"Can I get that one?"

Translation:あれをください。

June 10, 2017

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/souza_J

It's japanese. Try not to compare it. Get used to it instead.

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carlos.val755414

Very wise words

August 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristan141617

What do u mean by that? I am french, speak a little english and just started japanese.

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luccastro

He's saying that you should stop comparing languages, like trying to translate everything into a word and you'll learn better

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeNedraTay

It's best to learn a language through "chunking" rather than breaking down the grammar imo :)

December 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarrisonNapper

I think Jeff is saying not to think of Japanese in French grammar, but on its own terms. Japonais a son propre grammaire très différente.

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarknessOf2

Different languages cannot be compared to other languages, unless the language that is being compared to another language has historical roots to each other in terms of grammar, words, or/and pronunciation. Get it?

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Il-Mentore

That's a little too extreme. You might just say that one cannot compare each language in the same way. Spanish has similarities to Italian because of shared Latin roots, but that doesn't mean that each of those languages have no similarities at all to, say, Japanese or Korean. Spanish and Japanese will have some comparable qualities since all humans are comparable in one way or another. And the same will go for every language on Earth. They can be compared, just not in the same way each time.

Some more concrete advice might be to keep working hard even though the differences are discouraging. Or in American terms, "Quit yer belly achin' and get to work!" :p

February 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Natalie_Toshino

Kinda like English/German. They can be compared, somewhat phonetically, but the grammar is still off. Most lingual grammars differ from English, as English is grammatically... different.

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MightyXT

Why?

April 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martim447566

❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adhyan6

Riszgyabshudb

March 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zjordan1

What's the difference between あれ and それ?

June 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan.Kapa

Kore: This (near speaker). Sore: That (near listener). Are: That (far).

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ActualAutist

Appreciate it

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slakoth

Thank you!!!

January 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JorgeGaete6

The reason I entered here. Thanks :) due to in spanish (argentina) we have kore=esto=(this) zore=eso=(that) *are=aquello=(that again)

April 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akane-senpai

Thank! I was wondering about that

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjfwalker

Demonstratives

deixis: EN / JP proximal: this / こ (ko) medial: --- / そ (so) distal: that / あ (a)

Many languages feature the linguist category 'demonstratives' that some of their words fall into. Both English and Japanese are among such languages. Demonstratives communicate spatial deixis. With English, it's binary being proximal or distal, first person or not, 'this here' or 'that there', near me the speaker or not respectively. With Japanese, it's ternary, featuring the medial demonstrative as the third type. The medial demonstrative is like a additional 'that' which is second person meaning near you the addressee.

October 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjfwalker

Demonstratives

deixis: EN / JP proximal: this / こ (ko) medial: --- / そ (so) distal: that / あ (a)

Many languages feature the linguist category 'demonstratives' that some of their words fall into. Both English and Japanese are among such languages. Demonstratives communicate spatial deixis. With English, it's binary being proximal or distal, first person or not, 'this here' or 'that there', near me the speaker or not respectively. With Japanese, it's ternary, featuring the medial demonstrative as the third type. The medial demonstrative is like a additional 'that' which is second person meaning near you the addressee.

October 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eldes23

これ is "this" meaning YOU are the one holding the object

それ is "that" meaning the LISTENER is holding the object

あれ is "that over there" meaning BOTH of you are far away on the object

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mateu-san

What purpose does 'wo' have here?

June 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.B.347161

Its a particle. When its used as a particle, it's actually pronounced as "o".

What preceeds the を particle is the object of the sentence.

E.g. I eat FOOD. I buy CAKE. (the capitalized words are the objects of their respective sentences.)

June 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FonzieSquirrel

Little sidenote: it's still pronounced as "wo", but much more subtly.

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polowish

Wo (pronnounced o) is the noun particle. If you make an action that mabipulates the noun you use it. Like: I eat water would be: water o eat (verbs always come at the end of a sentance).

However, this is not the same as ga. Ga is used when "it just is". For example, if you like someone, you would say: ____ ga suki (desu). This is because you cant help who you like. Its for involuntary things like say if an earthquake broke a lamp.

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentAgu4

isn't "sore" used for objects far from the speaker but near the listener? "are" is far from both, right? english "That" is ambiguous

June 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan.Kapa

Correct!

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erozada

Hi, why there is no "ka" at the end of the question?

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Kudasai is the question. Pleaase?

July 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

It's technically a request, not a question. But since it's a polite request, and polite requests in English are often framed as questions (when not using "please"), translating it into a question is acceptable.

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flypirat

would it be a mistake to put a 'ka' (か) in the end?

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Yes, I believe you cannot add か after ください but I'm afraid I don't have a good explanation why. ください is simply a specific verb conjugation that doesn't work with it, just as て-form, conditional, and imperative forms won't work either.

July 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JinseiwaUsodesu

Why is "that one" before "can I get?"

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ember667589

Think of it as pointing at something and saying "That one, please?"

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FonzieSquirrel

In Japanese the verb is always the last word of the sentence, and "kudasai" is a verb.

Real easy grammar actually ^_^

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BriHell

Can someone help break down/translate the sentence for better understanding please?

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flypirat

I can try. Read from top to bottom. それ 'sore' means far from speaker but close to listener (I just assumed that is the case) を indicates that the object that 'sore' refers to is the object of the sentence ください。means 'please give' in a way So that would make 'please give me that [thing]'. As far as I understand there is no ka (か) in the end because technically this is no question, but a request. Please correct me if I am wrong, I just got it this way because of other comments explaining it.

