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  5. "一万千円です。"

"一万千円です。"

Translation:It is 11,000 yen.

June 12, 2017

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoctorWho01

In Japanese there is an interesting number system. In Indo-europeen languages (English, French, Russian, etc) we use this,
1- one
10- ten
100 hundred
1,000 thousand
10,000 ten thousand
100,000 hundred thousand
1,000,000 million
And the same with million until billion.
In Japanese, they use like, 1 - ichi
10 - juu
100 - hyaku
1000 - sen ("ichi" and "sen" merge so we also get "issen")
1,0000 - man (ichiman) Let's put a comma here to get the idea
10,0000 - juu man
100,0000 - hyaku man (Million in Japanese isn't really million. It's just a combination of hundred and ten thousand)
1000,0000 - sen man
1,0000,0000 - oku
So, here we have four stages to make numbers instead of usual three ones.

Hope this is helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdiegosuarez

It was also the norm in many Indoeuropean languages as well, which is why we got the old fashioned term 'myriad' for 10000 (the same as man).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen

thz for pointing it out, I didn't know its etymology, so I googled it. indeed, it's from the Latin myrias meaning 10,000.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark_Dunan

It was Greek before it reached Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen

true. many countries that used to be influenced by Chinese have adopted this system. from what I'm aware of, beside Jpnese, there are Korean, VNmese, Khmer, Shan, Lao, Thai, Mongolian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZelieZazou

This is the same system as in Chinese, and the same characters are used in both languages (at least until ten thousand) with a similar pronounciation for some of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emer_Learns

Thank you, that's both helpful and interesting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ppittakhage

So it's a unique system, like the Indian lakh(1,00,000) and crore(1,00,00,000) system. なるほど。ありがっとうございます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderS504478

So... This is curious... Is it a japanese thing to add the comma after 4 zeros?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

if you are writing 一万千円 in number it would be ¥11,000 or just ¥11000。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YagamiHikari

え?

Doesn't 一万円 read as 10,000 yen.

11,000 yen should be written as 一万一千円.

でしょうか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jungerstein

It seems surprising, but in Japanese, 'thousand' can stand on its alone, but 'ten thousand' must have 'one' in front.

If you still doubt about it, please find images of Japanese Yen notes. The 1000 yen note has 千円 on it, and the 10000 yen note has 万円.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr456924

What is the character next to 万?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

If you are asking about the "壱", it's "one" written in daiji - a system "used in legal and financial documents to prevent unscrupulous individuals from adding a stroke or two, turning a one into a two or a three"¹ .

¹=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_numerals#Formal_numbers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awelottta

Sort of like writing a line under the zeroes or spelling out a number in a check?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

That's spectacular. So obvious once it's pointed out. I'd heard the joke about the kid learning Japanese and after the Kanji for 三 thinking they'd learned all the numbers. (I actually heard it about Chinese, but the joke's the same.) But I'd never heard about the formal numbering. Makes so much sense.

I will never be able to unsee the 三 in 五 and the 十 in 千.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FWrEd

I think it's the same for most romance languages.

(un) mil yenes

Dos mil yenes

Tres mil yenes

One thousand never has the "one"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadashiBro

"Thousand" can stand on its own, but in this context it sounds a bit awkward. It's still technically correct, but if you were saying this out loud, you would say 一万一千円. At least that's what my Japanese mom says.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeXP0v4

その壱は昔の漢字です


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aissa.kadd

So it literally is "one " ten thousand "" thousand" yen " mmmm understood ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

In english, you have to put "a" or "one" in front of hundred, thousand, and million. This is exactly the same thing, except for 100000000, 10000 and sometimes 1000.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariodez

So if it's 12,000 is ichiman nisen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lz_Ayala

That would be correct. 「一万二千円です。」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freezerque

Why is ¥ not acceptabke in the place of the word Yen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PholaX

Because it is not a word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

But it is the correct symbol for yen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabriel246188

I have two $.

Now do you see?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waniou
  • 1011

It is outside Japan but inside Japan, 円 is basically used exclusively.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awelottta

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yen_sign

It seems that the ¥ symbol is used before the number usually, and 円 is more common. Also, you can type the ¥ symbol with the backslash key while in Japanese input mode (at least on my Chromebook right now.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jendrej

I think the ¥ symbol was made for the Westerners so they didn't have to memorize strange characters. The Japanese use 円 everywhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleTransu

Wait ¥ isn't a strange character?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mithlas1

It is, but I only see it in advertising or video games trying to throw lots of unicode symbols at the users. Most signage and written communication uses 円.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/entelexia

It's the same as asking for $ for US dollar or € for Euro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Britt1110

I wish duolingo had a feature that told you the English meaning (in context to the lesson) what the Kanji meant along with the sound. Because I'm not confident in what I just learned. 万doesn't have a clear meaning and 千 was kind of easy to guess, and I already knew what はやく meant but I've never seen the Kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen
  • 万 (まん): 10,000
  • 千 (せん): 1,000
  • 百 (ひゃく): 100

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

はやく means fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielleTea

When you're responding to a sentence in Japanese, if you click each kanji in the sentence it will show you three short meanings (like in one or two words) and the answer in the senetence. Sometimes it also shows in parentheses how it sounds using hirigana. The meaning at the bottom often is the geenral meaning of that specific kanji, the meanings above it are what the kanji is within the sentence or word. This should be available on mobile for sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Won't accept "it costs 11000 yen" only "it is 11000 yen" so how can I say "it costs"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaLore9

In many contexts, I would say "it costs 11000 yen" is a valid translation. You should probably flag it for the course creators.

