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  5. "わたしといっしょにコスプレしませんか?"

"わたしといっしょにコスプレしませんか?"

Translation:Will you cosplay with me?

June 13, 2017

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avidrucker

It's 和製英語 (Japanese English) in Japanese ("costume play" became コスプレ ") and then it came back to English as "cosplay". Interesting, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mystiques-wish

Same as anime coming from "animation", but now recognised as its own genre :) It's like it's come full circle :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

It's a medium/art form, not a genre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shizuno

not sure why this is being downvoted when it's true


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtthwcrlsn

or the word "bodycon"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LangNerd88

I believe this should translate more like "Won't you cosplay with me." At least I think this is it's pragmatic equivalent in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

The Japanese sentence is a request. Your sentence should be accepted, but the English translation sounds more natural in the positive than the negative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julestheman

I didnt realize cosplay was a verb in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VCSD

I cosplay'd last week...

For example


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyJe7QcR

Technically it's a noun, but you can slap する onto pretty much any foreign word in Japanese and verb it that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

That makes it a verb phrase though, not a verb. That means it's like putting "do" or "make" before the noun in English. Truly verbing nouns in Japanese is rare. The one example I can think of is "to Google", which becomes the verb ググる in Japanese and does not need する.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

On the whole that could be a good thing. Maybe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasleft

"Why don't you cosplay with me?" marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

It is wrong. Your answer implies that the other person has expressed unwillingness to cosplay which isn't true. A more accurate translation would be "Won't you cosplay with me?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rgondo2013

"Why don't you cosplay with me." can be a statement or request but is softened because it's being asked as a question. I don't think he means the other person expressed unwillingness. I use this form all the time "why don't you do ___" to make a soft request. I guess this is too subtle though maybe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS.6

The most romantic exercise I have seen on the Japanese course


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasleft

Haha, maybe one of the most weak category in the Japanese. As the Japanese is not so emotional apparently.

Please try like this: http://www.imdb.com/list/ls051850302/

There are a lot of traditional romance, but those in the list are mostly for the younger generation. I can recommend 'hidamari no kanojyo' in the list.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anguria

I really don't like this lessons


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crysenley

Should be "Won't" not "Will".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WisconsinH

Invitations and requests like Mサイズのはありませんか (is there a medium size one?) are often done in the negative form but translate to English as a positive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crysenley

Yeah, that's true. I guess it just frustrates me a bit when Duo insists I translate it more "naturally," even though natural is vastly different between different English dialects. :'V To me, asking in the negative is still very natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuzuling

Did it not accept "won't you cosplay with me?" Seems like it should. You can always report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

I don't know if "won't" is, but "Will you not cosplay together with me?" is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

But asking in the negative often has a different nuance. For example, "Do you have any money?" does not have the same sense as "Don't you have any money?" In the latter case, the speaker is surprised that the other person doesn't (seem to) have any money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenJammin234988

A perfect first date.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

私と一緒にコスプレしませんか


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianWill829460

That's one hell of a way to ask for a date ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaroEnrico

Duo gave 'dress up' as the translation for cosplay earlier in the test. Now it rejects it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

I would say "play dress up" could work, but is more childish than cosplay is. But just "dress up" is more used for putting on formal/expensive clothes than putting on costumes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fujinana

It's like a propose to an Otaku.. Boy: Will you cosplay with me?! Girl: blushes YES! Lolol...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walgen

if anyone was curious what the chinese characters would be as opposed to a loanword, it's 角色扮演 (literally character dressup acting) or 真人秀 (real person show, show being a sound loan of english). the more you know, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

I think 角色扮演 and 真人秀 are Chinese. They are not Japanese 漢字.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/insincere

Is watashi to isshoni always translated to "with me"? What is the literal translate? "Me and together"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolkZayets

In this case, "to isshoni" means "(together) with", as in "with someone".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cperrius

To means 'with' also, not just 'and.' These are idiomatic, dont need to be literal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daze2312

I answered with "would you like to do a costume play with me?" and they told me it's wrong despite cosplay literally means costume play. oh please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricPooley

A costume play = costume theater. Cosplay = costume fun activity


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandyn_Davis

This honestly made me burst out laughing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Why isn't 一緒に translated into English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sotnosen93

It's implied in the "with". Translations using "together with" are also accepted (or should be reported if they're not).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wade91286

I was thinking, seeing 私たち と一緒に, as won't you join us rather than me. However perhaps it's the use of と一緒に changes it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

This sentence doesn't have たち.
Maybe you were confused by the kana わたし?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/floomo

Now there is a sentence I never thought I'd ever write. Even less likely than "my dog sells hats"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Terravoltai

What is the purpose of し in this and many other semtence ends?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyJe7QcR

コスプレ is a noun, not a verb. Some nouns can be turned into verbs by attaching する/やる. To use する in this case with ます, it is turned into し. All combined, you then have コスプレします (to do cosplay).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sihaz

According to Duolingo, Cosplay = Dressing Up, but only sometimes. :-(

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