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  5. "北へ行きます。"

"北へ行きます。"

Translation:I go to the north.

June 11, 2017

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vizzena

Is there a difference between へ and に? Or are they interchangeable? Is 北に行きます also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frrost

I dont think so. へ is more general than に. North is a direction, not a specific place so you use へ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magical8ball

へ is more vague than に. For instance: 東京へ行きます is like "I'm going <sub>towards</sub> Tokyo", where に would be closer to "I'm going <sub>to</sub> Tokyo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magical8ball

NOTE: へ used in this way is pronounced え


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Terrence53334

NEEDED THIS BIG TIME


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sword916

Boku no hero, 12th Octuber. Ok, sorry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silsool

I wish my 8ball gave me such detailed answers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarMarco4

Ikimasu is "present tense ", not "continuos"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alys.Winter

Yes, they can both be used in this situation but note that only に can be used when talking about times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thorigrim

Winter is coming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisRolando3

北は思い出します


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichiMochi1

I was thinking the same thing omg!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derek003

Why does it not like "I go northward?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boo913

I understand that to be correct too, just not accepted as an answer. report it and move on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebuuilt

Actually this is a better translation than "...north"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stevrn4

I would probably say I'm going north?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

Going is a gerund verb form. In Japanese there is a distinctive verb conjugation for it. This conjigation is just present tense, not the gerund tense. So no, yiu can't say that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tonkotsuLover

Gerund tense is vague. It could mean present progressive, past progressive, future progressive, present perfect progressive, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magical8ball

True but we are translating to English and we would normally say "I am going North" despite not being in the process of actually going north. Duoling is odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris538660

Learning a language is odd. You learn by making sentences that you would never normally make so you can better understand the differences in the language. You cant change the meaning of a sentence because it sounds better, you have to translate it to where it is understood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Takashi872457

The voice is not very understandable. It sounds like "spy iki masu". I had other people listen to it and no one heard "kita iki masu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

It clearly says "kita ikimasu". Maybe what's confusing you is the devoiced "i" in "kita", making it sound like "kta". This is a phenomenon which happens a lot in spoken Japanese. The vocal "u" also gets devoiced in some situations, look it up if you want to learn more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

u vocalization is devoiced whenever it is at the end of a word, except when part of a く、ぐ、ふ、ぶ. At least in every case i can think of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

Clearly you and your camaraderie need hearing aids. I re-listened to the line and the text-to-speech is pretty explicitly saying what's written


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Othique_

My answer was "Go north" and was marked wrong. However, I don't see how it can't be said by somebody giving directions and telling you to go north??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

You need to be careful when translating Japanese sentences into English because Japanese frequently drops the subject (I, you, they, etc), while the equivalent English sentence would require a spoken subject.

"I will go north", "You will go north", "He will go north", and "Go north!" have noticably different meanings from each other.

The first sentence is the most likely translation of 「北に行きます。」since the speaker is the default subject most of the time. But the second and third sentence COULD be right, based on context.

However, this sentence is NOT translatable as simply "Go north!" because, in English, a sentence written without a subject would usually form a command or instruction. In Japanese, this kind of sentence would require the verb to be in the imperative form or one of the various other ways used to tell someone to do something for you.

In the original sentence, the subject is only implied, BUT it does exist. This is a common feature of Japanese. Many things can be "gone but not forgotten". Like when particles are dropped or left out, but they are still there in spirit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

While it would be correct in a very specific context, the context in these is the most common/general context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I'm only a learner but I believe that would require the imperative, which according to Jisho is 行け.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

Be careful with the imperative form, it sounds very rough. The usual way to tell someone to do something is with the te-form. In this case, it'd be 行って.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swiftsign

"I will go north" not accepted. :s

I swear it sounds more like "kipai" rather than kita... is it just me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtUyaD
  • 1129

Is きた onyomi or kunyomi? 北 南 西 and 東 so far don't sound anything like Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kikones34

きた is kunyomi. 北's onyomi is ホク. You can look up the onyomi and kunyomi readings of a kanji very easily on the internet, I specially recommend jisho and wiktionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroBlaze

I heard "keep out, hickey must' which sounds like Yoda telling you to hide that hickey or you'd be in trouble.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snurf3

I spat my coffee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Takkun11

be careful at the north of the wall


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tnW73

Wait.. is this a kind of S. Korea defector?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aichan154267

We would normally say I am going north, not I go north!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hedwigechouette

"i'm heading north" rejected but I think it's ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaUsualSuspect19

Jesus Christ, you shouldn't be attempting to learn a truckload of languages at once!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiyamBhushan

I travel to the north


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

Well, when speaking of compass needle directions, generally in english you say "i'm heading north", instead of "I'm going north" or anything similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-.owo.-

I am SO salty. I answered "I head north." come on duolingo >::((


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kana332264

That is something i reported as a possible answer ages ago, please try and do the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmulGarg

Sono Kita Remembers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moonie145910

How come "It goes north" is wrong?


[deactivated user]

    Reported "I am headed north" as another correct solution; was marked wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snurf3

    i wrote " i shall head north" just because i felt kinda poetic and it marked me wrong. guess thats what i get for tryna be a smartass ;(

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