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  5. "あきふくをかいます。"

"あきふくをかいます。"

Translation:I will buy fall clothes.

June 9, 2017

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil113755

"Fall" in this context is the American word (for lack of a better way to describe it) for Autumn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBanci

Oh wow, didnt know fall was autumn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IoliMoira

Oh my really? I like using autumn better, fall sounds pretty bland to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElderHinrichs

It's called fall because everything is falling. Leaves, temperature, grades, motivation...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennifSoledad

Yes but it's easier to remember how to change the clocks during daylight savings time if you can say that one should Spring ahead and Fall back.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariana897570

Better idea: eradicate Daylight Savings! Down with losing an hour of sleep!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feltarno

Yeah I was unaware of this, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeqiHan

秋服を買います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eromeon

So, the glyph 秋 means something like "cup of fire"? It's or poetic or alarming.

Where I live, there are no seasons. Those who live where autumn exists. Is it the season of wildfires?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheshire.catlin

There aren't many wildfires in autumn, no. That's usually during the summer (June - August or September in the northern hemisphere). But where I live, the leaves on trees change colors from green to yellow, orange, and red - so they look like they're "on fire"! They're extremely beautiful! Also, it is the time of the year when people start building fires in their home fireplaces (if they have any) to stay warm! Or they create bonfires outside to sit around, talk with friends, and eat food!

I looked up the kanji, and the first radical translates as "grain" or "rice plant". In Japan, there are 2 rice seasons, and the 2nd one is September-October or August-October depending on the region. But if it did read as "cup of fire", maybe it was because of the irori (sunken hearth in Japanese homes), and that they started lighting fires there more frequently during autumn?

I did a quick Google search and found an article about an old-ish tradition called "yakihata" where they would burn forested areas to create land for agriculture (and use the ash for fertilizer) - maybe that's where they got it?

It's a really interesting question! I'd like to know how they got the kanji!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

Notice that most of the Japanese Kanji are borrowed from China. In very ancient time this character is written with "禾"(grain) + "火"(fire) + "亀"(turtle). The reason for the appearance of "禾" is obvious, but why are there "fire" and "turtle"? That might because in ancient Chinese people burned turtle shells to predict if the year is a harvest year. But 亀 was created by drawing a turtle, and some people think that the ancient character seems more like a locust, which eats people's rice. Ancient people drive locusts away with fire, so the explanation is also reasonable. Anyway this seems to be a controversial issue and the 亀 is too hard to write so it disappeared after.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtBurnap

Yakihata agriculture 焼畑農業 (やきはたのうぎょう) (https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%84%BC%E7%95%91%E8%BE%B2%E6%A5%AD?wprov=sfla1) known in English as slash-and-burn agriculture (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash-and-burn?wprov=sfla1) is a traditional type of agriculture that has been and continues to be practiced in many parts of the world. In Japan and many other Asian countries, in places where the land and water supply make it possible, rice cultivation in paddies 水田耕作 (すいでんこうさく), has been a traditional more intensively productive alternative. According to the Japanese Wikipedia article cited, slash and burn agriculture was also widely practiced in Japan in areas not suitable for rice cultivation, from perhaps as early as the Jomon period until the end of the 19th century. After that time there has been some continued use in the Tohoku region of Japan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtBurnap

Yakihata agriculture 焼畑農業 (やきはたのうぎょう) (https://ja.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%84%BC%E7%95%91%E8%BE%B2%E6%A5%AD?wprov=sfla1) known in English as slash-and-burn agriculture (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slash-and-burn?wprov=sfla1) is a traditional type of agriculture that has been and continues to be practiced in many parts of the world. In Japan and many other Asian countries, in places where the land and water supply make it possible, rice cultivation in paddies 水田耕作 (すいでんこうさく), has been a traditional more intensively productive alternative. According to the Japanese Wikipedia article cited, slash and burn agriculture was also widely practiced in Japan in areas not suitable for rice cultivation, from perhaps as early as the Jomon period until the end of the 19th century. After that time there has been some continued use in the Tohoku region of Japan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zachary137372

Regardless of the actual origin, I see the first part of the kanji as sort of like the tree kanji with an extra line above it, and then the fire kanji. So it's sort of like "the tops of the trees (leaves) on fire (changing colors)". I know that's not actually the origin, but I find it a good mnemonic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Please keep in mind that radicals have in the most of cases nothing to do with the meaning of a kanji. Sometimes it can do, but usually the left radicals is the simbolic ones, and the right radicals is stronger for the pronounce.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

UK: We call it Autumn, inspired by the French word 'Autompne' and by the Latin word 'Autumnus'.

