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  5. "You eat a big bread."

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rednaxela4

"You eat a big bread."

March 4, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ofir.baruh

i don't understand in which circumstances the adj. comes before the noun and vice versa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brianleahy

I'm with you. What's wrong with pain grande?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf
  1. pain is masculine => "grand" and not "grande"
  2. adjective placement: pls read this: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/adjectives_4.htm

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icsbicr

There's any easy way to remember it-- "BAGS"--nouns relating to beauty, age, goodness (quality), and size usually go in front of the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rednaxela4

This is not natural English...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aurelienche

Same thing for the French sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

As I wrote earlier about "pain", in a number of French regions "un pain" is a specific kind of "bread", ie a longer and larger baguette (@400g vs 250g). Therefore it is possible that someone eats "un grand pain", at least grammatically. However, chances are that only an ogre could eat "un grand pain".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aurelienche

Yes, you're right, I didn't think about that. Anyway, if we were really speaking about « un pain » as a type of bread, I think we would need a more appropriate translation than “a big bread”. I found “a loaf of bread” for « un pain » in my dictionary; maybe that would be better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rednaxela4

Makes sense to me. But I think Duolingo shouldn't consider a sentence correct just because it attempts to mimic the structure of the target language--it has to convey the meaning in natural language. "A big bread" is not grammatical English. A loaf of bread makes sense. This online dictionary clearly says that "bread" on its own is a noncountable noun in English: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/bread

When I started studying foreign languages back in high school, I learned very quickly that a thorough knowledge of one's native language is invaluable when learning a new language--and conversely, studying a different language is often a great way to become better acquainted with one's mother tongue. I'll always be glad I studied Latin!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katherinemarie

Are there rules/guidelines for whether to say the noun or the adjective first? I couldn't imagine "un noir pain" being proper, but "un grand pain" apparently is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katherinemarie

Thanks! I'm definitely going to remember that BAGS mnemonic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shadu

Why are we translating a sentence that would never appear in english? I can count the number of times on no hands I've heard some one say "you eat a big bread"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ggdw

why doesn't gros came after pain, eg c'est un pain gros


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The rule is valid for 95% of French adjectives: placement after the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/icsbicr

Who says big bread?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

did you report it?

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