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan374812

Yeah some of these later lessons need more explanation.

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poornachan5

Please add the correct voice , probably speak the sentence once we complete.. so that we can learn, listen and ensure our correctness.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dvsr047

How will you be able to tell whether they are talking about something close これor something far あれ on here?

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FonzieSquirrel

"This thing (in my hand) is a pencil" = "kore wa enpitsu ga desu”

"That thing (next to you) is a pencil" = "sore wa enpitsu ga desu"

"That thing (on the shelf over there) is a pencil" = "are wa enpitsu ga desu"

"Which of these is a pencil?" = "dore wa enpitsu ga desu ka"

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PStrotman

Right, Japanese had a distinction and English doesn't (without awkwardly amending 'that' with 'over there' or similar anytime you intend the reader to know you mean あれ.

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EAIK3

what does "ga desu" mean?

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Fonzie made mistakes in his examples. "Ga desu" in those sentences is nonsensical and "ga" shouldn't be there, unless a "pencil moth" is a thing... (が = 蛾 = "moth")

As a side note, particles seldom come directly before です; it's not incorrect, but it is significantly more common that です follows a noun or an adjective.

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitoriavlsmtr

Whats the difference between これ and あれ?

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan.Kapa

Kore: This (near speaker). Sore: That (near listener). Are: That (far).

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_kayla_h

I put "Are kudasai" and it was correct. Is this an informal way this?

June 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan.Kapa

Kore: This (near speaker). Sore: That (near listener). Are: That (far).

June 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Yes, I believe dropping particles makes things more informal.

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unklethan

So I think I'm getting this. Can someone double check me please?

を is a particle, which follows a noun, indicating that it is the object. In an admittedly broken example: I throw the ball (を). And わ/は is a particle which follows the subject. To repeat the broken example: I (わ) throw the ball (を) .... Am i understanding this right?

June 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

That's exactly right. Although, when we're talking about the particle は, you can just use は and not わ :)

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/superkitty789

We didn't learn this yet. I'm confused.

June 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adeline.c

Why is it suddenly that one? Not that over there?

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

In English, "that one" can also be referring to "that one over there." I believe あれ is only defined as "that one over there" to emphasize to new learners that it is different from それ.

As long as the thing you are referring to is not close to the speaker, and not close to the listener, you can use あれ in Japanese, and just "that" in English (unless you wanted to be extra specific).

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gkirk

Duo wants me to use "are" for this sentence, but that seems like a strange request if it's meant to convey something farther away.

August 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

Well, あれ is only for something which is far from the speaker and the listener, but "far" is only generally considered "out of arms' reach".

So you could be standing on a viewing deck with a luxury yacht salesman, looking out over the harbour, and you point to the biggest one and say to him 「あれをください」.

August 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hernn305545

こんにちは! If anyone is going to japan, specially next march-april, please feel free to join our whatsapp group! https://chat.whatsapp.com/HBfZVt0Pn114YAHljV7vVT

August 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mbunk1

Ok so it seems like this stuff is starting to confuse a lot of people. Because there are a lot of rules to the language and duo is mostly giving phrases, with no explanation. So you don't get to know what individual words mean or why you use one over the other in a situation.

Highly recommend using Memrise if you are totally new to Japanese. Gives translations of individual words, not just jumping into whole phrases. And it tells you if its formal or not, and what words are used to add formality but don't necessarily have an english translation.

I am really not loving how duo gives you a kanji and its spelling and no defintion and then just gives you a sentence you have never seen and expects you to translate. Especially since when I click on it, it defines most of it at once so I don't learn the individual break down of the words in the sentence. Memrise does like flashcards for each word or phrase and breaks it down nicely. And it tracks which words your struggling with and gives extra practice on them.

Also so far at least we haven't gotten into kanji. And obviously I don't intend to never learn it, but it seems inefficient to try and learn a new word by writing it in a way that you can't possibly figure out the pronunciation or what it means until you have memorized the corrct placement of a dozen seemingly arbitrary lines. Seems smarter to learn it in hiragana first, then once you're used to the way it sounds and what it means, then start to worry about memorizing the kanji, instead of doing it all at once which makes it feel like you aren't making much progress.

But memrise isn't free. So that's your call, but I feel like this has a lot of difficulty spikes. Seems like I have been getting more out of that app lately.

Thought I would share for those of you who are struggling. Because reading the comments it seems like a lot of you are confused. Memrise, like it alot, but i think it's like 60 bucks for a year. I got it half off for labor day.

WaniKani is supposed to be good as well, and they have a system for teaching kanji, using radicals (which are the individual components of the kanji) to help with memorization instead of just trying to memorize strokes. Haven't used it yet. Wanted to strengthen my vocab first.

My god that was long, apologies. Hope it helps though. Just don't give up because it's getting complicated. There are many many resources.

September 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaLarkin2

I know how to translate English into Japanese but how do I type Japanese characters? On the app you don't have to.

October 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RmiGATARD

Drawings would be better instead of "that" and "this". :)

November 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kayla439930

Oh dear i feel like yoda

December 12, 2017

[deactivated user]

    How do you know the difference between あれ, これ, and それ?

    March 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

    You read any of the many comments on this discussion page that explain the difference, preferably before posting next time. After that, it's a matter of memorization.

    March 13, 2018
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