The verb "to cost" is かかる (which is often written in just hiragana, since the related kanji 掛かる has many other common meanings), so if you wanted to unambiguously say "it costs 11000 yen", you would say 「(それは)一万千円がかかります。」


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

That might be implied by context, but the verb here is just the です copula which is usually translated as a form of "be".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zansa777

If I was to give you a $100 bill, I could say "It is 100 dollars". But it would make no sense to say "It cost 100 dollars." That may be the case here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver747900

If I were to hand you a hundred dollars, I would almost certainly say, "Here's a hundred dollars," rather than, "It is a hundred dollars." To use "it is" in that context would sound strange and would make you sound like a non-native speaker.

If I were to say, "It is a hundred dollars," I would almost certainly be talking about a price. I can't think of any other context, off the top of my head, in which I would use that sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FAlter5

I accidentally typed 1100 and got it right with a typo. Well, it was a typo, but this one should not be accepted - and I can't report that my correct answer was wrong. Also, it should be ichi man issen, since (only!) after man, one thousand is issen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyrantRC

「一万千円です」

【いち-まん・せん・えんです】


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamil_Paul

As Chinese I was suprised by the actual meaning of一万千 hehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia482995

The male voice sounds like it's saying "ichi man sen yen des". I can clearly hear the y sound. Is this correct and if so is this pronounciation of 円 used in other contexts as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brent618678

This is kind of archaism. It used to be pronounced as actual 'yen' before. At some point people started to say 'en', but still wrote 'yen' for centuries until WW2 ends. Now they say and write 'えん', but 'yen' is still yen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobS.Fou

What costs that much exactly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeonMarkov

11000 円 is the equivalent of about $100 or 97€


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awelottta

So exchange rate is 1 dollar to about 100 yen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldCrono

"It costs 11000 yen" should be accepted, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

That might be implied by context, but the verb here is just the です copula which is usually translated as a form of "be".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zansa777

If I was to give you a $100 bill, I could say "It is 100 dollars". But it would make no sense to say "It cost 100 dollars." That may be the case here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver747900

If I were to hand you a hundred dollars, I would almost certainly say, "Here's a hundred dollars," rather than, "It is a hundred dollars." To use "it is" in that context would sound strange and would make you sound like a non-native speaker.

If I were to say, "It is a hundred dollars," I would almost certainly be talking about a price. I can't think of any other context, off the top of my head, in which I would use that sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharleeCas

Then would man and send become a sort of suffix for numbers? Ex: sanman (30000) or Gosen (5000) am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielYuji96

Kind of it. "Man" will be at the end of numbers with more than five digits and less than nine digits (10000~9999,9999) and "sen" at the end of numbers with four digits (1000~9999). It is mainly regular but there are some exceptions (bolded).

Ichiman = 1,0000 Niman = 2,0000 Sanman = 3,0000 Yonman = 4,0000 Goman = 5,0000 Rokuman = 6,0000 Nanaman = 7,0000 Hachiman = 8,0000 Kyuman = 9,0000 Jyuman = 10,0000 Hyakuman = 10,0000 Senman = 1000,0000

Sen = 1,000 Nisen = 2,000 Sanzen [さんん] = 3,000 Yonsen = 4,000 Gosen = 5,000 Rokusen = 6,000 Nanasen = 7,000 Hassen [はっせん] = 8,000 Kyusen = 9,000


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARMY_In_Distress

Every time i type in "yen" it corrects it to ¥ but when i type '¥ ' it says its wrong. Does anyone know why or is this just a glitch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kat0id

I don't understand why we need both 万 and 千 here if 万 already means 10,000? In my (flawed) logic having 万千 means ten thousand thousand. Can someone help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlarghBlar

Your logic looks correct here. "Ten thousand thousand" seems like it'd be the literal translation, which should basically mean 10000 plus 1000 to get the 11000 that this translation asked for. 万 is the 10000s place, 千 is the 1000s place. Therefor 一万 (10000) (1000) means 11000.

It seems like some numbers need the 一 even when referring to only 1 of that value place, but I'm not sure which ones need it and which ones don't since I haven't really looked into counting with big numbers yet. According to this lesson's Tips & Notes though, 10000 is one that needs the 一.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver747900

When you read 一万千 ("ichiman sen"), imagine that there is an implied "and" or "plus" between the last two numbers.

If you have a power of ten followed by a lower power of ten, you are supposed to add them together.

So, for example, "ichiman sen" means "ten thousand and a thousand" - i.e., "eleven thousand".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobsonJV

I used the Japanese keyboard to write "it's ¥11,000" but the ¥ character didn't render properly in the Duolingo text field.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naelitoh

万千円 = 11,000¥. 万 = 10,000. 千 = 1,000. 10,000 + 1,000 = 11,000.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EternalWintress

Interesting little site glitch: It kept giving me "correct, but there's a typo" whenever I answered this without the comma. I added it this time, and was told "you have an extra space".

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