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  5. "このむらにはだれもいません。"

"このむらにはだれもいません。"

Translation:There is no one in this village.

June 11, 2017

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jansegre

So this is where the hat selling dog that climb trees killed a lot of people a long time ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaterinaRuud

That dog has become some kind of meme on the Japanese page. I love it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

If I could give more up votes I would. This is hilarious!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Couch_goguma99

Can't help but think that Duolingo lives there... haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medusa747

Atop the tallest tree Duo sits as he looks down upon the village with steely eyes, calling out an eerie "Hoo". The wind returns with its solemn reply, "No one". King Duo leaves nothing alive in his wake for as is it said "knowledge has a price"... and that price is blood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsymeRecker

I thought that price was ads after every lesson, or $9.99 a month.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

Or, blood. They just don't make that option as apparent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

この村には誰も居ません


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Namless2

I usually only see 誰もいません written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khymeira

漢字では「いません」を書くことが必要じゃないです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luisguichard

Could someone explain this sentence, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

The first half is simple: このむらには = "in this village". この = this, 村 (むら) = village, に = in, は = (untranslated, indicates the preceding part is the topic of the sentence).

The second half is slightly trickier だれもいません = "there is no one". 誰 (だれ) = who. Combined with も "also", this becomes 誰も = "everyone/anyone/no one" (depending on whether the is verb positive or negative). いません = "is/are not" (negation of います "to be/exist").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luisguichard

ありがとうございます!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I_amaury

Thanks for this explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helgemonster

Correct me if I'm wrong, but when talking about 'someone' in a positive sense, shouldn't it be 誰か? Or is that just for 何か/何も?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

だれか=someone. だれも=everyone/no one, depending on the verb.

なにか=something. なにも=everything/nothing, depending on the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

What would you say if you wanted to ask who else?

Like dare and no would mean usually?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mixxedyolyfe

Can some explain the difference between みな and だれも?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

みな or みんな(皆)really means "everyone", and is often used when speaking to or about a large (but somewhat specified) number of people. E.g. everyone in the room, all the people in your town/country, the world's population, etc.

だれも is actually closer to "who(m)ever", or "anyone". Contextually you can use it as "everyone", but it's more abstract; there is no particular group of people you're referring to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

みんなが長い間前に死亡しましたから。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karamitis

悲しい昔ばなしです!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/themrme1

I wrote "There isn't anyone in this village", which I feel is just as right as "There is noone in the village"..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

I'm inclined to agree. Did you flag it and tell Duo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marknld

kowaii...

Okay, like the hat selling dog, I'll bite.

kawaii is an i-adjective meaning cute. It has a double i-ending.

kowai is an i-adjective meaning scary. It has a single i-ending.

Be careful not to mix these two up. If you say kowaii (or kawai for that matter) you might be misunderstood. "That movie is cute," or even worse, "your child is scary!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

ええ、だいこわい。。。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RestRabbitRest

Reminds me of towns in Fukushima.. so sad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

And черновил (Chernobyl) in Ukraine, for the exact same reason.


[deactivated user]

    Чернобыль or Чорнобил


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stan84388

    I am Ukraine-born Russian... can confirm these are correct :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

    My bad, I think that is how it is written in Russian instead of Ukrainian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siroggak

    It's "Чернобыль" in Russian and "Чорнобиль" in Ukrainian. And it's completely okay, it's nice you mentioned that in the first place.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mzerrath

    Welcome to Silent Hill.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikRamakrishnan

    Sounds like what they'd say in AOT.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dante.I.

    This town's name is silent hill, collect four cultist items and you can meet a hat selling dog in a control room somewhere after completing your adventure here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/impromptu_stdio

    Since they used も wouldnt "nobody else lives" be more accurate than "nobody lives"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

    No, that's just how it works: だれ+も= "everybody" or "nobody", depending on whether it's followed by a positive or negative verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edikan2

    Why is nobody wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

    Because even if someone is wrong, they're still learning and that makes them right. That's why nobody is ever wrong!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesKitsune

    They meant, why is the word "nobody" marked wrong for this sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjmrozinski

    Does Japanese make a substantive difference between a town and a village?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luminary23

    My understanding is that まち(町) = town, while むら(村) = village.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelianos

    I've never made a difference in my mind between the two definitions before, so when tiles give both town and village as an option, I have a hard time telling which is which. ~ I guess a village is a bit smaller, and sounds a little more rustic or rural.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mel657418

    I believe villages are considered to have smaller populations than towns.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

    Every city, town, and village in Japan is strictly defined with a suffix at the end of its name. If it's a city, it ends with 市 (shi), and as hallelujah3 said, a town ends with 町 (machi), and a village ends with 村 (mura). The definition is supposed to be based on population.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeejayHerb1

    Why not 「誰もがいません」?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shinobusagi

    When used as a particle, も takes over the function of subject indicator, so there is no need for an (extra) が or は.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    Ahh. Ok, ty. That is good to know.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

    には = "at the" according to the hint so.. Why is it actually "in the"? I keep getting this wrong because I put "there is no one at the village."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    I'm not a native English speaker, but "at the village" sounds off to me. Like they're just outside the village or otherwise not really "part" of it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jules40223

    Fun fact... In Polish and few other languages, 'mura' means 'stone wall'. Kind of fun to think of a village as a fortified wall. Possible relation or just coincidence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

    Just a coincidence :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanicaBescae

    "There is nobody at this village" wasn't accepted, yet にわ is defined as "at the".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    Duolingo's hint system doesn't always work quite right since it's not customised for every lesson. It takes ways it's been translated in sentences and gives them as hints, without regard to context.

    Also, it's には, not にわ.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronkisimo

    is だれもい a word or is もい modifying だれ?おりがと


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen

    it's (だれ)+も meaning "everyone" or "no one" depending on the verb, if it's affirmative or negative; and いません from いる meaning "to exist" in its formal negative conjugation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec680675

    The answer given to me on the correct answer says: No 1 is in this village.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

    Duolingo has (or at least had, since this doesn't apply to the current recommended translation) this tendency to automatically convert written-out numbers into numerals without regard for context.


    [deactivated user]

      Sorry, is この村には誰もいしらないよね


      [deactivated user]

        Nope, actually is この村には誰もいないです


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasTobin2

        Duolingo's way to tell us learners about Japanese aging population?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo358607

        there are scary movies that start like this

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