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  5. "There is no bathtub."

"There is no bathtub."

Translation:お風呂はありません。

June 10, 2017

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaymelGarc1

so why isnt it ふろではありません?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

For people really want to understand what で is underneath, it is one of the particle usage - "in/as a state of." So これはトイレです expands to これはトイレであります meaning "This exists as a concept/state of a toilet." In a more reader-friendly version, "This is a toilet."

Similarly, トイレではありません means "(This) does not exists as a concept of a toilet." The は in ではありません is a contrast marker particle stressing the negative fact.

トイレがあります means "A toilet exists." Note that the subject is different from トイレであります (implicitly これ is the subject - これは is omitted from the sentence). Using the same logic, トイレはありません is "A toilet does not exist." In other words, "There is no toilet."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fran630920

I don't think I'm being able to get the whole で (de) deal. Sometimes in negation sentences lingo would include the simbol to pick and sometimes won't. Both times the sentence comes out fine with or without it. I'm thinking to myself で is just an adornment for negation sentences. This language has oh so many adornments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

It would help me to help you if you can send me some concrete examples that you have come across. However I would like to stress again that, the で in ではありません is not an optional modifier to はありません. These two phrases have different meanings and should not be mixed up.

Let me give some more examples and hopefully it will help.

  • ごはんは ありません There is no rice.
  • ごはんでは ありません It is not rice.

  • 学校(がっこう)は ありません There is no school.

  • 学校では ありません It is not a school.
  • 学校には ありません It is not in school.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alyeku

Dear KeithWong9. Thank you so much fir all your many comments. The overwhelming majority appreciates them, as do I!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordonGee

As i understand it, ではありません essentially is, it is not, it is something different, as はありません、is, it does not exist, there is none.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daikuma_Deluxe

This is awesome, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamDunmar

Such a great clarification. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crissy1208

Ah~ I see, this was a lot clearer thank you (or maybe I was just too dumb to understand your previous explanation)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

Ohhh, so if someone asks if you have a computer, and you don't have a computer, you answer with パソコンは ありません. But if you own an ancient tv set from 1960, and your friend had never seen one before and asks you if it's a computer, you answer with パソコンではありません. Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

Yes, you got it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMGX4H

Thanks for the help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kayla534412

This helps a lot! Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dEKU-17

お風呂ではありません = It is not a bathtub お風呂はありません = There is no bathtub

The で comes from です "to be"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricPooley

Actually, technically, it is the other way around. です is a contraction of ではあります, which ではありません is the negative of. Other than that, you are correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lazariusta

I asked the same thing before checking the comments, and it seems other people have too. Does anybody know the answer? And how would the inclusion of 'で' change the sentence meaning? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mochiburrito

I believe it's because the sentence is, "There is no bathtub," instead of, "It is not a bathtub." ありません is the negative, polite verb for the existence of inanimate objects (ある), where ではありません is the negative, polite ending of です. Take this with a grain of salt, as I'm not entirely sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SherylHohman

Ahh, this explanation finally cleared it up for me! Thanks for explaining in a way that finally clicked!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark71692

I thought が is always use when using ある/いる


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriKalinin

It depends on what you want to say. は (topic) "the bathroom doesn't exist". が (subject) "this is not a/the bathroom".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibelcic

So is トイレがありません the same as トイレではありません ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicofiesta

I think the first one means "There is no restroom" and second one means "This is not a restroom"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlecTheKulak

Well then what would トイレはありません mean if トイレがありません meant "There is no restroom"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricPooley

From what I understand the distinction between 「はありません」 and「がありません」 is very subtle and doesn't really translate into English. In Japan the general usage is 「があります」 and「はありません」. Also 「はありますか」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/L4nds

They both mean "There is no restroom" however in one sentence you are making restrooms the topic of conversation by using は.

The other sentence marked with が would be used when restrooms are a subject of the wider topic of conversation, eg. レストラン は トイレ が ありません - the restaurant has no restroom.

は and が are two key characters known as particles. Particles are fundamental to the Japanese language so I recommend finding some good learning material specifically on particles, it will really help with the rest of this Duolingo course, there are plenty of dedicated articles and videos around.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rbenfield3

Earlier, when it said there is a bathroom, it used 'が'. Now, in the negative, it uses 'は'. Is there a rule about that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristosZhu

I would like this to be answered as well. Here 'bathroom' is the subject, so が would have definitely been used for あります


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatherinHodgso

Why do you need the o at the begining of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schmoo1976

The O makes certain nouns more polite, such as alcohol (o-sake instead of simply sake)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LexiJPGabi

i would like to have a better understanding of this. It seems 昼ご飯 (ひるごはん) also tends to be o-hiru-gohan, but why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

If you are actually interested I recommend reading this article: https://www.japanesewithanime.com/2018/03/honorific-prefix-o-go.html

But in general you use these prefixes because the word is often times used with it and separating them will make it sound weird, or because you wanna be polite to the listener. In the particular case of ご飯 is just a phenomenon where the word is always said like that but if you see 飯 you will pronounce it with the kunyomi as in めし, for お昼ご飯 is adding the prefix to be polite, and 昼ご飯 sounds completely fine without the prefix.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karn23

Another sentence was identical except it said ふろではありません instead of ふろありません . Sometim This contradicts a comment about では being needed to express negatives. Is saying では instead of で for negatives optional?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kai19154

The first sentence means "it's not a bathtub" and the second means "there isn't a bathtub".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

ません is the negative part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabe629

Can someone explain to me what ありmeans?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatZombies

ありis the stem of あります/ある which means "to have".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

Technically, it means to exist; but in certain situations (especially with が) it can mean have.


