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  5. "I eat sushi with chopsticks."

"I eat sushi with chopsticks."

Translation:お箸で寿司を食べます。

June 12, 2017

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbreddit

お箸 (chopsticks) で寿司 (sushi) を食べます (to eat)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

お箸「おはし」
寿司「すし」
食べ「たべ」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naturalseasons

I typed exactly and it wouldn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R0dluvan

Is the honorific really necessary when talking about your own chopsticks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

I think it's very common from what I understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pez620341

I put in "sushi wo ohashi de tabemasu" which wasn't accepted... how would that be incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Readergirl52

I think Duo is just really strict on order; it wanted it to be おはしで first, and then すしを食べます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edwnx

it's accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernhardTe8

The verb follows を in simple sentences like these, whereas your notion was correct, your translation goes: 'sushi with chopsticks I eat' or some comparable version. Point is, particles dictate grammatical structure more than you may think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernhardTe8

Oh and to add, what you had correct was the direct object of the verb preceding を, but again the verb then needs to follow in whatever variant you'd like to add


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaniaChant1

When do you use the honorific?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

The best answer I have on that one is with native Japanese words, though for some reason not with the word for chestnut (栗). Women supposedly use them more than men, though nowadays more-and-more anything goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toastedbunz

Can someone explain the で please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhys.whit

it's helpful to think of で in this context as meaning "by means of." so, "I eat sushi by means of chopsticks." it indicates by what manner you're carrying out an action.

(though it can also in other contexts indicate in what place you're carrying out an action -- 公園で歩きました means "I walked in the park," as in "I walked, and the park was where it happened," while 公園に歩きました means "I walked to" the park, i.e., "I walked, and the park was my destination.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex378624

It is indicating what you are acting on the object with. Sushi, with/using chopsticks, I eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkaiKonekoChan

In the previous exercise, sushi had an honorific お but in this example, only the chopsticks do. Do the Japanese try to avoid using お too many times in a sentence? Or is it also perfectly fine to say お箸でお寿司を食べます ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flane4

I would like to know the answer to this too. Is only the first noun in the sentence (or the subject) given the honorific?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloyd76445

Ok listen. I know im American, but that doesnt mean i always eat with my fingers ok


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

I'm told the correct way to eat sushi, say at a formal sushi bar, is actually with your fingers and not the chopsticks. However you're not really supposed to eat fried chicken with your fingers which is the mistake us foreigners are always making . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MOO0505

No, it will fall apart and you will be sad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Animiles

I accidentally said お橋で寿司を食べます.. xD
I wonder how drunk one would have to be to try to eat sushi using bridges


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafasleite

I worte 食べる and it got wrong... Is the polite form really necessary in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJaguarM

On the side of chopstick wrappers it usually has おてもと. What is the difference between using that and 箸「はし」?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swisidniak

お箸・箸 is the word you'll always use/hear to refer to chopsticks.
おてもと is an abbreviation「お手元箸・おてもとはし」literally meaning "On hand chopsticks". These are chopsticks for personal use to eat with (as opposed to お取り箸 that are chopsticks used to serve food from one plate to another). It is a bit old fashioned/archaic and almost exclusively used on the paper wrappers of disposable chopsticks now.

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