https://www.duolingo.com/rednaxela4

"You eat a big bread."

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March 4, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ofir.baruh

i don't understand in which circumstances the adj. comes before the noun and vice versa

March 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/brianleahy

I'm with you. What's wrong with pain grande?

April 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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  1. pain is masculine => "grand" and not "grande"
  2. adjective placement: pls read this: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/adjectives_4.htm
April 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/icsbicr

There's any easy way to remember it-- "BAGS"--nouns relating to beauty, age, goodness (quality), and size usually go in front of the noun.

May 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rednaxela4
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This is not natural English...

March 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aurelienche

Same thing for the French sentence.

March 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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As I wrote earlier about "pain", in a number of French regions "un pain" is a specific kind of "bread", ie a longer and larger baguette (@400g vs 250g). Therefore it is possible that someone eats "un grand pain", at least grammatically. However, chances are that only an ogre could eat "un grand pain".

March 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/aurelienche

Yes, you're right, I didn't think about that. Anyway, if we were really speaking about « un pain » as a type of bread, I think we would need a more appropriate translation than “a big bread”. I found “a loaf of bread” for « un pain » in my dictionary; maybe that would be better.

March 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rednaxela4
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Makes sense to me. But I think Duolingo shouldn't consider a sentence correct just because it attempts to mimic the structure of the target language--it has to convey the meaning in natural language. "A big bread" is not grammatical English. A loaf of bread makes sense. This online dictionary clearly says that "bread" on its own is a noncountable noun in English: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/bread

When I started studying foreign languages back in high school, I learned very quickly that a thorough knowledge of one's native language is invaluable when learning a new language--and conversely, studying a different language is often a great way to become better acquainted with one's mother tongue. I'll always be glad I studied Latin!

March 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/katherinemarie

Are there rules/guidelines for whether to say the noun or the adjective first? I couldn't imagine "un noir pain" being proper, but "un grand pain" apparently is.

April 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/katherinemarie

Thanks! I'm definitely going to remember that BAGS mnemonic.

April 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Shadu

Why are we translating a sentence that would never appear in english? I can count the number of times on no hands I've heard some one say "you eat a big bread"

April 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Did you report it?

May 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ggdw
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why doesn't gros came after pain, eg c'est un pain gros

May 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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The rule is valid for 95% of French adjectives: placement after the noun.

May 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/icsbicr

Who says big bread?

May 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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did you report it?

May 13, 2013
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