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  5. "午後五時にゆうはんを食べます。"

"午後五時にゆうはんを食べます。"

Translation:I eat dinner at 5 P.M.

June 10, 2017

76 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherubl

午後五時 is fun to say


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kittycat2223

I had to do a double take myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robinsoba

Its "GO" Time!


[deactivated user]

    In online video games I've seen Japanese speaking players use 555 to mean go go go.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

    They also use 39 to say "thx" because it reads "san kyuu"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebAzevedo

    This is the kind of information I look for in the comments.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

    For other slang like this, check out the "Japanese wordplay" article on Wikipedia.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

    This is adorable!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillowsofXihu

    Chinese use 3q for the same meaning (as their 9 is pronounced differently so doesn't work for "thank you")


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex323842

    And that's just for 5 PM. Imagine 5:55 PM ---> Gogo goji gojugofun


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

    It's funny that there are three different characters for the same syllable 'go'! Silly Japanese! :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nopinopa

    One day you'll learn about Chinese, my sweet summer child...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomPiddock

    Oh Japan, with their silly syllables. They're so much easier in English, there'd no issue understanding their syllable sounds if they were more like they are in English. If only there were some way writing their intent with different Kanji would mean they're able to convey more context when their syllables sound similar.

    If only.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meilonn

    Dear sir, you make my day.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leilah.R.E

    I've never heard someone say ゆうはん. I usually hear ばんごはん?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

    ゆうしょく is also an option, which I think is used more than ゆうはん.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_jclipse

    The literal translation is evening meal.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DwiArya

    Although some people think that because in the morning, 朝 (asa), we eat 朝ご飯, and in the afternoon, 昼 (hiru), we eat 昼ご飯, then at night, 夜 (yoru), we ought to be eating 夜ご飯. However, the word 夜ご飯 didn't initially exist in Japanese. Someone just made that word up recently, so that the term 夕飯 (yuuhan) is generally applied.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nopinopa

    But what about 晩ご飯? It surely exist.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Col438151

    I totally agree.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hlyusha

    At 5pm I eat dinner is also correct!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

    That is actually a more literal translation :3


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueLinguist

    The literal translations should count


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael506383

    I thought I was clever typing "I eat dinner at 17:00" (since Japan uses the 24h clock), but NOPE! :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    They use both, so you can say 午後5時 or 17時. I'd go with whichever the Japanese specifies.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saman292743

    5:00 p.m surely acceptable as well as 5 p.m ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamDixo

    I put "i eat dinner at 5 in the evening" and it was wrong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

    Some might see 5pm as "afternoon" instead of "evening". Either way, no such reference is made in the Japanese sentence, so it may be best to just stick with "5pm".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex425703

    Could someone write it in hiragana?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alcedo-Atthis

    午後 ごご (p.m.)

    五時 ごじ (5 o'clock)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mzerrath

    For some reason, 5:00 pm is not the same as 5 pm on Duolingo. Why is that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryanLen

    Here, in Brazil, we would never eat dinner at 5pm. we use to dinner at around 20h to 21h in the evening.

    At 5pm we use to have a cofee-break, mostly with family, and eat breakfast stuff, such as cookies, coffee, milk, breads, butter and jelly.

    Also, we consider 5 pm as noon, not night. =]


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzatHaidov

    And the next day you wake up at noon.? I love Brazil already


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Most Japanese people don't eat dinner at 5 p.m., either. Brazil sounds lovely, and that's interesting about 5 p.m. being afternoon.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

    5 is afternoon for most English speakers, too, in my experience. Personally, I consider evening to be 6 and on.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidKames

    I couldnt resist turning the volume on to listen to her say go go go xD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mastslyer

    gogogoji ni yuuhan o tabemasu


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine816452

    There are all sorts of variations in what English speakers call various meals - in Australia, a hot meal eaten at lunchtime would be called dinner and our evening meal is often called tea, and it would definitely be tea it eaten at 5pm (little old ladies eat at this time and they would not call the evening meal dinner - that's a more modern usage).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

    午後五時に夕飯を食べます。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frodoniku

    What are you 90?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fujinana

    I like the way she says "han"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scott827167

    Lol pm or p.m..... pm without "." Isn't a typo


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam56856

    It doesn't accept "I eat tea at 5 p.m". Are we only allowed to use the "dinner" variation for eating tea/dinner?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finndj

    Is there a difference between 「晩御飯」and 「夕飯」?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maehovland

    is ゆうはん just more formal than ばんごはん?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaMora275179

    could this mean ' at 5pm i will eat dinner' or is it wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Yes, that should work.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimothyStu8

    It doesn't accept I eat dinner at five in the afternoon, which is exactly the same as five P.M.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tonkotsu09

    I answered as 5:00 p.m. and it says it's incorrect! That should be right!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Contranegative

    It should accept just "at five", without the PM. This is how normal English speakers talk. No one would assume that you mean AM.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

    Yes but in Japanese the PM part can also be easily omitted. If it was kept, we need to have it reflected in the translation as Duolingo is all about translating exactly what was given in the example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickMarsto1

    It was annoying enough being refused "I eat dinner at five o'clock in the afternoon.". However, being knocked back a second time for omitting the punctuation in "p.m." was infuriating indeed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arikancelikok

    i said i am having dinner at 5 pm and it didn't accept :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    This is one of those colloquial things we do in English where we shorten the future tense "I am going to have" into "I am having". You can make an argument for it because it's what people naturally say. But it's easily confused with the present progressive tense (I am currently having dinner), so I think it's better to avoid it. The other problem might be using "have" instead of "eat", though once again it's very natural in English to say "have dinner".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickMarsto1

    Oh, come on, if you're going to treat us to 「午後五時」don't spoil it by reducing the "correct" answer to this. Really, that is ugly English however concise it may be. Any combination of "I /we eat dinner / dine at 5 p.m. /five (o' clock) in the afternoon." should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

    Tea is also used for dinner in other countries than US


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miloceane

    Is 5pm a normal time to have dinner in Japan? I've lived in France where it's usually around 8pm and in the Netherlands where it's more between 6pm and 7pm, so 5pm sounds pretty early!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Maybe if you have small kids, but most Japanese fathers are not coming home before 6:00 (or 7 or 8).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ejhe7

    Five o'clock wasn't accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninomyakun

    What happened to 晩ご飯 (ばんごはん)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sredeker

    How do we know the difference between the present and progressive tenses? I wrote "I'm eating dinner at 5pm." and it was wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

    食べます is present/future simple

    食べています is progressive

    The main difference in usage is that progressive describes the action happening now while present simple is about regular activities. "I'm eating dinner at 17:00" means it's now 17:00 and I'm eating dinner at this moment while "I eat dinner at 17:00" means that my usual dinner time is 17:00.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARMY_In_Distress

    Wasn't dinner 「ばんごはん」?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/art-nattanon

    How come type what you hear section doesn't accept all-hiragana and force me to use kanji when it usually doesn't accept kanji. I'm confused.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fryxell1

    Who has dinner at 5


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick944681

    definitely annoying when I type ごごごじにゆうはんをたべます and it marks me wrong because I didnt type 午後五時にゆうはんを食べます


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandon_Y

    I've never heard of "yuuhan" for dinner. It makes sense, but I hear "bangohan" or "yuushoku" more often.

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