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  5. "さ来週もれんしゅうしましょう。"

"さ来週もれんしゅうしましょう。"

Translation:Let's practice again the week after next.

June 10, 2017

130 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HikariNoAruji

There are so many ways to translate this sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lottezanden

Shouldn't "Let's practice again the week after next week" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PholaX

Non-native here. I believe, that week is called "the week after next". Like "the day after tomorrow", it's a stale phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I assume you mean "set phrase", not "stale".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thekeeeeeeeg

I have honestly never heard anyone say "week after next" before Duolingo, but that might just be me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

Pretty common actually however I'd prefer saying 2 weeks from now. Less complicated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

I always say "next next week"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadashi3750

I have said it, but then maybe I am just old :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia543869

I don't hear that a lot. People usually say , for example, "let's go somewhere in two weeks time." Sometimes i hear the word fortnight being used .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothertazn

"the following week" is much more natural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

Some people (me included) might think you're saying "next week" with that phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamVandenB3

This one is broken ... The 'correct' answer changes even if you fill in the one it gives you ... And there are a few possibilities to phrase this in english and it would be correct and it keeps disregarding it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas86239

I have the same problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas86239

Ah, I kept writing "the week after next week" when the app was expecting "the week after next".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkaze

How do you pronounce that "week after next"? I cannot understand the audio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bobby322520

Where does the word "again" come from. I got it right but left out again. ..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solomai

Because of the も. It implies a repetition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rioscac

It should be "let's practice the week after next also"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"also" sounds weird in that position. I think the most natural phrasing is "Let's practice the week after next week, too." It wasn't accepted, so I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanicaBescae

Wouldn't that be さ来週まだ練習しましょう?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I think you mean また。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

...No? まだ is an adverb, not a particle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

According to HiNative, また is "again" while まだ is "still."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulesCC91

That makes more sense because thats how Ive seen も used in other sentences. But "again"? I know Ive seen them use another word for that, like また, but they're probably just using "again" so it flows better in english?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Igor.Zaytsev

I tried "Let's practice also the week after next" -- marked incorrect. While "again" is more natural and the meaning is pretty much the same, I feel like for practicing translations "also" is more precise while still being grammatically correct. "Again" is stepping on the また foot (like maybe: 再来週、また練習しましょう).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Makise11

Week after next? Give me a break.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

I don't know why you're down voted?

Seriously, aren't they missing a "the" here?! "the week after THE next"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k8bit

"The week after next" sounds more natural in English. "The week after the next" is not a phrasing I've ever heard before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

It's the opposite for me. I've never heard "the week after next" and only "the week after the next", and I would actually completely ignore the phrasing and go for "in 2 weeks".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevKingoftheSea

"In 2 weeks" doesn't necessarily carry the same meaning, though. It usually implies the same day of the week (i.e., Saturday to Saturday). On the other hand, "the week after next," could mean the start of that week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

Not the case for me. "In 2 weeks" can be taken as the start of that week as well. It might just be my dialect, but either way, it's the most natural option for me here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

Hm, idk, that sounds really odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivanpopjovanov

"Lets practice again the week after the next one" is wrong for some reason


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleetha

Please explain what "week after next" mean here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lazar.ljubenovic

It is the week after the next week. So not this week, not next one, but the one after that. Not first, not second, but third.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitoriagabs

Are you sure about that? If it's true... it changes everything


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Not the next week, but the week after that.

Easy to understand!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jugglejunk

Here is the answer gave which was accepted. I'll also explain why I phrased it like this. 'Let's also pratice the week after next' the let's is because of mashou this suggests a proposition of some sort, then mo as also, practise for renshuu and the week after next to be on the safe side. Duolingo sometimes accepts it also if the sentence is a bit weird. Perhaps it would also accept the week after the next (week) or the week after the next one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I think that's fine (assuming you spelled "practice" correctly; you misspelled it in your suggested phrasing).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Practise isn't a misspelling - it's British English spelling and used in the UK, NZ, Australia, and probably other commonwealth countries as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

@jugglejunk didn't type "practise" in their suggested sentence; they typed "pratice", which is what I pointed out as a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NIPPONWANI

"The week after next, let's practice again." is incorrect lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

