https://www.duolingo.com/Linda531423

Pronunciation

I feel I can't go further in this course since I have no idea how to pronounce what I'm learning! Is there a tool for this?

1 year ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Pancho_Delanave
Pancho_Delanave
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I found the following video helpful. Maybe it will help you too. It's only about 15 minutes long.

Sounds and Spelling of Irish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nifitsa2

Thank you so much for this link. It was very helpful.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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Merci, you're just at Basics 1! Irish course here has natural voice, which is a great edge, but it also means not every word or sentence is pronounced. Not sure how much experience you have with Duolingo or language learning in general, but you usually should keep at it until you get the hang of things. There are always certain rules for pronunciation, and you pick them up as you progress through the course. Go ahead, make mistakes and learn! :-)

Duolingo will only introduce you to the language, nothing more. For really learning a language, you should immerse yourself; TV, radio, books. Take a look at "Irish Portal [Under Construction]" (you'll also see it when you enter Discussions) for "Links and Other Resources", it should give you some pointers.

Go n-éirí leat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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The Irish spelling is pretty regular and well suited for the language, so once you know how it works, it's easy to predict the pronunciation of an unknown written word. Unfortunately however, it's quite different from what other commonly known languages use, so it takes some getting used to.

The one thing that tends to confuse beginners most is to understand why so many vowels are written and half of them aren't spoken. The problem that the Irish spelling must solve is that Irish has just too many consonants for the few letters in the alphabet. The solution for it is that every consonant letter is used for two different sounds, called the broad and slender versions of the consonant. Which one it is, depends on whether it is next to e/i (slender) or a/o/u (broad).

You may know the same kind of distinction from Spanish "c" or German "ch", Irish just does it with every letter. The major difference is that Irish also allows a broad vowel sound next to a slender consonant. In order to make it clear that the consonant is slender, another slender vowel is inserted in the spelling, but it is only a modifier for the consonant and not spoken as a vowel. For example as and ais have the same vowel sound, the difference is just whether the "s" is spoken like English "s" (broad s) or like English "sh" (slender s).

So when you encounter multiple vowels in a row, the challenge for you as a beginner is to find out which is the one vowel in the given combination that is actually pronounced, and which vowels just indicate how the consonant next to them is spoken. (Long vowels, i.e. those with an accent mark, are easy: They are always the pronounced one.)

Now that you know what to expect, you can try these links for a start:

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ainm10
Ainm10
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Lots of tools exist that could help. Abair_dot_ie is a synthesizer for each of the main dialects. Type in words or sentences and it will say them for you. Teanglann_dot_ie pronounces loads of words and a smaller number of phrases in each dialect. Many other tools also exist.

If you really want to learn the language though, I suggest searching for 'TYI1961 Miles Dillon' and following links to download a PDF with embedded sound files. A lot of the vocab is anachronistic (the '1961' gives that away), but I believe that the language taught is closer to real Irish than this app. The app is useful and user friendly but I feel that choosing a dialect and going with it is better than the made up language taught in schools and on this app.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ainm10
Ainm10
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I just noticed that Patbo already suggested the teanglann site. They gave a link to the sound bit, which is what you seemed to want. That said, it is an excellent tool beyond simply a repository of sound files. BTW - you may find that our links out you into the Irish form of the site - you can opt for it to be displayed in English, so don't panic if don't have enough Irish to understand the site yet!

1 year ago
Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Irish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.