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  5. "かれはパンツをはきます。"

"かれはパンツをはきます。"

Translation:He wears underwear.

June 13, 2017

82 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gonzogulp

I'm relieved to hear it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikutard

But how does she know ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

Semper ubi sub ubi. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nekogaijin

My Japanese wife says you would rarely hear pantsu for underwear. If someone says pantsu, she thinks long slacks, not underwear. She also said the sentence itself sounds so awkward that she wonders if a non native is creating the lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

This was my immediate thought too. Pants = trousers. Shitagi means underwear/undergarments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroVulpes

It's interesting to see that 「下着」 uses the kanji for "down"/"under" combined with the kanji for "wear", which makes it quite intuitive and a very direct counterpart to the English "underwear".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I know, right? Kanji is awesome. And beautiful. And awe-inspiring. And fascinating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Domino57005

But very hard to learn, sadly (at least to me, but I think it’s common to think it’s hard)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WaldoGonzalez

Oh its hard, mindblowingly hard. counterintuivite for most of the world. Dont think less of yourself no matter what others say. Just grind it and you will start getting it. /thumbsup


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cgottsch

I find that surprising as my Japanese teacher, also a native speaker, said pantsu mean underwear, especially panties. Its possibly a regional thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I checked with a friend recently - she said pantsu has been used to mean underpants but currently people use both pantsu and zubon for pants/slacks (also I'm guessing that pantsu is prob also used for underpants still, the meaning is evolving so that now it is used for either). She didn't say anything about shitagi. I don't think I asked about that and my guess is it's probably not used all that often now - not sure what the modern word for underpants might be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScorpioDraco

I lived and went to school in Japan in the 1990's. At that time, we used pantsu as underwear. I don't know nowadays, though...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadameSensei

Japanese teacher here... I have always used パンツ to mean WOMEN'S underwear, the lacy kind. It's from the word "panties."

However, young whippersnappers nowadays are using it to mean "slacks/ pants." But I would never ever imagine パンツ to be tidy whities or boxers. I would use したぎ(下着) (literally: underclothes) for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dandelionmagic

in anime pantsu is always panties and my other lessons said it's only panties never pants so that's what I've been going with. :shrug:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gwyneth941820

So what is the more common way of saying it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasmarkk099

Pardon the Romaji but, I've concurred: PANTSU- Panties/Lingerie, ZUBON- Pants/Trousers SHITAGI- Boxers,Briefs, Undergarments With 'Pantsu' being the most versatile term all around.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butsuri

For what it's worth, a Google image search for "パンツ" gives me a fairly even mix of underwear and trousers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crash_boom_bang

=) I guess most foreign language learners do that - if in doubt, check Google images ))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeJ87

Then you pretty much have rosetta stone for free.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Is shitagi underwear in japanese? What then is japanese for trousers? ..zubon? Or is that outdated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Yes. shitagi means underwear. Please see comments directly above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leo456036

In all anime I've ever watched "pantsu" have been refering to panties. Maybe not the best source, but it's definetely used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

みんながパンツを履きますね


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyYoung

私はしてない! 履きってない!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HadiAljishi

Btw it's 履いてない*. The original verb is 履く.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mttscz

よかったですね····


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBanci

Whats the difference between kimasu and hakimasu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hoshizukiyo

"Kimasu" (きる) is the general verb for clothes worn on the torso (shirts, sweaters, etc.), while "hakimasu" (はく) is for things worn below the waist (underwear, pants, socks, shoes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronCYA

Very useful! Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

Hakimasu clothing that you "step into" so pants, socks, shoes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

That sound like a more precise/useful definition! Then would overalls, coveralls, and footie pajamas all go with hakimasu--even though they cover your torso--because you have to step into them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

I would certainly think all the clothing items you mentioned would be used with hakimasu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeqiHan

彼はパンツを履きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiceblocked

Did not accept "He wears panties." Very odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamonJiang

hmmm.. in every single anime ive watched, not hentai mind you. pantsu is always used for underwear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelDowdy

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lilah.Oxana

I was taught that パンツ specifically referred to women's panties. So... this is an awkward sentence for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FloofyBoofy

I've also heard it used to refer to men's underwear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlvaroJoel

Dictionary http://jisho.org/search/underwear says -したぎ - 下着


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crys_tal

I looked on Jisho.org: 履く = "hakimasu" = to wear (lower body, waist down) 着る = "kimasu" = to wear (from the shoulders down)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DABurnside

I've read the comments about underwear vs trousers vs pants vs zubon (trousers) vs shitagi (underwear). I've tried "slacks" (that's a no). I haven't tried "panties." I translated this sentence to a simple, straightforward "He wears trousers." DL marked it incorrect and indicated it means "He wears underwear." Okay. I hope I never encounter this sentence again because I don't see the point of discussing underwear in general conversation unless it's bullet-proof or has magical properties. On a positive note, I did learn the difference between kimasu and hakimasu from several comments. Thank you for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasChen316332

WTF I write she! lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Why is "he wears an underwear" not accepted by DL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kltran
  • 2977

"Underwear" is one of those English words that are uncountable, meaning you can't assign an indefinite article to. Saying "an underwear" will sound very strange to a native English speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woa7dSD5

Just did a Google image search for パンツ and got men's underwear, women's underwear and long pants/trousers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SparrowPaige

It'd be a little weirder if he DIDN'T wear underwear...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dottiedotdot

パンツ is pants not underwear right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Silsool

Well pants in British English, which is underwear in American English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telemetry

It's underwear in some British English too, just one of those words that can have different meanings depending on where you're from (with hilarious misunderstandings). Nice to see Japan can't agree on what it means either!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguDemo

I think it might be referring to underpants here?? I'm not entirely sure. XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hiba226886

Pantsu is underwear. For a while British English was posh and foreigners preferred to learn British English over American English. There are hold over words from this period of time. Pantsu is one of them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

Ah, the original English.

I'm kidding, but seriously though, I think most English as a foreign language curricula are based on British English and received pronunciation, at least in Europe. That's not to say people actually use a British accent when speaking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FloofyBoofy

It could mean either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saliast

Pantsu..from what i recall learning.. Is pants.. Slacks.. Trousers... So..what would underwear be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrew.h.wu

Would not recognise パンツ as knickers lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

彼はパンツを履きます。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xiang-yu

There's a Japanese song for パンツ (終わりなきパンツ / endless underwear). I really enjoyed the rhythm. Hope I can understand the lyric after I finish the course. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hZopRaC7-E


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hollt693

彼はフリーボールをしていません。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aelier

i would be concerned if he didn't


[deactivated user]

    Glad we cleared that up.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hoovard

    Please allow 彼


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParkerOlsen

    I sure hope he does


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilovelucifer

    shouldnt it be「下着」instead of 「パンツ」


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

    i typed "he wears pantsu" and is wrong? then what's the right answer then


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaLydiate

    Pantsu is the Japanese word in romaji - it's not English. That's why it was considered incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natalia_indo

    LOL, its joking I think. Make me not stressed again


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquanimousLingo

    Don't use this word, you will be laughed at because it usually connotes "panties". Use "shitagi" 下着 to be safe.

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