"Nous sommes mardi."

Translation:It is Tuesday.

March 5, 2013

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/M.Z.
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Why is it not "c'est mardi" or "il est mardi"? What in the world does "nous sommes mardi" even mean?

June 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

There always comes a point with languages where "why" becomes a pointless question. Some things just are the way they are. Heaven knows English is full of illogical expressions. We just mostly don't notice them.

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RossGee1
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Auwe! C'est la vie!

September 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/HentieTheart

What does Auwe mean?

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/faintsignal

I googled it. Apparently it is Hawaiian:

Auwe (ău-wē'), or aue, interj. 1. An exclamation of wonder, of surprise, of fear, of pity or affection, as oh!

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/prioart

So true. All languages have their own idiomatic expressions. In Italian a similar expression would be "Siamo a martedi", which translates to "We are at Tuesday".

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/VictoriaWeiss

In Mexico we often say something like “¿A qué estamos?", “Estamos a martes/veinte/etc.".

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/andre-nunes

The issue is that French like English can't distinguish between "ser" and "estar", it's the same verb for them

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/peterschei2

Je suis d'accord. Languages are often idiosyncratic. They are not like math or physics.

November 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/xbecenti15

It can be 'C'est mardi' (formal), 'on est' mardi, or "nous sommes mardi.' (both are informal) The reason why you don't say 'Il est' when expressing a date is just because you don't when expressing the date or month. 'C'est/On est/Nous sommes lundi' all mean 'It is Monday'. The only difference is the formality. 'C'est/On est/Nous sommes en janvier' all mean 'It is January'. The only difference between expressing a date and a season/month is that 'en' must be added before the season or month.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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The only difference between expressing a date and a season/month is that 'en' must be added before the season or month.

With the minor exception of spring. au printemps.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/M.Z.
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Thanks for all the replies. I had written this when DL's lessons used a "3 strike and you are out" rule, and I would always get the most random of phrases (case in point, see above) at the very end, when I had no hearts left. This new method is much less conducive to anger/frustration :)

If you have no idea what I am talking about, you are very lucky.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen880094

The entire discussion seems to be caught up in people wanting French to be English. It is our mother in some ways, but it is certainly not English. For that matter, although English is considered a Germanic language, it is surely not German. For one to learn French, one must be able to give up English to the extend that one accepts that it is ok for French not to be English. Look at the English term, "Good bye," whatt does that mean--but before one answers look at the French and German versons of "Good -bye," "Au revior," and "Auf wiedersehen." Both "mean" good bye in their respective languages, but both literally translate to something like, "see you later or see you again." If one wishes to learn French, put down the English dictionary and grammar, pick up the ones for French.

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NuriAndree

you are one wise owl

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen880094

You are nice, thanks.

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/wildswansatcoole

I agree that you have to start thinking the French way, not the English way. BUT . . . . . most English -speakers under the age of 60 - 65 seem never to have done English grammar in school. Most of them find it very difficult when an explanation discusses subject/object (who/whom - you and I /you and me), possessives etc etc

So I always recommend to people starting to learn Irish - "buy an English Grammar book, so that you'll understand the concepts in your own mother-tongue"

August 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/itagobon

i think it's just an idiomatic expression, it doesn't necessarily make sense from a logical point of view.

July 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen880094

I ma have overlooked it, but where does it say language is logical?

May 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DreA507350

I know! Wouldn't this mean like "we are tuesday" ??? No sense...

January 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
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November 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/srauf729

Thank you so much!

January 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Kusluck
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That's really helpful. I studied French 10 years ago, I didn't remember it. Thank you very much!

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/faintsignal

Interesting. That article states that phrases such as "C'est le quatre février" are valid but some Duolingo questions only accept the "we have" form.

November 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/libuska
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On est mardi. Its used more often. Nous sommes mardi is more formal. And i suppose it is something we need to learn.

September 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/atomicmrpelly

I like to imagine that the Yorkshire slang word "Mardy" (meaning grumpy) is also used in French, thus "Nous sommes mardi" means "We are grumpy" ... which means it must be Tuesday!!!

June 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Oxyte
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...That's actually how I read it!

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/taylor10864

From reading other comments I can see that mostly you say "nous sommes" whatever day it is in French. But if you were to say "c'est mardi" for example, would this be acceptable but just uncommon?

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariamemer

It is acceptable but it is formal. Nous sommes mardi/On est mardi are informal

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JaniceGladstone

Wow. I thought I would at least recognize an expression as commonly occurring as that would be. Is it really a way of saying "It is Tuesday?"

November 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

It's pretty much the way of saying "It is Tuesday".

March 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Saddam387152

I speak Arabic which is a sematic language, and this expression is acceptable with a slight difference "We are at Tuesday" but we also use "c'est mardi" so is it the same in French?

P.S. to English native speakers, calm down a little, you're learning a new language, cultures and tongues don't have to be English clones! Tolerance please :)

June 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/arthur0703
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How is it pronounced? Like nusom mardi or like nusomardi?

July 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I think you usually will hear it all run together.

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CoxySmith
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Re the male voice: he articulates every end vowel. I find it difficult to figure out what he is saying unless I slow him down. This sentence, for example, sounds like: "noosumma mardi"

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/milkaturtle

Why is it 'Nous sommes en juin' but 'Nous sommes mardi' ? Is it just the way it is or is there a rule applicable for more cases similar to this?

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Use en for month, year, season (except for spring which is au printemps just to mess with you)

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NishNish235

Do French Canadians say this or is this a Parisian thing?

March 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Adetayomi

When did 'nous sommes' become 'it is' I'm officially lost

February 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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This has been answered elsewhere on this page.

\\\\

Edit:

Much of the discussion on this topic has been removed so I will reintroduce it.

C'est/it is ....Monday.... assumes that there is an objective reality where it is Monday everywhere. Actually, it is not. It is a different day in some places.

Nous sommes/we are....Monday....reflects the fact that it is Monday from the point of view of the people in the conversation.

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert.Edward

Somebody wanting to know what day of the week a particular date was might ask 'What is the 18th?'. The answer might be 'It is Tuesday'. In that context, would 'Nous sommes mardi' be the correct French? If not, surely 'Today is Tuesday' should be accepted here.

October 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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For that, you would definitely use "c'est mardi".

April 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shanelle46650

why does "nous sommes mardi" translate to it's tuesday, instead of "we are tuesday?"

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CynthiaAra721919

"Nous sommes mardi" Translation: It is Tuesday. "Today is Tuesday" should be a correct answer.

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lea584371
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In german we always says something which would be translated as "we have tuesday". Yep. No sensemaking.

March 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Mary992728

...it must be Belgium.

November 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Pizzastorm
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ah

December 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Qiset1
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The previous example was "nous sommes en fevrier" which translated as "it is february" Why does one of these have the "en" and the other one doesn't?

January 20, 2019
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