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  5. "くだもの"

"くだもの"

Translation:Fruit

June 11, 2017

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijbrito

I don't get it, what is this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IWannaLearn3

Its fruit in Japanese written in a different way. (In a more appropriate way, to be exact).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulyAt5am

could you tell, why is it more appropriate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris753291

One simplified answer is that it helps reduce ambiguity in a language full of homophones. There's more to it than that, of course. An interesting read about it is here: https://japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/51756/if-kanji-are-necessary-to-disambiguate-homophones-how-come-its-still-used-bei


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

There are actually not that many true homophones as it might seem, but there are a lot of words written the same way. The thing is that Japanese has what you call accent tone. Words can be written the same way, but differ in intonation, and thus be identifiable as different words in spoken Japanese. In writing, however, this is not shown directly, and by showing the kanji you would know the meaning of the word, and then the pronunciation. This is also why I try to learn the basic meanings of the kanji and not every single reading. Not sure how that would work out, but it's worth a shot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeikokuKitsune

Words like 'hi' & 'high'; 'there', their' & 'they're'; 'wait' & 'weight'; 'hight' & 'height'; 'your' & 'you're'; 'no' & 'know'; 'hay' & 'hey'; 'none' & nun; '-phile' & 'file' and perhaps a myriad of other homophones are often heard in English I have noticed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not_a_thing

Perhaps because it's in kanji


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTKee-EnglishEng

What is that written in? Do you know why they don't use use kanji? More difficult?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Uhm...

Kana please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RamenDutchman

Ah thank you!

I didn't get he was giving the kanji for fruit >.<


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agentstinky

Imagine Domino's started serving fruit, and you said, "Cool, Domino's (kudamono), thanks for the fruit."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason45825

This is the stuff that helps me remember! Like how i remember "wear". I'm going to kill you (kiru) for WEARing my sweater...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weeb_Otaku16

Thanks so much, very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grace941148

I was thimking about dominos, but not the cool. Thats awesome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariodez

Sorry, is it related somehow to tabemono?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/illuminnaughty_

-mono makes it a noun, more specifically a "thing". [nomimono => drank thing => beverage] [tabemono => eaten thing=> food] [kimono = is the thing being worn on shoulders => special jacket] [bakemono = shapeshifting/hidden thing => shapeshifting monsters]

To return to the verb form you replace -mono with -ru. [taberu = to eat] [nomu = to drink (exception because already ends with -u)] [kiru = to wear (on shoulders)] [bakeru = to transform or be disguised (think tanuki or bakeneko)]

There are other ways to conjugate them, such as -imasu, which should be pretty hammered in with the previous lessons by now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nolfinkol

So if 'kudamono' is the noun form meaning fruit, what is 'kuda' by itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aki-kun

くだ is like the old equivalent of きの. き is this instance refering to 木 (tree). の being the possesive marker between nouns. 木 apparently could be read くin the past and だ was used as a possesive marker. So it literally means "thing of a tree". However, like you will see later on, some words like that with an old reading of a kanji have changed the kanji to fit more with the meaning of the word. So くだもの doesn't use the kanji 木 anymore but the kanji 果 instead, one of its meanings being fruits. That's also why the reading of 果物 might look like a strange reading if you know the readings of 果 and 物 since 果 usually isn't read くだ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ayaterrahmane

please take my lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azuranyan

Funny that 果 has some of the same double meaning of "fruit" as English does. Just as we have "fruits of labor" this character appears in 果たす (to accomplish). Pretty cool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josesl16

So what is its reading for "to accomplish"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpencerTup

果物:くだもの 果:くだ (counter for pieces of fruit) 物:もの ("item classified as ..."

Basically meaning "item classified as (counter for) FRUIT"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis250928

Why a word like 怪物 (kaibutsu - monster) doesn't have the "mono" sound in it, even if it includes the same kanji (物 - mono - object) as "kudamono"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seya858110

Kanji characters can have multiple readings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ayaterrahmane

くだもの は あまい です。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

Translation: Fruit is sweet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuicidalSpiders

I was always taught furuutsu was fruit...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamiKoskinen

They are both correct. Furuutsu is just a loanword from English for the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SherylHohman

"Could I have mo..re FRUIT"
ku-da-mo-no
くだもの
FRUIT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaUsualSuspect19

I was confused about how の was being used; I thought they were asking for an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M

The の here is not the particle. It's just a syllable/part of the whole kanji(s) of くだもの.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IWannaLearn3

Its just part of the word, ''no'' doesnt always have to mean one thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsJustonian

How would you know if a word has da (だ) or ra (ら), since the d and r sound so similar? Is it just a memory thing? I'm getting a little confused with this, so any help would be much appreciated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADO278496

It may be a little stupid, but I remember this as "kids love fruit monopoly". You have to do a little bit of editing when saying it as "kudamono" but it might help you... XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robin539971

What's the difference between くだもの and フルーツ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrakMoya1

フルーツ is a loan word from English while くだもの is the native word for fruit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna181296

Second one you said means sweet food midoriya


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigNerdSam

I have been writing こだもの instead of くだもの for a whole day. I need to start using headphones...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeHonked

Whenever I see くだもの I think of こども for some reason. I suppose fruit arr children of the tree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SondreMath1

What does it mean when some of the hiragana signs is marked i yellow?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

It's supposed to mark a new word (or character), but I'm not sure how well it works...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greatduckleader

What's the difference between くだもの and かじつ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaiMaiNameIsAni

Could Domino... For my fellow pineapple pizza lovers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Digamer360

Just remember that spanish word cuidamono


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBlair14

It sounds like "cuidemonos" in Spanish, meaning "let's take care of ourselves"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mackenzie842936

Fruit in this language sounds like "a domino".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jasumin17

0 sooooogoyyyyyy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nova50550

Im not fonised but my thing auto corrected it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Buggaboo-

くだもの= ku da mo no


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waifu_speedwagon

Every single person here has a somewhat ofba grasp of the japanese language and i dont know ❤❤❤❤ lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waifu_speedwagon

Everyone here has somewhat of a grasp on the language, but here i am, i have no idea whats what lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel503809

What about the plural of fruit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

It's the same. Japanese is a very contextual language and usually doesn't differentiate between plural and singular on the noun itself. It's only expressed through any other words that may be modifying it, such as numbers or words like "many".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KIDFaiz

Is it pronounced Ku-De-Mo-No?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsJustonian

Not quite, it is pronounced "ku-da-mo-no"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hakan238256

It actually means edible thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Horror_Sans

Hint: google translate is just a robot, and it's not programmed well. It isn't programmed to properly switch around the characters as needed in a word/sentence for correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zedlav

Why is it pronounced kudamono? The hiragana spells kudamome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eivinddos

の is no, め is me. An easy mistake to make when you're learning the kana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

You can remember の because it looks like a prohibition sign.

means no (の) smoking.

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