"おさけはまったくおおくないですよ。"

Translation:There is not much alcohol at all, you know.

6/12/2017, 1:31:46 AM

118 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Michael396713

The "you know" here especially highlights some of the difficulty/problems trying to translate from a high-context language to a low-context language and having there only be ONE right answer. I don't know how duolingo can fix this, but it's definitely frustrating.

6/12/2017, 1:31:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Solomai
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I feel like this Japanese course is EXTREMELY tentative. And I think as it is right now, if you don't have a good background of Japanese (I'm around JLPT5 as of right now...), I don't think you can follow this course.

6/15/2017, 2:59:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Maeldryn

I think that the course is doing pretty good so far, all things considered. It is beta with only 4 or 5 people working on it? I think that's commendable. I just wish the site would quit redirecting me to another language course everytime I try to visit the Japanese forums.

6/17/2017, 5:52:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BreathlessTao

THIS SO MUCH!! I really don't understand why I can click on the link in the email and be taken to the right post WHEN I'M NOT LOGGED IN OR IN INCOGNITO, but as soon as I log in to actually reply, it just redirects to that "Japanese is not available on the web yet" language selection page. Like I'm not even trying to access the course itself???

7/19/2017, 8:02:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/N1chope
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It's available now, so you should be able to do it (at last) :D

10/14/2017, 12:25:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarudoshi

Try logging in first, then click on the link in your email. It worked for me.

9/15/2017, 3:29:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/John-JoseN
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As a brand new learner.... Well I had memorized the kana I guess... It is pretty hard. But I also feel I'm learning. A lot is a mystery at the start but it's like... Gradually revealing itself? That being said, I have had to use a bit of external resources, like videos to explain particles.

6/28/2017, 7:43:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ahANpg

Its always a lot faster to get help from a native Japanese teacher. Some of those nuances are basically taught at the elementary level. Certain things u can learn equally fast from videos or in a class. It will be a lot more difficult and time consuming for high context languages like Japanese, Korean, Chinese, if learning them entirely without direct instruction from a trained teacher.

7/20/2017, 4:01:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ashortnap

I agree. I've been doing memrise and duolingo collectively for about a year, I think learning through repitition and listening first makes it easier to grasp the concepts when I do look them up, or makes going through my recently bought Genki book a good refresher. Unless you are living there and/or taking a class, and even still, I think using many different resources is the best way to learn.

4/17/2018, 5:06:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ashortnap

Also: Research has shown that people who are rhythmically inclined have an easier time learning languages, so learning through audio/exposure and sentence examples to begin with is actually a good foundation imo (even if duolingo is still working out the kinks)

4/17/2018, 5:09:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FonzieSquirrel

B-but what if you're deaf?

7/27/2018, 9:13:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisPwise
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I empathize with you on the particles. What I have found in other courses is that particle use is "attempted" to be explained in each but to be honest, particle use is not clearly defined at all. The japanese themselves invariably will make incorrect use 'quite' a lot. I find Duo uses "wa" in a lot more places where previous courses have use "ga" for the same meaning, and then there is a lot of interchange between use of "ga" and "wo". On top of that where some courses will insist on particle use, Duo will leave some out. What really happens with particle use, is you will see a 'core' of common useage that everyone learns, while even by the end of course a fairly large 'fringe' area undefined, but if you become fluent, will just 'throw' a particle in instinctively and if not strictly correct, won't have any detrimenta effect on being understood.

1/21/2019, 5:13:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PStrotman

I don't know. I feel I'm doing pretty well and grasp the concept presented quickly enough. I've never taken a class, but i do have a copy of げんき that I sometimes use. Other than that the comments section does most of the actual teaching (Thanks guys!).

9/8/2017, 2:56:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jewe1s
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I worked through genki 1 about two years ago and I've found the course great for picking it up after a hiatus. But genki is really, really good and I'm still skimming through it again. Genki gave me a really good grasp of grammar structure and its essential beginner learning material imo.

But even Genki shouldn't be a learner's only guide. Duo certainly shouldn't

12/4/2018, 4:38:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Emer_Learns

I am actually testing this: I have never studied Japanese and only knew a few phrases and facts (there are multiple first person pronouns!) when I started. I'm trying to see how much you can learn from just Duolingo so I'm not joining a class or anything until I've completed the full duo tree. I am following the lessons pretty well, I suspect that you could reach okay if clunky conversational Japanese just from duo, if you do it every day, keep everything golden, concentrate, and repeat back the robot voice like a weirdo. You definitely wouldn't be able to reach fluency or learn enough kanji tho.