[deactivated user]

    What is the difference between ではありません and ありません ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DKC995785

    I have this question too. In other sections of this course, "arimasu" requires "dewa" in front of it when becoming negative ("dewa arimasun"), so why not here? I'm having trouble understanding the rule, if someone could explain it I would be very grateful!


    [deactivated user]

      ok so i found out that ではありません is the negative of です while  ありません is the opposite of あります.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricPooley

      It helps if you know that 「です」 is a contraction of「ではあります」


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danny736259

      I'm a little confused as to the pronunciation of bathtub. It reads ふろ(furo) , however I hear ふじょ(fujo). Why is that?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanShaeffer

      Somehow the ふろwhich should be pronounced "fu ro" is being pronounced like "風呂" but not vice versa. So i thought that the tube itself is "風呂" but the bathroom or taking a bath is ふろ.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peppisan

      Hello I looked it up because I thought I was hearing ふろ as "fusho" and apparently depending where in japan you are it is pronounced differently. For example some pronounce ふろ as either "furo" or "fusho" and even "huro". Wild!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/averageteencuber

      yea and the female voice pronounces it fujo, it's sorta a tad confusing


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konim96

      The one thing that confuses me here is the use of は instead of が. I know that in most cases が should go before ある or いる. At least that is how I was thought in my university.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

      that's a terrible way to teach it, the difference between using が and は is how explicit the topic is and how much emphasis you want to put on the thing you are marking.

      if you use は is to let the listener know that you are talking about that, usually is used when a conversation is starting, when you wanna change topic mid conversation or when you are just saying general statements.

      For this example, I imagine the speaker is just stating a fact, maybe you are selling a house and you are telling the potential buyer お風呂はありません (as for a bathtub there is none). But let's say someone is asking you what's missing in the house (the topic is set, the house), so you mentally go on a list of the things that are there and you compare that with the ones that are not... and you say お風呂がありません (it's a bathtub that doesn't exist here), the が makes an emphasis on the thing in contrast with other things.

      You can usually see が too when stating fact about a topic. If I wanna say for example you don't have a bathtub I say "コニンさんはお風呂がいません", because I need to be explicit that I'm talking about you, but if I wanna say I don't have one I just say お風呂はいません, because it's implicit that I'm talking about myself.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoBsMz

      I noticed a few lessons back, but why do we use が to say that there is a something and は when there isn't? Or am I missing something?

      There is a bathtub: お風呂があります。 There is no bathtub: お風呂はありません。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Praddd

      Why can't we just drop wa here? Assuming the topic is already clear and/or different. What's the purpose of wa here?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThunderCle

      「おふろがありません」のほうが「おふろはありません」よりいいだとおもいます。


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conraduouou

      do we always add 'o' at the beginning to make it polite?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

      There are two types of usage with the honorifics お(御)/ご(御)/み(御)/おん(御)/ぎょ(御).

      One is customary usage, where the described noun may or may not need to be honored. e.g. お箸(はし)"chopsticks"、お寺(てら)"temple"、ご飯(はん)"rice"、御曹司(おんぞうし)"son of a rich family"、御霊(みたま)"holy spirit"、御苑(ぎょえん)"emperor's garden"

      Another usage is to honor the subject of the sentence. Note that it can be different from the listener, but with lack of context, we simply assume the listener is the subject of the sentence. e.g. お名前(なまえ) "your name"、お子(こ)さま "your child"、ご機嫌(きげん)"your mood"、御社(おんしゃ) "your company"、御意(ぎょい)"your will"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giuliaguar940064

      Why is there "お"? I thought it was for polite questions


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

      There are two types of usage with the honorifics お(御)/ご(御)/み(御)/おん(御)/ぎょ(御).

      One is customary usage, where the described noun may or may not need to be honored. e.g. お箸(はし)"chopsticks"、お寺(てら)"temple"、ご飯(はん)"rice"、御曹司(おんぞうし)"son of a rich family"、御霊(みたま)"holy spirit"、御苑(ぎょえん)"emperor's garden"

      Another usage is to honor the subject of the sentence. Note that it can be different from the listener, but with lack of context, we simply assume the listener is the subject of the sentence. e.g. お名前(なまえ) "your name"、お子(こ)さま "your child"、ご機嫌(きげん)"your mood"、御社(おんしゃ) "your company"、御意(ぎょい)"your will"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacquelyn491772

      Just wondering (though it's not an option here), couldn't I also say 「お風呂はいない」?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Munna600073

      What is the difference between お風呂はありませ and お風呂がありませ

      Thanj you.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Praddd

      Why can't we just drop wa here? Assuming the topic is already clear and/or different. What's its purpose here?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gcwarren03

      I was confused about that too, i guess it's just the way it is for topics performing verbs


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noiregya

      The bathtub is a lie The bathtub is a lie The bathtub is a lie


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nana.san

      Why not 風呂はないんです?

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