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  5. "三年前にタバコをやめました。"

"三年前にタバコをやめました。"

Translation:I stopped smoking three years ago.

June 14, 2017

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Obstructor

The real question is why is this in classroom 3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauriannedaC

Apparently, classroom 3 is the kind of stressful environment where one is likely to make the acquaintance of folks who believe they have stopped smoking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

Smoken in the boys room.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reece66734

Everybody knows that smoking ain't allowed in school!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Tell that to all the teachers in the parking lot...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Visit a Japanese school and count how many teachers smell like smoke...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

Worse, look up すう on Jisho and the example sentence is about "High school students who flagrantly smoke in class"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

三年前にタバコを辞めました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

As with the other sentence, could the kanji here be 止める?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Googling "タバコを辞める" gets me Did you mean: タバコをやめる.

Seems you write it in kana or as 止める.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jersebas

Seems you write it in kana or as 止める.

Confirmed by: http://jisho.org/word/煙草を止める


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.5.13 Haha... the kanji 辞める is usually used for quiting a job or leaving a formal position


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tate1650

Why do you need 前 there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

前 (mae) means "before" or "ago", so it attaches to the time frame.

3年前 (3nen mae) - 3 years ago

3週間前 (3 shuukan mae) - 3 weeks ago


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Israndiel2

Could you please tell us all the meanings of 前? Found quite a few meanings already.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

All of the meanings? Here's a few if someone wants to add on to the list.

With specific time periods, it means "ago":

5分前 (go fun mae) - 5 minutes ago

When used to talk about what time it is, it means "before":

2時10分前 (niji juppun mae) - 10 minutes before 2 (1:50)

With general periods of time, it means "previous":

前の月 (mae no tsuki) - the previous month

When used about a physical position, it means "in front of":

家の前 (ie no mae) - in front of my house


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.5.13 Ok, but this one isn't related to time or position.

男前「おとこまえ」

good-looking fellow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aichan154267

I gave up smoking is quite natural!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarteRouge

you are right it is more common to say "gave up"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

Where I'm from we'd say "quit". But "give up" is actually a pretty accurate definition for "yamemasu" in general and I think it should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec680675

Rip, "3 "not accepted. But "three" is.

I is confused.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You should submit an error report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsakNygren1

Why isn't "three years ago I quit tobacco"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsakNygren1

"correct" is supposed to be between the quote and the question mark.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

That should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chungmcl

おめでとう!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan32186

Apparently, I've quit smoking 3 years ago, is unacceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

In American English, you wouldn't use the present perfect (have quit) with a time frame like "3 years ago".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauriannedaC

A bit confusing how Duo accepts quit in one and stopped in the other yet it's the same word and almost same meaning..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1036832929

Can the English translation of this phrase also be... "It has been three years since I have stopped smoking." ...or would it be written differently?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate399029

Generally, you wouldn't use the present perfect in this context, but without that the sentence is "It has been three years since I stopped smoking" which sounds fine to me

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