1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "へやに人が一人います。"

"へやに人が一人います。"

Translation:There is one person in the room.

June 10, 2017

67 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moai9

'一人' has to be read as 'hitori', doesn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stevrn4

Yeh, the audio is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkaland

I think it's fixed as of 2 July 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

They've added an additional new speaking voice, and it's saying 'kazuto' as of Feb 2019, but the old one's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaVJn7k9

Correct. The female voice is fine. The male TTS is wrong for this question. (Complicating the matter is that which voice is incorrect is different depending on the question....)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuzuling

This confused me for a min


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwilio

I don't understand why 人 appears twice in the sentence, why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I believe the first is the word "person" and the second is the counter word for people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

In the room, a person is one person.

Outside the room, all bets are off. 私は三人です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMcAlpi

Are you Jiraiya, Tsunade, or Orochimaru?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miro839815

I think the answer is 'Yes'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgottsch

Can anyone answer if the non-counter hito is required? Which is mkre awkward sounding -- with or without?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chobbit

I am also a learner, but I think leaving the non-counter persoun out would read as "There is a in the room.", with a hint that it refers to a personlike object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

ひとり only refers to people, as far as I know, so I think it'd be fine to leave out ひとが in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

"I'm alone in the room" = へやにひとりいます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristinaBa504801

I thought that would make it mean "I'm alone in the room" without ひとが based on a previous lesson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FalconFlurry

this confused me too, but I think I understand it now, someone correct me if I'm wrong... ひとりis just a counter, ひとが determines what is being counted. The fact that they both have ひと in them is kind of misleading. The counter only has ひと in it because it happens to be derived from the same word as the subject being counted. But if you were to replace the person in the sentence with something else, like an apple, the distinction would be more apparent. Eg: へやに りんごが ひとつ あります。It becomes much more clear why the subject is required. Without りんごが the reader would not know what there is only one of.

In the specific circumstance of this question, ひとが is somewhat redundant because ひとり is a counter that is used exclusively for people, however for consistency sake it is left in. There is actually a word for this in English which is a "pleonasm", that is basically an unnecessary word that is left in the sentence for grammatical reasons. For example: In the sentence "It is raining" the pronoun "it" adds no meaning to the sentence because it's already understood what is raining because only the sky rains. However, to remove "it" from the sentence (Is raining) would sound awkward and would be incorrect because there must be a subject in every English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michael.fe4

You're on the money here, but I don't think the 人が is redundant at all. Sure, 一人 can only count people, but what person is in the room alone? Without specifying, and without context, the subject is assumed to be "me", and the sentence becomes "I am in the room by myself".

Without the 一人 it's also not clear how many people are in the room. I feel like that would make it more like (though I'm taking a slight liberty here) "someone is in the room" rather than "a person is in the room" or "a person is in the room alone".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel746428

If if you translate literally, you could understand as "There is a person alone in the room". Hitori literally means one person, but in such contexts can mean alone, and futari can mean "two people together". I warn you it is fully contextual, such counter literally means one person, two, three...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g0g21

The audio is also really hard to make out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fork8

へやに ひとが ひとり います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

部屋に人が一人います。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiro_kasai

I put "There is a person alone in the room." Am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HachiLark

That's what I thought. I'm confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentM929983

This is what i read as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HakimAceval

Word order could be more flexible in accepted English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Definitely report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sintanity

I feel like the literal translation of this sentence is "The number of people in the room is 1" whereas "heya ni hitori ga imasu" would be "There is one person in the room" Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JadeDragon

How would "The person in the room is alone" go then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I think it'd be something like へやにいるひとはひとりでいます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbinero

Do you need to add the 一人 or will 部屋に人がいます also work? Will the last one make it sound like there might be multiple people?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/realadry

There is no plural is japanese, so every noun can mean a single or multiple. So 一人 is needed to indicate it's one person or the person is alone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

It specifies there are unknown number of people if 一人 is omitted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kittycat2223

Can someone break this down please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sintanity

へやに (In the room) 人が (the amount of people) 一人 (one person) います (exists) Or I guess, a literal translation would be more "In the room, the number of people is 1 person" In this case, the 一人 is used to mean "number of people: 1" I hope that clears it up a bit!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/realadry

"There is a single person in the room" should be correct too but is detected as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

The audio is still not correct. 7/2/18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cl_fi_it

I hear something like "kazuto" or "kazeto" for 一人. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

It's the usual reading of 一人 when written left-to-right as it is here and it's a person's name. Hitori is actually written 1人. I wanted to write, "The person in the room is Kazuto." へやに人が1人います。I'd translate 「部屋に人が1人居ます。」 near as I can directly as, "The people in the room [perhaps looking only at this time] number one [in all]."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

For, "The person in the room is Kazuto", it would be something like, へやの人は一人さんです。yeah?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

Unless he was part of a group including you that the person you are speaking to is outside of, but generally that'd be preferable, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarissaFae

Alternate readings shouldn't be used when you're a beginner. >.< It just creates confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LarissaFae

The initial voice is still saying "kazuto" rather than "hitori."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nivkotzer

Could it be "heya ni hitori imasu"? If not why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

部屋に一人がいます


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelNing

I don't think that's correct. It's like saying "there is one in the room" in English (instead of "there is one person in the room").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DhoniSFA

So 一人 = counter right? So if there are two people in the room it will be へや に 人 が 二人 います? Cmiiw


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

一人 can be a noun or an adverb (= counter usage)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabian39601

I can't quite make out the audio, can someone clarify how this is correctly pronounced? Particularly for the first jin. I unfortunately can't type kana, but would 'Heya ni jin ga hitori imas' be correct? It certainly sounds different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

The first 人 pronouns as "hito" and it is the case whenever 人 is used alone as a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurie68898

人 x 2 seems redundant, but the sentence can't work without it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

Could you use de instead of ni here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

You cannot. For existance verbs います あります, the particle to represent the location must be に.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R-K-M

I am a Japanese.【The person is in a room 】✕?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

The person is in a room = その人がある部屋にいます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I'm not sure what you're asking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wenieth

Can't it be interpreted as ''There's a persin alone in the room?'' Since 一人 can work as both ''alone'' or as a counter, yea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

That would be へやに 人が ひとり います。 and the kanji is 独り not 一人.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulJones279857

There definetly needs to to be a slow mo button for the japanese. Especially because there are no furigana for the kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante.I.

His name is tommy wiseau


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanne751842

I frankly can't understand what the female voice is saying. Heya ni hishtori nimasu is what I hear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben813848

"へやに人が一人います。"

"Heya ni hito ga hitori imasu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Hito and hitori are pronounced as hto and htori. The i in hi is not pronounced due to vowel reduction.

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.