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  5. "いもうとが七人います。"

"いもうとが七人います。"

Translation:I have seven younger sisters.

June 9, 2017

69 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brian6499

Wow, big family


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valencia25174

Sounds like mine, but I'm the 6th out of the 7 of us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah447403

I don't think any Japanese family is this big. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEcobra11

I just thought of those big Catholic Spanish faimilies like in the 70s and such...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmH299243

I thought of a Mormon family....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HikariJake

My family is. I have 3 siblings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

Can you say it in Japanese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarMarco4

Poor people have more kids here in South America


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schizo_Rhino

I am having trouble understaing the number part of this can someone write it in hiragana? I am not hearing 七人 as しちじん. Instead I hear it as しちに. Is this related to how people are counted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brian6499

When talking about a person or people (unspecified amount), its じん.

Example: 日本人 「にほんじん」

When talking about an exact number of people, its にん.

Example: 七人 「しちにん」

The first 2 numbers exceptions here: 1 person: 一人 「ひとり」 2 people: 二人 「ふたり」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rioscac

Do you ever say ななにん instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

Not really. They switch between pronunciations depending on the counter, and you kinda just have to remember it. なな is used for normal counting, age (~歳), and minutes (~分), among others. しち gets used for things like months (~月) and hours (~時).

Happens a lot with 四 (よ/よん or し) too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

Actually, when someone in Japanese lesson accidentally said ななじ, the teacher explained that 七時 is actually しちじ, but in radio before the news they sometimes say ななじ so it is not confused with 一時


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karim186436

Wait but if なな is commonly used and しち is used for months and hours why is it being used for normal counting in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEcobra11

I've heard みたり for 三人 too 、Is it common?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FardinKhan0

It was old way which is not used anymore. now just : 一人 (ひとり), 二人 (ふたり), 三人 (さんにん), 四人 (よにん) etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anakoz

にん is normally the counter for people i think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

Why is it "I have 7 younger sisters " instead of just "There are 7 younger sisters"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimmyHack

İt doesn't really make sense in English to just say "there are three younger sisters". Younger than who? The sisters are the subject of the sentence, but there is also an implied older sibling. Without any additional context we should assume that the implied topic of the sentence (the older sibling) is yourself. This is true for many of the sentences you will be translating, as it is common in Japanese to leave the topic unspecified when it can be implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark420722

Thank you very much for this comment. I was tied up in knots by the が particle and its interaction with います. Your statement that "sisters" is indeed the subject, but that the logic of "younger" implies that there must be more to the translation, helps me a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krellkey

In certain contexts "there are" would make sense: "I have a bunch of first cousins living nearby. Among them, there are 7 younger sisters... so I've pretty much learned every song in Frozen by now." Although you aren't necessarily referring to your own little sisters(s), you're still talking about your own family, so you still avoid honorifics with "sisters".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paartiaarti

I'm not sure and would like to know too but I wonder if it's something to do with the words used for your own family vs other people's families? So "chichi" or "haha" would only ever refer to your own father and mother - is "imouto" only your own little sister?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

Got it in one. You use いもうと to refer strictly to your own little sister when talking to other people. When talking about other people's younger sisters, you use いもうとさん. If you wanted to just say that the seven women are sisters in the same way you say "those people are siblings", you'd use しまい/姉妹.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akseli77

Sounds musical :^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki-kun

That's not a coincidence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

wait what

Can someone please explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AncientGuidance

Smile Sweet Sister Sadistic Surprise Service Shrek


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyGoat8

SMILE, SWEET, SISTER, SADISTIC, SURPRISE, SERVICE, СУКА БЛДЬ!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hillbilly19

It didn't accept my translation of "I am the luckiest man alive". Weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos890478

妹が七人います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne427822

Better make an anime about it then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne427822

Well this suddenly turned into a shounen anime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synchross

Shouldn't it be "I have seven "younger" sisters" instead of "I have seven "little" sisters"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderL2

At least in American English, they mean the same thing. "Little" sister is more casual and not my preference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frrost

I put younger and it worked. Both work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivalaashutosh

There are 7 sisters was not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boomerlady

Because it says "i have seven younger sisters" not "there are...."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leticia_SBerw

Why is it used が instead of は? How do I know when I should use one or another?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ena9219

あたしは妹がいません。妹七人がほしい。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DFo20

Was this somewhat musical to anyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily_Trujillo

What a big family...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lies513295

I would appreciate it if someone could transcribe it. I cannot understand the spoken sentence at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

妹(いもうと)-- imouto -- younger sister

が -- ga -- subject particle

七人(しちにん)-- shichi nin -- 7 people

います -- imasu -- polite present indicative form of the verb to be/exist, i.e "(there) are"

In full: imouto ga shichi nin imasu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NamiPants

If I were to say "I have one older sister" would I use 姉 (あね) or お姉さん (おねえさん)? Are there any major differences or is it preference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

You'd be using 姉.

Generally speaking, when talking about your own family members to other people you use the 'humble' forms (母、父、姉、兄、妹、弟)

When talking about other people's family members you use the polite forms (お母さん、お父さん、お姉さん、お兄さん、妹さん、弟さん)

When addressing your own family members, you use the polite forms if they are older than you; although sometimes people use the informal, shortened versions (かあさん、とうさん、etc) When addressing family members younger than you, you generally use their first names.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrescaranto

I suppose that is the reason Edward Elric calls his brother "Alphonse" and Alphonse call his にいさん, in Fullmetal Alchemist, right? To me, it never sounded like the お in お兄さん was being pronunced...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NamiPants

Whats the difference between "あね" and "おねえさん"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RVJioWts

あね (Ane) is a "humble" word so you'd only use it when talking about your own older sister to someone else.

If you were talking about someone else's older sister, you'd use おねえさん (oneesan).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chelsea72342

When i answered this question it said the answer was THEY have seven younger sisters?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IchigoKiyo

Would it also make sense to say: (私は) 七人のいもうとがいます。?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

+squints+ I'm not entirely sure, but that の particle makes it seem more like "I have the little sisters of seven people" which... is a little sinister XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

What is the word for have in Japanese? Why is have used in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telemetry

It's literally "there are seven younger sisters" or "seven younger sisters exist", with a bit of implied context about how they're the speaker's sisters. We just express the same idea using have in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DEcobra11

ある/あります for inanimate objects, いる/います for animate objects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrescaranto

Is there a way to refer to both younger and older sisters/brothers with a single noun? Would I have to recourse to using a も particle and listing both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JelisW

If you're asking for a term to refer to all siblings collectively, it's 兄弟(きょうだい). 姉妹(しまい)if you only have sisters. If you just want a term to refer to specifically older siblings of both genders (or only to younger siblings)... I'm sure there is a term but I dunno what it is, sorry ^_^"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrescaranto

So, 兄弟が七人います, would mean I have 7 siblings, whether older, younger, male or female, right? That's what I had in mind, thank you! ありがとうございます!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dragon676225

The correct reply to this is i'm sorry, or maybe i'm jealous wahahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coolmondude

It sounds like she's singing it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/javiero_mendoza

妹が七人います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cashewchikn

You know, in anime thats a harem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nezuko-Chan

wow busy parents


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ohnoesitsS

It sounds like a song to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNameIsNiu

I still don't get why it's が and not は in this example


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

You will usually see が used with the verbs いる and ある.

http://www.punipunijapan.com/arimasu-imasu/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesander650837

I can barely hear seven pronounced in the audio r.i.p

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