9/10/2017, 9:11:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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I'm interested to know how this works out for you!

2/1/2018, 1:23:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FonzieSquirrel

Good luck with the grammar and cultural differences.

7/27/2018, 9:14:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/failedlearner

I feel like there should be some explanation notes along every sentence and use of Kanji ( +furigana)

8/2/2017, 5:06:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander688324

Self taught for a few years now, but not jlpt5 yet and I've been able to test out of most of it til this point.

6/24/2017, 1:52:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/brunofrra
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I knew only the kana and some things. It's hard to follow sometimes, but I feel when I finish, I will be better prepared to take a more matured course, like some audio stuff on yt or tae kim grammar stuff. Obviously because this is in its infancy, I can't tell how will it mature. Best hopes for this courses and very thankful to the team!

8/3/2017, 10:11:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin597746

Human Japanese has been really helpful to me, as well. Well worth the price, I think.

9/23/2017, 4:22:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisienne
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Totally!! I think it is great to start learning Japanese with it! I love the detailed explanations there

11/25/2017, 9:58:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/lorisgirl

I was thinking the same. Was wondering if I would be able to follow if I hadn't studied before.

8/9/2017, 6:36:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/thenakedoracle

I am starting to think the same thing also ...

7/6/2017, 3:04:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Xiang-yu
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I didn't know more than 5 kanas 20 days ago and here I am at level 9. The pace is not too fast for me, my Chinese background and 5 years of experience watching Japanese anime definitely helped.

1/31/2018, 3:21:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RykerLaVelle
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I was actually approaching this in the completely opposite manner. I plan on doing the Japanese course on Duolingo with the hopes it would get me to where I need to be to comfortably pick up a JLPT5 study book. I'm not having any issues really following the course though (I do have a strong Korean language background which definitely helps with context). Maybe it comes down to personal learning styles.

7/28/2018, 1:37:59 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/John863934

Learn Japanese to Survive is really good for kana.

3/9/2019, 6:13:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/N1chope
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Actually I'd say that in this case "you know" is a sample of English also being quite context-dependent, since "you know" can be used literally to state that someone knows something, to ask if someone knows something, or even as an expression to emphasize what you just said (in which case it acts like the Japanese よ), and you only know what function it is doing by knowing how you "you know" is being used (its place in the sentence), from the intonation and from the context.

10/14/2017, 12:31:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MargauxMcD

I've tried using an exclamation mark to represent よ at the end of the sentence but the system won't accept it. よ is for emphasis.

12/12/2017, 1:53:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/hollt693

It didn't even give me an option to say "you know" (not that I'd have gotten that anyway...).

11/6/2017, 7:16:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinGerndt

So, "not much" + "too much" + "not" = not too much? Holy crap

8/13/2017, 11:46:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/raiesh
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I'm not sure how you got "not much" and "too much" and "not" (maybe duo hints, which I don't look at -- I prefer to look them up in a dictionary, tangorin or jisho). まったく translates to "really" or "truly" and 多くない [おおくない] to "not numerous" or "not much," which put together translate to "not really much" or, as V2Blast put it, "not much at all."

8/17/2018, 8:11:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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I translated it as "not much [alcohol] at all", which was accepted.

10/23/2017, 2:56:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/FranStalli

Duo translates it as "not much", then at the top of this discussion it says "not too much." Since those differences are the kind of thing the computer marks wrong, how do we know which one?

11/21/2017, 3:24:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IanSuckow

Yeah wtf

11/3/2017, 5:12:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashley457984

Doulingo, you have a drinking problem, get help.

9/4/2017, 2:27:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Denis021299
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Also stripping not washing clothes and partying for 24 hours problem

9/28/2017, 8:01:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dandelionmagic
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which could be from the drinking problem

1/19/2018, 5:04:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jacquelinemmm
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If one were to sayお酒はおおくないですよ, does it not also express the same idea of "there is not too much alcohol you know?" What's does the まったくadd to the sentence?

6/29/2017, 1:08:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/thenakedoracle

Perhaps some level of frustration to the fact that the speaker got a drink that did not have enough alcohol in the first place (๑´ڡ`๑).

I am saying this becuase if we take まったく by itself, it is typically used to express frustration with someone or something right?

7/6/2017, 3:10:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/_jclipse
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おおく just expresses the negative form of "much" or "many". まったくadds the "very" or "too much".

1/20/2018, 3:04:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterWilli1221

I would like to know this also. It is very confusing

9/27/2017, 7:11:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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"Mattaku" just makes it more emphatic. For me, your translation without "mattaku" matches the English fine.

