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  5. "どなたですか?"

"どなたですか?"

Translation:Who is it?

June 10, 2017

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ganders3

Are you a donut?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LittleWhole

違う、りんごです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilda999992

I don't think I'll ever hear どなた normally again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/des135246

To be fair, it's a good way to remember the term. I'm never gonna forget どなた again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Houngawa

No, I'm an apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZokkoMan

Oh ho ho ho

Very funny, sir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickBaq

How does this differ from "Dare desu ka?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tc3KDQp5

I believe どなたですか is more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boo913

Is this related to あなた? Is there also a こなた, and そなた?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

=People=

どなた=何方

あなた=貴方 (彼方=かなた)

そなた=其方

こなた=此方

=Directions=

どちら=何方

あちら=彼方

そちら=其方

こちら=此方

(方 can be a respectful way of saying either person or direction.)

So you can see that these words are different readings of the same kanji, except for the commonly used あなた. The 貴 kanji in あなた is an honorific title (i.e. lord) rather than a (this/that/over there) location identifier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

I KNEW IT! I made the same observation as boo913. Mind breaking down the uses for these fine words? ...And why "anata" is considered impolite? Is it, perhaps, because it's overly-polite and creates an awkward situation because it's not being used properly? MY MIND HUNGERS.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

It's not rude, it's just overly-friendly to not use someone's name if you know their name already. It's like "I know you enough to skip your name".

A wife would call their husband あなた and this sounds very similar to how you would say "darling" in English. You can also see that the kanji used for the word denotes this meaning、貴方 literally means "person that I hold in high esteem" or a "precious person to me". They are way better pronouns than あなた、the thing is that when they are teaching people Japanese あなた is the most convenient one because is very neutral in general, that's the impression I get at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Ahh, I see! Thanks! That's a really helpful insight and ties together a bunch of different, seemingly contrasting, answers I've gotten in the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

I noticed that use of あなた in quite a few Japanese TV shows recently, and indeed that was often how they translated it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaviFontal

何方ですか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

どなた is usually written in kana.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desmond7900

Thank you for stating this, it is really helpful! Helps us know which Kanji is unnecessary to learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdulrahma826404

You can check if some words are usually written with kana on jisho.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloyd76445

Would it also be correct to translate this as "Who are you?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I wrote that and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Ice-Cream.

I believe it can but that would depend on the context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lmao_Me

That is correct. どなた is more polite, and works to soften the tone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Is this the sort of thing you would say after "moshi moshi" on the phone, or when you hear a knock on the door?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hanabi001

So is using 誰 rude in certain situations? When should we use どなた?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

Yep. I think it's because it's abrupt. Japanese culture is pretty indirect, and Japanese people are always considering the other person. (That is, looking out for how they should proceed by reading cues from the people around them.) So, being indirect allows them to kind of "test the water" in order to gain this information, and then act accordingly. Hence, there's not a lot of directness or speaking one's mind without regard for the social environment. Socially speaking, they're pretty cautious. It has its good and bad points, of course, just like speaking one's mind without regard for others does.

Adjacently related:

I personally think that there needs to be a balance. You shouldn't bottle everything up and stifle yourself, but you should be considerate of other people, too. Everyone's emotional and mental health is important. Not only yours (using the general "you" here, by the way, not talking about you specifically, Hanabi001) and not excluding yours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJWb3X

Im getting flash backs of my high school Japanese 15 years ago. When a classmate shows up late, our sensei this phrases in japanese. At the same time, this classmate would yell out in English "Want a donut?!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cryopneuma

XD What a fun story!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

Wow, 3 years on and it still doesn't accept "who is he?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tenshi949116

Although the phrase means, "Who are you?" couldn't this be phrased in English as, "And you are?" based on politeness?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ionithca

the only thing i can think for riggt now is the beginning of a knock knock joke.

knock-knock どなたですか?

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