USA: We call it Fall, because the leaves FALL down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loopendend

a u t o m p n e also autumn is frequently used in the USA as well, to me it sounds almost childish when someone says fall


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaleph01

But "automne", without "p".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

The variant with "p" was valid archaic French. (says wiki)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennifSoledad

USA uses both interchangeably. However, when speaking of things that are fall-like, we would only use autumnal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arsaccol

Wrong because I used "clothing" instead of "clothes"? ;-;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lobrow1

Duo users are global. "Fall" is not in common use outside of American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamScott794079

Is this fall over or american autum?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ever2662

American autumn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mlaaja84

Please accept the word autumn here as well, thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve851332

It's interesting how google translator translates: 秋服 (あきふく)= autumn clothes 秋の服(あきのふく)= fall clothes

Would it even be acceptible to write it with の?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

It doesn't seems a jukugo to me, so I think it's perfectly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/randomBaguette

it is autumn and not fall I presume


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Red859243

Just use Autumn. It's a much better word, and it's less confusing when learning a language. This is coming from an American by the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catlinbelle

I like this sentence because it uses the first half of my name. ;w;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samsaradog

I get that in Japanese present and future depend on context, so why is "I am buying fall clothes" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albur_Godwin

As far as I know, Japanese has a notion of present continuous, which can be formed using the te base + いる (iru); since this specific conjugation is not used here, it seems reasonable not to interpret the sentence as describing a continuous-tense action. See here for some information about it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_and_progressive_aspects#Japanese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexTM-IAMDEV

Fall clothes... I was expecting something like 秋の服. Am i wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul826086

Can we get actual English terms.

Also proper sentences


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheshire.catlin

I can't see how this sentence ISN'T a proper sentence, or an English term? Do you mean a British/UK English term? Because this is American English and it makes sense. "I buy fall clothes" is a proper sentence. It means, "I buy clothes specifically to be worn during the autumn season" and makes as much sense as "I buy winter clothes" or "I buy summer clothes".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

I hoped "I bought clothing for fall" would work.. But no such luck... Clothes/clothing fall/autumn I've not bought "fall clothes" before.. Just goes to show.. Different ways of speaking.. same general language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShawnGates6

'Bought' was wrong because the sentence is not in past tense. 'Will buy' would be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HkyK4

"clothing" is a noun. "clothes" is a noun. They are equivalent. . "clothing" as a verb is archaic and probably biblical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lnklw

What are "fall clothes " exactly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pii-chan

As a Japanese,I was confusing by the Japanese voice. I heard that "I buy clothes in Autumn" not "I buy 「あきふく」". I think a little bit difficult to understand the Japanese voice. But I continue Duo(Japanese) because it will be a good learning English for me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ema439209

I agree that the voice says aki_fuku and not akifuku. The first meaning that I buy clothes in autumn and the latter meaning I buy autumn clothes. But the nuances of Japanese pronounciation are probably not possible for the computerized voice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albur_Godwin

Actually, I think the error lies not in voice synthesis, but in the input sentence itself: I notice that あき and ふく are analysed by the dynamic translation tool (when you mouse over them) as separate entries! (Which confused me, as I was not aware of the existence of the compound noun あきふく.)
Somebody should correct this, if possible, may I suggest.


[deactivated user]

    Its a little annoying that Americanisations such as 'fall' are accepted in favour if English words like autumnal.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reece66734

    秋服を買います。 Not accepted and won't let me report it...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianKilik

    Could "あきのふくをかいます" be also correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynnwithnoh

    Why is it simply said as 'aki fuku'? I feel like there should be some kind of particle in between the two words.

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