like the massive use we do for "this" in Enlgish


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin121657

    Why isn't it necessary. it refers to a specific tea.

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