2/1/2018, 1:27:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/azureviolin

お酒は全く多くないですよ。

8/1/2017, 7:57:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kbreddit

Why is mattaku included if 'absolutely not too much' is not accepted?

6/26/2017, 4:40:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
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まったくhere is more for emphasis, so if you have to translate, then add 'at all' at the end of the sentence.

3/14/2018, 8:19:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Boettius

I have to agree with this sentences. Never too much.

6/13/2017, 12:35:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexRodrgu375171

The Prohibition Era has kicked in again.

7/16/2017, 8:52:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobinGerndt

This English statement is an absolute mess

8/29/2017, 5:04:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Maeldryn

Is this sentence also useful to say "<b>It</b> isn't too much alcohol," as if referring to what was in your glass? How about in referring to how much one has drunk already?

6/17/2017, 6:06:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolaMuskee
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I also wonder if this could be translated to: it is not too much alcohol...

6/26/2017, 1:34:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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I think it should be accepted.

10/23/2017, 2:57:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishantil

This is not a good question.

7/26/2017, 3:42:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen344707

How would one differentiate alcohol in general vs. the rice wine sake?

6/28/2017, 11:43:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RossMurphy7

Sake is called nihonshu (literally, japanese alcohol) in Japanese

6/29/2017, 4:53:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidKames

They also call it sake. They even confuse it among thselves.... But that's Japanese for ya!

10/12/2017, 1:15:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/R2Pichu

Wrong

7/1/2017, 12:00:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Medbor
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The word for alcohol in Japanese is "osake". What we call sake in the West (rice wine) is called "nihonshu" in Japanese.

1/31/2018, 9:59:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Shauna-Gay3

In English you often you' ~you know?' To express frustration, sothe Mattaku could be in the same vain. ' have feelings, you know?'

7/26/2017, 2:46:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mccaaww

Is this sentence saying "there is little alcohol" or is this sentence saying "there is just the right amount of alcohol"? This is what's tripping me up

8/18/2017, 12:47:16 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/seakittens

Why is this "there is" and not "it is"?

8/19/2017, 4:17:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DEcobra11
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AA awaits you

9/23/2017, 10:41:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/boo913
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When should i translate おおい as "much", "too much", or "enough"? When is おおくない "little", "too little", or "not enough"?

Each of them seem like valid translations, but choosing the right one is giving me lots of trouble.

11/7/2017, 11:53:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ManoahKun
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Oh we're getting in the mood?

2/2/2018, 9:23:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ngochung72
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Is it a redundant use? まったく...and おおくない

9/7/2017, 12:25:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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Not quite. I think it emphasizes "not much [alcohol] at all".

10/23/2017, 2:57:59 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruben.Araujo

Having heard Naruto speak for so long this kind of sentences are second nature by now :)

9/16/2017, 12:36:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew968791

Could this also be translated to "There is not too much alcohol at all, you know"? Since まったく can be "at all" or "absolutely" and おおくない can be "not too much"

12/5/2017, 5:26:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Julie592508

There is not too much sake, you know. -- wrong? really?

1/3/2018, 4:47:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RykerLaVelle
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Is there a certain time to use the まったく(at all) vs the ぜんぜん(at all)?

7/28/2018, 1:34:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/harterk

This sentence doesn't make much sense in Japanese either. If the person drinking is feeling ripped off by a stingy bar tender the more appropriate grammatical layout would be: まったく、おさけがおおくないですよ。Or まったく、おさけがたりないですよ。 まったく is like an exasperated sigh signifying your disappointment. It can be used with a different meaning/context, but for this sentence it should be at the front.

2/8/2019, 12:47:31 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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From jisho.org:

全く

  1. really; truly; entirely; completely; wholly; perfectly​

  2. indeed​

  3. good grief (expression of exasperation)​Abbreviation, Usually written using kana alone, See also 全くもう

You're talking about definition number three, but this sentence is using definition number one.

2/8/2019, 3:58:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/harterk

True, 全く can be represented in each of these ways. I'm just struggling to picture someone actually saying this sentence in real life. Technically, it's grammatically correct, but I would never teach this sentence to students. It would be better understood in the: お酒が足りないですよ form.

2/28/2019, 12:29:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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I think your expectations of the course and what the contributors are expecting are two different things. You are expecting useful phrases, like a phrasebook. The contributors have certain words and grammar that they introduce in each lesson, and they have to make a certain number of sentences in the lesson using each word. They're building a sentence where they want to use the word "mattaku" and they want to use the negative form of an adjective we already know or an adjective that has been introduced in this lesson. That's the goal of this sentence.

