"Hi."

Translation:こんにちは。

June 9, 2017

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikUaj

Add text to speech to phrases to make it easier to understand / check failed phrases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Voxel_

Totally agree, helps pronounciation too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RadityoK

Yes! Really need that for japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kunt16

How? I can't find how to enable it... In an older version of duolingo it was already enabled and I could hear the sentences I was constructing. I miss that feature!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giuseppe175091

こんにちは means "good day" not "hi"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not_a_thing

In that case, if possible, what's a proper and general (not linked to the period of the day) greeting? どうも?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You would basically always use a time-linked greeting. There are some casual greetings, but they're not appropriate unless you're very close to a person (like "ossu" or "ya", and both of these are associated with male speakers).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morphinometr

But "Hi" also not official. I taped よ but it says I am wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrandTortoise

こんばんは worked for me. I think it's just for general association.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ranggawiratno

Can "doumo" be translated to "hi" as well? I remember it being used as a pun somewhere in an anime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

I think your memory is right. 'Doumo' is used frequently.

But 'doumo' is ambiguous word, and it is difficult to define this word. We use this word as greeting. as 'hi’, 'hello', 'thank you' etc.

By the way what meaning the word 'pun'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Grey_3

Punは駄洒落です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/only_human

That seems very much like "bitte" in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gecast

In spanish, is something like "buenas", quite difficult to explain I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloNadar

I don't think that's the case, at least in my country, It is a Ciao or Aloha. It is use to say "Hello" or "Bye".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

(Ciao) Oo。(^∇^)oO(Aloha)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victor570339

Hi, What is that country? Im curious


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielRee4

Sort of a short joke, usualy a play on words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sora_Japan

joke is too hard for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insanenova

Why does は sound like wa instead of ha?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Grey_3

It's due to the historical kana usage (歴史的仮名遣い(れきしてきかなづかい)) は=わ、ひ=い、ふ=う、へ=え、ほ=お。 へ still retains its use as え, but not as often as は when used as わ. An example of what it looked like: けふ was read as きょう、おもふ=おもう、くゎ=か、ちやう=ちょう、et cetera. Japanese was, of course, simplified, so you don't have to learn a lot of this unless you want to be literate in old Japanese. It just made sense to keep は around as わ because it helped keep things clearer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

Is there a good book, website, or place that you know of where English readers could learn more information like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris753291

Thanks for the great explanation. So 'wa' was always a particle, and in old Japanese it was written as は and just stayed that way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Simple answer: when "ha" is used to note the subject of conversation it's pronounced as "wa" to make it easier to pronounce with lots of words.

Kon nichi wa = as for this day... The one being greeted can reply "...today the weather is good" So yeah, this basically means "good day"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

Because konnichiwa isn't a word, it's a sentance fragment. It's the first half of a longer traditional greeting, and over time people just stopped saying the other half.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy_Woods

Where's the audio? These pick blocks excercises are mostly guessing at this point without vocalizations!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyGo16

I've read that you say 'Konbanwa' when the Sun is down, is it right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iGotNo_Scope

essentially konbanwa is good evening and konnichiwa is good day (as in greeting) so yes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RockSobeck

Wasn't こにちは supposed to be good afternoon? O_O


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

こんにちは (konnichi wa) does mean "good afternoon", but it's the most common greeting (I think it's reasonable to use it from about 11:00-6:00ish).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eeyunn

So how come this uses the n hiragana and not the mini tsu hiragana for that "nni"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Correct writing should always use ん to double the N-syllables.

It's simply the only character that was already there and didn't need a workaround.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/only_human

This is a good place to mention that the Japanese word game shiritori uses the last syllable of a word for the other person's first syllable of a word and the game ends on syllabilic ん because no word starts with that hiragana character.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProSkill.report

Yes, I love to play Shiritori very much. It's really fun and can help us to memorize many vocabularies. Let's try Shiritori!
https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/31860498


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fooooo5

Finally understand!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiracleOny

Was I the only one that guest on this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zuza586339

For "Hi." only こんばんはis said to be right. If there is こんばんは、shouldn't おはよう be also good?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malikil

How does もしもし fit in with the other hello's?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline848163

You can use こんいちは to say: hi, good morning or good day. どうも you can use it to say: hi, hello, thanks, sorry, yes, you're welcome... everything depends on the context (Sorry... my english is very bad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tango_michael

They really should accept 「おっす」as a legitimate answer. ;)

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