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  5. "子どもはあめやおかしがすきです。"

"子どもはあめやおかしがすきです。"

Translation:Children like candies and treats.

June 15, 2017

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sara-aubrey

I feel like the English translation answer should reflect the use of や and say "Children like things like treats and candies."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haiw0n

I also answered in this way and wholly agree!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

Yes, it should, absolutely. That is the whole point of や in Japanese, "things like"....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael506383

Agree. Took me three reads to realize we were not talking about candy stores.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

子供は飴やお菓子が好きです


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jules40223

I like how the Kanji for candy 飴 refers to pedestal food - high up and away from the apetites of tiny kids.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leung39244

That is easier to read.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swallama

Not sure why we've been using 好き this whole time and now they use すき


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceForce

Difference between や and と for "and"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiritsuguZFC

と indicates that your list is exhaustive, i.e. you are mentioning everything.

や indicates that your list is not (necessarily) exhaustive, so it is more a "things like... and like...". Since children in general like more than just candies and treats, と would be a bit weird to use here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akoakini

and ya can be have nado at the end of the last word to say etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeowManian

You can also use とか, which is a less formal version of や. (You can think of とか as the "and" particle と plus the question particle か.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamanosou

Okashi should also translate as snacks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeraYagami

I was thinking the same. It marked me wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/No--One

It accepts it now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

Accepted as of jan1, 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loladesu

"Sweets" [UK/Ire] and "lollies" [Aus/NZ] need to be added as acceptable alternatives to "candy". No one really uses that word in the British English speaking word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loladesu

Why. Is. This. Still. Not. Fixed? : |


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

Wonder if it accepts bonbons


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BastTee

It's French! You use that word in English???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

"Children like sweets and sweets." For some reason this was marked as being wrong... xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

Children like boiled sweets and sweets.

It's a bit of a ridiculous sentence. Like saying: I like tea and hot drinks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edikan2

I am not used to snacks being referred to as treats. Maybe because in nigeria we NEVER call them that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

I'm not sure if the japanese english translation is exactly one yo one here. Okashi might means somewhere between treats and snacks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

It means 'sweets'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BastTee

No, it means sweet things but can be said for spicy things too. Basically, it's a little thing fast to eat, it's snacks and candies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lerosbif

True, though the overwhelming association with お菓子 is sweets. 'Confection' (i.e. primarily sugar/carb food) is probably the most accurate translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brettah31

"Lollies" should be accepted in place of "candies". Australian dialect English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BastTee

According to my Japanese friend, okashi contains ame (and other snacks) so this sentence doesn't really make sense. It's like saying you like lollipops and candies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZhaoZheng1

Why would "likes" be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceForce

"Children" is plural. As a result, In English subject-verb agreement, "to like" has to be in the third person plural form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

But this could mean "A child likes candy and sweets," no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boringjorn

Okashi and ame and neko and bataa. 好きな物のいくつかです。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.freed.2432

I believe "snacks" should also be accepted in place of "treats". In addition, I think 子ども is a word that is exclusively singular and needs たち to become plural, so the translation should be "a child/the child" instead of "children". Please correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimijimito

This question is way too open-ended to answer correctly on the first try if you've not encountered it in this app before..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

In one of the previous questions お菓子 was translated as "snack", which I found odd, because it's normally a candy, or a treat. Here it's a treat but not a snack. At a very minimum at least keep a consistent list of translations for the questions, especially in a single section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adezero

お菓子 isn't "treats". This sentence basically says "children like candy and candy", bad example by duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BastTee

It's right that treats may not be the right translation, but お菓子 doesn't mean candy alone but any snack, being salty or sweet one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heyber_molano

this exercise without kanjis is ridiculous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arilot

Shouldn't children be 子どもたち? I feel like こども refers to just one child


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EckoNis

I feel that the statement can also be translated as "Children like rain and snacks". While "candies" is better, it is not quite clear because there is no kanji.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

On the flip side though...

The kanji 飴 (あめ, "candy") isn't used so much. It's not in the list of the 2,136 jōyō kanji learnt in Japanese schools, nor is it even in the list of the 863 additional jinmeiyō kanji that can be used in names. 飴 isn't one of those 2,999 kanji.

Whereas 雨 (あめ, "rain") is one of the 80 kanji taught in the very first year of elementary school.

雨 is an N5 JLPT level kanji, which is the level this course is based around. Even for people studing for N1 (the highest JLPT level), 飴 usually still isn't listed as a kanji that should be learned.

So, I think あめ not being written in kanji is a very strong indicator that it's not going to mean "rain" 雨. And you can see why this course might not have gotten around to teaching the kanji 飴 or any of its rarer variants, since we haven't quite reached the point of having already learned 2,999 kanji yet. ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EckoNis

I see. That cleared up a lot for me. Thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/regularfanb0y

Children likes sweets and snacks not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

Children likes sweets and snacks.

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