全く~ない is similar to 足りないです, and that structure is common, but 全く~ない is used, too, and you want to be able to recognize it if you hear it. You would use this structure over 足りない in a situation where you feel that there is "enough", but that there is not "a lot".

2/28/2019, 1:03:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/harterk

I understand the intent of teaching the proper use of 全く~ない is a important step, but again I would critique that this is not a good sentence to use for this conjugation. It's a confusing sentence that leaves the reader doubting how they should interpret the wording. Something that might be more intuitive is: ボールが全く見えない。 I understand there are just a few contributors managing these lessons, and I want to congratulate them for their work. But if I was to throw in my two cents to help, I would implore them to change this sentence.

3/1/2019, 10:47:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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The course needs your opinion, but if you want your voice to be heard, the best place to leave feedback is the general forum or to submit a bug report. That's where people who can actually change things look for suggestions.

3/2/2019, 2:12:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
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Duolingo is designed to be a supplementary course. It has a rigid structure that the contributors (unpaid, potentially unqualified) have to follow.

2/28/2019, 1:07:42 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe264823

You are an eternal optimist.

For me it helped I had genki. I haven't finished the first book, but it got so complicated I tried so hard understanding that I had forgotten what I already knew.

I already memorized all exercises. Before fully mastering.

Maybe it's the residue knowledge that makes duolingo seem so efficient.

But to me it seems like it's really awesome and I finally remember even trickier stuff, that were always illusive to me.

2/28/2019, 1:28:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Turigamot

This sentence is awkward as hell in English. Can't they think of a better translation?

6/30/2017, 2:42:55 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BrittanyRo14

Ok so...i got the translation right because my answer made sense in English. Someone explain what just happened, lol. Help me!!

8/16/2017, 11:55:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BrittanyRo14

まったくおおくなく what is this i dont understand...

8/16/2017, 11:56:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/apatheiajane

I put "is there?" instead of "you know?" and was marked wrong. I feel like there would mean much the same in English, am I wrong?

10/6/2017, 9:48:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dandelionmagic
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yo is a new information marker, like if someone asked "what is your name?" you would answer "apatheiajane desu yo" to show it's an answer/ new information to them, at last that's what i was told.

1/19/2018, 5:07:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/V2Blast
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I think よ sort of emphasizes the previous point. To mean "is there"/"is it"/"isn't it" or some other phrase that looks for feedback/agreement from the listener, you'd use ね.

10/23/2017, 2:59:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GoldCrono
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まったく is still giving me problems. Another sentence had it and the correct answer involved "none at all" and marked "not too much" wrong. Now this one's saying "not too much" is correct, and marked "none at all" wrong. I'm confused--I highly recommend some explanation to be added to the lessons as part of the beta process.

1/13/2018, 4:30:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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まったくないです。

Mattaku nai desu.

"none at all"

まったく多くないです。

Mattaku ooku nai desu.

"not too much"

2/1/2018, 1:38:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick268669

Would mattaku be like Indeed in this case then?

12/25/2018, 3:01:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/sjhiga
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This is not a translation; it's a transcription. No serious English speaker would utter such convoluted nonsense.

1/18/2018, 11:45:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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Well, yes. When I translate something professionally, I go for what sounds the most natural in English. I certainly wouldn't use this translation. When I translate something on duolingo, I always try to be as literal as possible. My goal is to learn Japanese, not English. For me this kind of translation is much more conducive to learning.

2/1/2018, 1:36:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/euxneks
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What does this mean? Does it mean there is not a lot of alcohol or the amount of alcohol is just right? Does it depend on context?

2/7/2018, 7:51:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KazuriahBu

Whats the difference between おさけ,あさけ,さけ, and にほんしゅ?

2/14/2018, 6:40:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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sake - alcohol

お酒 osake - a more polite/honorific way to say "alcohol"

日本酒 nihonshu - Japanese rice wine, what we call "sake" in English

Never heard of asake. There's 甘酒 (amazake), which is a fermented rice drink with little or no alcohol that's often drunk on New Year's.

2/25/2018, 4:17:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

Q: Why does DL Japanese allow Teriyaki and sushi in English answers but not sake for おさけ? A: Because they want to stay in beta forever

2/25/2018, 3:32:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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Sake in English refers to "nihonshu", while 酒 (sake) refers to any kind of alcohol.

