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  5. "のみものがほしいです。"

"のみものがほしいです。"

Translation:I want something to drink.

June 12, 2017

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azureviolin

飲み物が欲しいです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessDan

I think the translation could be better...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akaSabertooth

Yeah I feel like this should be "I want a drink." Means virtually the same thing but still a better translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmEki

"a drink" has other connotations in English though, so it might be a confusing translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

1/13/18 "I want a drink" Acepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

and now i can joke that probably anyone doing this course has felt like asking for a drink. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1036832929

I put: 'I want to drink something' and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BreathlessTao

I'm a little iffy with translating every such to "want". The Japanese are ever so polite even in general everyday conversation, and here we come with what can easily come off as a demand instead of a polite request. Why can't this be "would like" instead, especially with desu also tacked on at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris538660

This sentence isn't a request for a drink, more of a statement of fact. Maybe you're walking with a friend and pass by a shop you might say this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeVancouver

So, would a better way of translating this as a statement be "I'm getting a drink" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

No. It's just a statement about something you want. It's not a request or a statement that you're actually getting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueRaja1

"I would like ~" is taught in previous lessons. It's 「〜ください」which literally means "~, please". You'd say it, for example, to a waiter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

This is all nonsense. "I would like" is more polite as it's in the subjunctive and so more abstract. It's hardly a concrete demand. Still "like" is terribly informal so use it however you want, just don't expect the general grammatical rules to change . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattNewell99

I want a drink. Duolingo: You are correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanielB69503

I used "drinks" instead of "drink" and got it wrong. Shouldn't both be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Yes. Report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HumanLaw

not really the 物「もの」turns a verb into a noun: 食べる= to eat 食べ物= Food similarly, you would not say "I want to drinks something" in English the correct sentence would be "I want to drink something"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

I assume Nathaniel wanted to say "I want drinks" instead of "I want a drink", which would be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nottakenyet

Why not "I want a beverage"? That's what I put seeing that in English, "I want a drink" can imply something along the lines of 酒飲みたい


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koichi81957

I would like .. is less demanding, IMO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

The Japanese is straightforwardly saying "I want a drink". "Hoshii" is a word you would mostly only use among friends or people you're close with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

This sentence is not a request, but a statement of desire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timotmcc

"I want to drink" should work here? The "something" is implied


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

飲み物 nomimono - (noun) drink/beverage

飲みます nomimasu - (verb) to drink

It's most literally saying "I want a drink (beverage)", which to many English speakers sounds like the person wants an alcoholic beverage, so rather than the "something" being implied, it's there to make the translation clearer I think.

I want to drink would be 飲みたいです (nomitai desu).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/foolonthehill

Could you say this without the もの? what do those characters do? Does it convert it into a verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueRaja1

物(もの) just means "(physical) thing". のむ means "to drink", while のみもの means "a drink".

The technical term for turning a verb into a noun is "nominalize", and the words used to nominalize are "nominalizers". In Japanese, the usual nominalizers are こと "(non-physical) thing" and の "one". もの is only used in very specific cases, like this one. I don't think it's considered a nominalizer; のみもの is just like a compound word in English, and you should treat it as such.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tumbkerer

This is so helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert121815

I feel like there would be more in the Japanese sentance for "something to drink" as opposed to "a drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Not really. "Something to drink" in this sentence is the same as "a drink"; it refers to any kind of beverage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languages_jo

The Japanese sentence they give translates to "I want a drink". The translation of the English sentence ”I want something to drink.” would be 私は何かをのみたいです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanFogart4

No, that'd be, "I want to drink something."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/painkiller107404

私はのみもの好きです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/painkiller107404

私は飲み物をしたいと思います


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NihonBengoshi

Me too, after this lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashrazel

Is« I want drink/ to drink» wrong in english? Because it marked wrong here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucarhammon

"I want to drink" should be accepted...

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