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"Where shall we go next month?"

Translation:来月はどこに行きましょうか?

June 9, 2017

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cocoshmimo

Fairly sure the は after next month isnt mandatory


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/britt.spencer

So is it okay to omit because it is implied when spoken? Would it still be acceptanble in very formal/grammatically strict situations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asiaspyro

It accepts it without the は now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aragnos1

No it doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t_a_h_i_r_a_h

Does for me, as of March 30, 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addison754642

It did not for me. 2017.06.27


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/asiaspyro

That's strange, I swear it worked before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

Same here, told me I missed a word when I omitted the "wa".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azrael89

It works now 22.08.2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeMumaw

Required the wa for me. 1-22-18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/medibean

Works now Feb 11, 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucidusAtra

What if you're talking about time travel in fiction? Travelling into next week? 来週にいきます would be acceptable in that case, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ever2662

It's still not fixed though, is it? Next week means something different if it's August than if it's June, time-travel aside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kotomidearu

どこには行きましょうか feels so right though. I thought に and は could be used when the time is the topic of the sentence....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

But what part of that sentence indicates "next month"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ForgetUmbrella

Maybe you forgot to mention the"next month"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterWalpo2

は can't be applied to words like どこ、何、だれ, you can't have the topic be something unknown.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alekstg

I believe the particle は following the particle に is used to indicate a negative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gasezefe

Is the 一緒に (いっしょに) implicit here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

"Issho ni" translates to "together", which isn't in the original sentence.

It's the difference between; "Where should we go." And; "Where should we go together."

The first does usually imply that you're going together, but not necessarily.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

But without it how can you tell it's asking where should we go, not where should I go ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liam315

"Together" might not be in the English sentence but it's definitely implied. The question is whether the same is true in Japanese. Does the omission or inclusion of 一緒に have any affect on how natural the sentence sounds to a native speaker?

In lingodeer 一緒に is used a lot more liberally in these types of sample sentences, which makes me wonder whether Duolingo is simplifying it for this exercise, whether lingodeer is overly complicating it, or if both are as correct/common as each other.

My guess would be that because ましょう (let's/let us/etc. ~) is used, the "we together" is implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HapaxHypatia

Ugh, how annoying. I got everything right except the extra う in 行きましょうか :-( I wish they didn't break the japanese words up into weird bits in the pick a word questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariana897570

Right? The exact same thing happened to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynlee890792

Could 来月 'に' also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndiPopp

No, the particle に always refers to a fixed point in time. Words that represent changing points in time like today, tomorrow, last week or next month, cannot be marked by に.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adwins

Can i put "raigetsu" after "doko ni"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addison754642

I think so. Since it is an adjective, it can go anywhere. I think it is most natural to go in the beginning, though.

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