2/25/2018, 4:10:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

But we are translating INTO English. Under the heading of 'food' , liquor should be accepted but it wasn't . When I worked in a lab in Japan I would say (not write) "アルコールはどこですか". "Alcohol" is a chemical compound. At a party saying "we are out of alcohol" in English is kind of slangy. More likely the host would say "We are out of drinks {so go home everyone}" As someone on this thread pointed out, there are specific words in Japanese for whiskey, vodka, rum etc. SO DL Japanese fixer-upper person please keep alcohol in the lab and liquor at your parties.

3/15/2018, 2:27:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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I'm not sure if you meant to reply to me specifically? I was just making the point that "sake" in English and 酒 in Japanese are two different things.

I don't think there's anything wrong with "liquor" and I hope they add it. And I can understand why a person from a science background would associate "alcohol" with a chemical compound rather than an alcoholic beverage, but I as a layperson would more likely say "alcohol" than "liquor" (though of course I agree the most natural thing we say in English is simply "drinks").

3/15/2018, 4:40:59 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/xJashindaChan

Omg... I am going to s c r e a m, I swear only a minute ago my answer I typed in was the correct one last time aaaAAAAAAAAAA- kslajfskldfklsdjf I can't wait until this is out of beta because this is super frustrating.

2/26/2018, 3:15:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kurros
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"not too much" is just terribly confusing English and no-one should ever say it, let alone teach it to someone. It is especially confusing in this context because I cannot tell if it is being used literally or idiomatically, and it means opposite things in each case. This kind of ambiguity should be avoided in a course.

3/5/2018, 10:16:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaBod2
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Can the order of mattaku and ooku be switched?

3/17/2018, 2:11:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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No, "mattaku" is an adverb and "ooku" is half of the negative form of the adjective "ooi" which must be written together as "ooku nai"

3/17/2018, 2:31:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

Why is "There is not too much liquor, you know " wrong?

4/3/2018, 3:34:16 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

in English, what does 'at all' signify?

8/26/2018, 2:57:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/John863934

___ at all: Absolutely ___.

2/10/2019, 9:53:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/hO2m3dFv

Can this be used for alcohol content or does おさけ strictly refer to "alcoholic drinks" and not the alcohol in the the drink?

9/12/2018, 7:46:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe991725

I think maybe including a small image of whats going on might help with context

9/30/2018, 6:44:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/toastedbunz
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When you don't want to invite more people to your パーテイ一

10/21/2018, 11:40:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuad362475

i abbreviated you know to "y'know" and it got marked as wrong. DUO FIX THIS PLEASE!

12/28/2018, 2:53:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

PLEASE Please please tell my why "There is not too much liquor you know" is not accepted., Reported umpteen times

3/28/2018, 5:49:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Bwr12
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I love maria

4/3/2018, 6:09:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Shaun510462

It literate says Alcohol not at all, not much is there, you know. How did the Japanese mind come to this?

1/14/2019, 10:42:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/achipa19
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お酒は全く多くないですよ。

2/25/2019, 7:12:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

I submitted to DL Japanese that "There is not too much sake you know" should be accepted. I actually got a reply (!!! Thank you DL Japanese). But I still disagree with excluding sake as a possible correct answer.. The DL Japanese person that responded to me (thank you again) said that because there is an English term "Rice Wine", sake should not be accepted. I wager that if - in any restaurant or bar in an English speaking country - someone asked for "rice wine" the server would say "Do you mean Sake?" DL Japanese needs to loosen up with regards to Japanese words that are in common usage in English, especially food terms.

3/6/2018, 3:42:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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I think you're talking about two different things, though. 酒 (sake) means alcohol. English "sake" means "rice wine" or 日本酒 (nihonshu).

3/6/2018, 4:07:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamScott794079
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There is no such thing

6/25/2017, 2:27:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

why is 'sushi' OK in English and 'teriyaki' OK in English, but 'sake' is not OK in English. Come on DL get consistent or stay in Beta forever

2/17/2018, 4:49:05 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/IsolaCiao
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My guess would be because "sake" in English and "sake" in Japanese don't mean the same thing.

2/17/2018, 4:58:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
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IsolaCIao is correct. 酒(さけ) simply refers to alcohol in general in Japanese, whereas in English, it specifically refers to Japanese rice wine. Similar difference can be observed in 'anime', which in English specifically refers to Japanese animated TV/film, whereas in Japan, it just means animation in general.

3/17/2018, 7:41:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexMakaroff

Duolingo!!!!! "we don't have to much alcohol, right" should be accepted!!!! Fix it!!!! I am not here to learn English on your behalf!!!!!! Pay your experts and your sw engs already, GAAAAWD

1/9/2018, 8:06:14 AM
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