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  5. "お金をとらないでください。"

"お金をとらないでください。"

Translation:Please don't take money.

June 10, 2017

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

強盗(ごうとう Robber): お店を今開けてください。

店長(てんちょう Owner):お金を取らないでください。(;´д`)


[deactivated user]

    What a polite robber!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nivkotzer

    This is why I love the Japanese people, even the crooks are polite :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaraUniverse

    that's right isn't it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Famsnow

    This is awesome, it really helps to see the sentences in context! Someone should do this for all the phrases >_•


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarloesOos

    I love this! Does anyone know why he put in the kanji for now (今)? Maybe like, please open the shop now, but I think then it should be at a different spot. So what does it mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

    That first sentence is from another exercise. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23248910


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

    お金を取らないでください。


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J_Hammy

    スワイパー、取らない!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boo913

    What's happening here? Is it because it's negative imperative form?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rarrgrr

    Would you accept kibble?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JovemImortal

    Anyone could give me the verb of this phrase in the present moment?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9
    • 取(と)る take
    • 取(と)ります take (polite form)
    • 取(と)らない do not take
    • 取(と)っている is taking

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amrjunior1

    does RU always change to RA for RU-verbs?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dear_Deka

    No, but this is not a ru-verb. Verbs that end in る are only ru-verbs when the sound before the る is a "i" or "e" (ex. せ、め、み、ね、り、い、え, and so on). In this case, it's an "o," whivh makes this a u-verb that happens to end with る. To make a ru-verb negitave, you remove the る and add ない (ex. 食べる = 食べない、見る(みる) = 見ない).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avidrucker

    I feel like this should have 私の at the beginning... Is it implied to be mine, or is simply just contextual?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli79267

    Japanese often omit the subject due to the context;

    And in this case, I think it is possible that the money is found on the street, so basically nobody knows who owns it.

    Japanese people would normally take the money to the nearby police station rather than take it for themselves.

    In English it'd be like: Please just don't take the money.

    rather than: take my money or his money.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conpanbear

    I was imagining a label with this phrase stuck to a tip jar. So no, it's not necessarily referring to money that belongs to you, it's just asking not to take some quantity of money.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LimeGreenTeknii

    It also accepts "please don't take money". It would be implied in certain contexts if it's supposed to be "my".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

    Please don't accept bribes.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tuerkenheimer

    I wanted to say "Please don't take the money"

    There was no "the" to chose from but a "this". I actually knew that that would be false but damn Duolingo, you baited me :( Please add a "the" to the word bank


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Tsukimaru1

    Why is it not とらなくてください? Is there a difference between the two versions?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

    You only use -naide with requests, be it with or without kudasai.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

    There is no specific reason. I suggest just remember in each case whether to use ないで or なくて

    • ないでください
    • ないでいる
    • なくてはならない
    • なくて済む
    • なくていい

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

    Today I have found a very good explanation of ないで and なくて (for verbs - for nouns/adjectives it is always なくて).

    http://nihon5ch.net/contents/bbs-study/old/mie-bbs.cgi?s=30

    In short, if there is a natural connection between two clauses, use なくて, and if there is a strong relationship between the two clauses, then ないで (except for the reason usage).

    When I have time (or someone else who agrees what the people said in the link above), I (or s/he) will add some more explanations...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heyber_molano

    I think it's important to put kanjis in some phrases. It's too hard to learn Japanese without them.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conniepuce

    Why won't it accept "please don't take any money?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

    But there is nothing in the Japanese sentence that denotes "any." To include it, the Japanese sentence becomes

    お金を少しも取らないでください


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

    I kind of disagree on that one. It's more natural in English to say any. I too put that "Please don't take any money" and it was marked wrong. you could also say "please don't take the money" and it could also be correct in this case, but without context it's hard to know.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

    When would the English translation be used in English? I can think of situations where "Please don't take my / someone's / the money" would work, but I'm having trouble coming up with a sentence where it'd make sense to use so little context in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS.6

    I still have doubts about the meaning of the phrase. Does it mean "don't take money [to the place where you're going]" or "don't take [my] money"? Can it be both?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

    Please do not take away money.

    Whose money it is is unknown. Where the money has gone is also unsaid.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_woody_

    Please do not earn money

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