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  5. "このみせにとりにくはありますか?"

"このみせにとりにくはありますか?"

Translation:Does this store have chicken?

June 14, 2017

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benienhau

Literally とり(鳥) means bird or chicken andにく(肉) means meat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

鳥肉「とりにく」can mean either bird meat and chicken meat, while I also found 鶏肉「とりにく」that is an homophone and means only chicken meat. Note that the first kanji in 鶏肉 includes 鳥 as part of it. And since Doulingo does not give us kanji in that word, we don't know which one to use. Let's wait for a native or advanced student to clarify if one is more common than the other or one is not used often.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

Reading other comments (Hiba Akaiko), jisho.org gives some discordances in meanings. Searching for とりにく gives both 鳥肉 and 鶏肉, with the same pronuntiation. Looking for 鶏 alone, it is pronounced as「にわとり」, meaning both chicken (the actual living bird) and chicken meat, and says that 鶏肉 is pronounced「けいにく」. Any native could help us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i-am-serious

My wife said they dont eat many other birds so she always means chicken when saying toriniku (鳥肉)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MardukSky

どうもありがとう。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/headchop

I ate sparrow when I was in Tokyo. I don't recommend it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haomaru87

A native told me niwatori is used much more often to refer ti chicken meat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham692890

No when talking about meat to eat it's 鶏肉 とりにく


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe264823

Isn't yakitori not also always chicken? At least on Japanese state education , they said yakitori would be chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraxWillia

この店に鶏肉はありますか?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nush_W
  • 1872

You'll want to use 'ni' rather than 'de' here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James483647

此乃店丹鶏肉波在りますか、if you really wanna go kanji crazy. Though I'm not sure with the particles, so correct me if I'm wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesse319162

While I don't know specifically, very few particles in Japanese can be written in kanji (and almost always are written in hiragana)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

Is it wrong to say "Is there chicken AT this store"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

No, that's fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MGJScully

Yours is a better translation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leung39244

Does this shop have chicken meat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dear_Deka

Why is it は in this case? I would have assumed to use が.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

I posted the same question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langston769884

Does this store CARRY chicken? (Amr. Eng.) Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

I have learned "が+ありますか" in my textbook. Why is topic particle used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarneyHoll

Rejected 'chicken meat'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

That's redundant in English, as "chicken meat" is usually referred to simply as "chicken".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Furanzu4

I don't understand why the は-particle is used instead of が in this sentence. Can someone explain this please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katharinalouise

Does it have poultry at this store l. I think the translation could also be this way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snailwood

that's not a phrasing a native speaker would use, but "do they have poultry/chicken at this store" would be fine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MGJScully

The verb "to sell" is the wrong translation here. Poor choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zackarotto

But can toriniku mean rabbit meat? You know, because rabbits are birds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ameliamimi1

I find it interesting how when we're translating texts, duo expects literal translations from us, but when duo gives you words you have to use, you can translate it by meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivalaashutosh

Is there any chicken meat wasn't accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ForgetUmbrella

You didn't say anything about a store.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Logan500030

I was under the impression it was quite common to just hear チキン instead. Was I misinformed or is this phrase being taught 'just for the sake of knowing' so-to-speak?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafa279213

How is it not chicken *meat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

Why does DLJapanese introduce 鶏肉 at the very beginning of this lesson than give us とりにく in this sentence????? Can someone from their staff explain the pedagogical thinking at work here? There is no way to 'report' "you aren't making sense"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham692890

OR Do they have chicken in this shop? BUT NOT accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/satwita

Unless chicken was already being discussed, if you just went up to a store clerk and asked out of the blue if they had chicken, wouldn't it be more common to use が as the particle? I see four or five others with the same question. Could someone help us out?

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