https://www.duolingo.com/byeolstudy

think of the learning value, not the superficial achievements.

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just a word i wanted to get out, that sometimes what we hang on to doesn't really matter that much.

in spanish i was a level 21, almost level 22, with 18,248 xp. but as time went on, working on duolingo became more of a "let's earn more xp" game, which is good itself yes, but in the end i lost sight on what the true goal actually was: learning the language. not exactly achieving fluency -- those are two different things.

at school, i'm in spanish class (and know everything in the curriculum). it's a dilemma: because i'm too good for the normal class but not good enough for the immersion program at our school, which is mainly full of native spanish speakers. i had neglected duolingo and come back with a disappointing 44% fluency (versus the 60% i had), 0 day streak, all my lessons down at two bars. and it made me realize that these are incentives, but not necessarily your main goal. i made the mistake of becoming blind to what my true goal was: to genuinely learn the language, and in such a way to be more educated on different cultures in our world.

so, i made a difficult choice and reset the spanish tree. i have tested out of the extremely easy lessons and focusing on the ones i have faltered on, because i had just glided past them for these superficial "achievements".

i guess what i'm trying to say is that it's good to take a step back and remind yourself what you really wish to achieve. and don't lie to yourself -- if you don't see it happening, it's time to take action. because out of everything, you don't remember the numbers. you remember how you learned a certain language through duolingo, and not the number of lingots or what level you were. we remember the great achievements of people, and not their test scores or salaries.

stay genuine.

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SarahK7174
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Thanks for that thought. ; )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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I appreciate the sentiment in the title, to be sure. Clearly you're the only one in a position to know what it is you need to focus on and what's holding you back, and if this helps you get past those things to get your focus where it needs to be, then excellent. However, I really can't say I understand how the tactic you've chosen furthers that objective in general. Nobody could dispute the case that XP counts, levels, skill colors mean nothing of themselves, but that means if you need to learn something yet, you just focus on it. You don't go start over from the beginning so you can get the feeling of completing "new" skills again and have the pleasure of turning them from grey to gold. You just practice skills that already show up as gold until you know them and you know you know them.

I also think, although I can't prove, that trees are more useful having done all the skills, as this seems to result in more translation into the target language. I have to imagine that this effect is removed upon resetting, although I obviously don't know that either, the translation mix being one of the great opacities of Duolingo function.

In any case, best of luck in your learning, and I'm glad you're back to focusing on the essentials!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissCamden
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considering the extremely low percentage of users that actually complete a tree, not that many people are going to be able to access the more useful content.

i get your point, i do. but as far as i am concerned, it's a psychology thing. deleting my lv.12 russian tree was the right thing to do. i feel a lot better about russian having started from scratch. practicing golden skills just feels plain wrong. i can never do it for long, i always end up neglecting the tree for months instead. both my german and swedish trees are goldless. that's ok, i'll regild/finish them whenever. in fact that's probably how i'll get to level 25: gild the whole thing, let it decay, regild, rinse, repeat.
but i knew that keeping my russian tree and just letting the skills decay wouldn't work. i needed to give up on the tree in order not to give up on russian. so i did.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Fair enough, obviously. Undoubtedly my blasé disregard of Duolingo's not-so-subtle nudgings was strongly influenced by my initial experience of flitting through the Russian and top third or so of the Catalan trees, having them be all gold (this is before degilding speed ramped up), and wondering how to go about finding the parts of the Russian tree I actually didn't know yet while realizing I'd gotten way ahead of myself in Catalan. Perhaps the ideal environment for never having a thought that things being gold had even a sliver of meaning! (in the strange realm of psychology, I actually don't find gold trees very appealing; I apparently much prefer more varied color schemes to that monotony!)

Duolingo seems to use the same skill strength algorithms for Spanish as it does for Russian. This, to me at least, is transparent madness. Learning every new word in Russian is many times harder. I may just be a slow learner with little Slavic aptitude (in the realm of not closely related languages, Hungarian has stuck much more easily for me), but I need to see those words many times more — and in a much shorter period of time — than I think Duolingo degilding would ever get me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/byeolstudy
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hello! i guess my mindset behind that was to start afresh, like you mentioned, with a totally different outlook :) i have tested out on the majority to truly learn the bottom quarter-ish portion of the tree. even if i review each and every lesson, it's just not the same for me -- suppose it's different for everyone... and yes, i do agree with the translation thing; i might have forgotten about that (oops).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benhamil

This is good advice, and kudos for resetting the tree and staring afresh.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasGabr13

Superficial achievements are what get me through the day!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heike333145
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I love your insight. Thanks for sharing -- and keep up the good work!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/estudianteMTI3

Very good advice. And that was actually the purpose behind the new health feature that Duolingo is working on because it keeps users from completing too many new skills without doing some practicing first. Unfortunately I think they might have overdone it a little and locked it down too much, because a lot of users hate it. But hopefully they will work on it a little bit more and roll it out for all users soon.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bella2reyes

Thanks for posting this, btw I LOVE your profile picture

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/byeolstudy
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Wow, thank you! I really love YOURS too! (I love pineapples to the moon and back ahh they are amazing lol)

1 year ago
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