Because that's not a correct sentence unless you're Yoda.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Seems grammatically correct to me, though it might not be the way most people phrase it. Similar references to time are pretty flexible in where they can be placed in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stordoff

Why not? Sounds fine to me as a British English speaker - same as you might say "Tomorrow, let's practice again".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

I always want to phrase it "we should practice" instead of "let's practice". Is that wrong? Or should I flag it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TurianSniper

I think "should" has an implication that "let's" doesn't. "Should" implies that you think practicing is the correct course of action, an implication that doesn't exist with "let's"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor857144

I strongly disagree. As an American we use "should" to express our own opinions when we don't know what the other person thinks. Should means you believe something is true, but it is uncertain what the outcome is, so it's used when making plans when the other person might not be on board.

We only use let's with close friends or with children. "Let's" assumes strongly that the other person will agree or doesn't have a choice. It's used when you don't want to give a command, but you know the outcome already.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Should implies obligation and that is a different verb construction again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justanoddone

Could fortnight count?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

"let's practice again in a fortnight"? I mean, it's pretty archaic... Say "fortnight's time" and you'll have convinced me there's a renfest nearby.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

It's not archaic in British English. But "in a fortnight" means "in two weeks time"; if they don't accept "in two weeks" they shouldn't accept "fortnight" either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"In two weeks" is accepted, so a case could be made for "fortnight".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoluXian

Guess duolingo doesn't like fortnite. :^)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

Do you want to practice again in 2 weeks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

"the week after next" is similar to "in 2 weeks", but they're not identical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

I don't agree really. Something is happening the week after next, to me, is just a long-winded way to say that something is happening in 2 weeks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucja4869

Is "do you want to practice the week after next" acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

No. It's not a question, but rather a volitional statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Starbornx

再来週 (さらいしゅう)練習ましょう。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

You forgot the も after 再来週.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeranoJoe

Since the "mo" is placed after "raishyuu" can the sentence be translated "let's practice the week after next also" (aka 'mo' describes 'the week after next')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You're right, and your answer might be accepted if you submit an error report. "Again" sounds more natural, but "also" is more literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yzuzqWGo

Duolingo doesn't accept 再来週も練習しましょう as the answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor857144

So this is the confusing part for me. I'm not sure if the people who make this read the comments, but this is very nuanced aspect of English.

"Should" states a strong belief, but uncertainty in the other person. "You should go to the doctor" means I KNOW you should go, but I DON'T KNOW if you will, or if you agree.

"Let's" sounds more passive, but is actually much stronger. An American would only say "let's" if they already knew the outcome. This means speaking with a very close friend "Let's get dinner" or with a child "Let's play a different game". When you're saying "let's" you don't want to give a command, but you're assuming the other person will agree with you, or doesn't have a choice.

Is this distinction correct in the Japanese here? Is the shou form one step beneath a command? Or would "should" also be acceptable? Because currently it isn't accepting should.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadashi3750

The shou form is a suggestion, and even then so it is indirect and it includes the speaker. Like Let's go. I suggest that we both go not you should go. There is a please do something like a request and a you must do like a command which are very different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor857144

I understand it’s a suggestion. “We should do this again” is also a suggestion. “Let’s do this again” is more of an assumption. So I’m trying to distinguish between the two in the case of this verb form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

ましょう is as strong in Japanese as "let's" is in English. There is the same assumption that what the person is suggesting will be done. It's like a softened command.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor857144

Thank you! That’s what I wanted to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adelheid_G

"Fortnight" is not accepted. Bad Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordOfTheAndain

"Fortnight" is specifically in fourteen days, but "week after next" could be as early as in eight or as late as in twenty, depending on when it is said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

"let's practice again in a fortnight"? I mean, it's pretty archaic... Say "fortnight's time" and you'll have convinced me there's a renfest nearby.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

To be honest, I rarely hear people say 'the week after next' in conversations. It's usually just 'the week after', but of course it's wrong here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ninelives900

This might be me, but this sounds like a tongue twister


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrishVMall

I don't know if this is a dumb question, but ましょう come before れんしゅうし? Mashou is referring to an object and would come before a verb like renshuu, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

ましょう (mashou) is part of the verb, so it will always come at the end. 練習します (renshuu shimasu, which is the verb "practice", becomes 練習しましょう (renshuu shimashou) when you want to say "let's practice".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

This should be 「さ来週、またれんしゅうしましょう」, right? It's not "let's also practice next week," which is the literal translation of the current sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamYon4

两个星期后再俩练习


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elininja1337

I got marked wrong for using kanji instead of kana.... "再来週も練習しましょう"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayceeDela

Interesting. I wrote, "let's practice the week after next as well." Instead of, "let's practice again the week after next." And my answer was accepted... meaning that the difference in translation between "また" and "も" should be subtle enough to be accepted as synonymous in other exercises. However, that is unfortunately not the case.

When asked to translate this very sentence from english into japanese, we are expected to choose from 2 synonymous words that duolingo itself has taught us and just now confirmed as indeed synonymous, hoping that we've chosen whichever one they've randomly decided should be correct.

Im not saying they should accept every vague translation, but the inconsistency in the acceptance of translation shown in 2 separate exercises when using the very same sentence suggests laziness in my opinion, bc Im failing over simple semantics in one exercise and then in this exercise i'm breaking down the indolent flaws of duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KillerShah

I guessed right,"again"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WernerRetief723

The week after next does not sound right to my South African ears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beatricegastii

The English doesn't sound right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xJashindaChan

This is so frustrating, there are so many ways to translate this :o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

the road to procrastination


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyaniteD

Bit funny how everyone explains that 'the week after next' means 'the week after next week', but that version is not accepted. Are we learning Japanese or English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CanadasGreyBunny

You should be practicing every day


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mattias414720

It's more correct surely to say "Let's practice again the week after next week." Got an error for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DreamingSimon

"Let's practice the week after next week, too!" ... "You used the wrong word. Let's practice the week after next too." ...really???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiyamBhushan

The week after next let's practice again. Is also correct. Grrr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notyospud

Shouldn't "...next next week" be considered correct? Or is it too informal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vakar624235

Why does it say "let's practice again" It could be "let's practice the week after next" Why is "again" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

"Again" is here because of さ来週 (saraishuu mo). The particle も tells us that it is the week after next also that we should practice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/physicsme

talking about procrastination...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrmkart

One year later and DL still haven't fixed it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/99TjNs

Broken question again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily283723

The grammar doesnt make any sense...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura209845

Why does it insist on "the week after next"? Everyone i know generally drops the article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollyxyzzy

Same here. It sounds stuffy and awkward to include "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orion-the-Red

So you're saying "let's practice again week after next?" I'm going to disagree, since the week is specific, it needs the specific article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stordoff

The way it insists it be phased ("the week after next" at the end), it sounds more awkward to drop the article to me (vs. "Week after next, let's practice again")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgottsch

It accepted my sentence even tho i left out "again". Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohammeddi12

What about let's practice again after the next week


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

No. The sentence specifically refers to the week after next week; your sentence is more general and just refers to anytime after next week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belstar128

This does not make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Whitebirde

Sa raishuu mo renshyūushimashyū


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

Saraishū mo renshūshimashō.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esuna4

"The week after next?" Honestly I never heard that before. I always use "next week" or the week after this one, etc... Very strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

It's not referring to next week or the week after this one. It's referring to the week after that, the week coming after next week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatleenRousseau

I wish I could post a picture. it was right but it say I had a typo and I didn'T


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addakx

I literally put the right answer, but it was still counted wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seno329334

I think raishuu is the next week or the following week


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WTjHSgJ3

unnatural answer raishuu translates to next week in spoken english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

But the Japanese says さ来週. There is a さ in front of 来週 and さ来週 means the week after next week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara7777

Woah damn can you slow down the audio please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucieMarie8

Let's practice again the WEEK AFTER NEXT ??? After next ...what??? This is not correct grammar!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayceeDela

It's not common but it's also not incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsull

"Too" why you no accepto this worda?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Report it (assuming the rest of the sentence is correct)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayceeDela

Um if that's all you wrote... then it's wrong. So, no van a aceptar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christabel140352

The correct answer is not in proper english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArashiNL

It definitely is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitoriagabs

Iiiiiiiiinnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

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