1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Japanese
  4. >
  5. "ぎんこうにお金をかえしました。"

"ぎんこうにお金をかえしました。"

Translation:I returned money to the bank.

June 15, 2017

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claine15

Returned money to the bank??!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mzerrath

It's possible the speaker may have taken out a loan from the bank. Either that, or the speaker stole the money and felt guilty about stealing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/9hSF2
  • 1219

Accidently took more than needed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

I repaid the money to the bank was marked incorrect...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PliskinISS

Maybe it means make a deposit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro_42

強盗は銀行強盗を反省したでしょう。(The robber must have reflected on (felt remorse for) the bank robbery.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorbynJP

Yeah, you're still going to prison even if you return the money you stole...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasONN

It was just a "loan" (pending approval)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darthoctopus

銀行にお金を返しました


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ignat980

Why does the kanji for "bank" have the kanji for "to go"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWong9

行 is originally a "pictogram" (a stylized drawing of the object it represents)

The meaning was "to go" or "a road." Late in Chinese Tong dynasty, 行 was used to mean an area of clustered of similar professions or shops (derived from the meaning of road). So 銀行 was a profession of managing or trading "silver" - money used at that time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaynardHogg

Today's word is "polyphone," which came up in connection with a Mandarin dictionary app. The Duolingo course describes the issue quite early on, but doesn't name names. The bad news is that some 10% of Chinese characters are polyphonic, with two or more pronunciations. 行 is one, with two: xīng and sometimes hóng. Japanese has GYŌ, KŌ, AN, etc. Not to mention iku, yuku, and okonau.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

I'm pretty sure you mean hang2, not hong2.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/animatrix1490

Does this mean that you literally were returning (lost) money, or can this phrase be used to say you're depositing or paying back a loan?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drigoro2000

The polite robber strikes again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BraisedPorkBelly

さすが日本人ですね。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HessuHopo

侍(サムライ)の国(くに)ですね。


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izakayasebu

Find a penny, pick it up, return it to the bank and wish for luck. Then you'll find a penny... I don't think that's how the saying goes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conniepuce

"I gave back money to the bank" should also be a correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vlowolv

"I gave back the money to the bank." should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thorigrim

That darn murderous, bank-robbing, hat-selling dog may have had a change of heart after all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

Reverse Bonnie and Clyde


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillLamber1

his conscience must have gotten the better of him


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianWill829460

A bit off topic, but it used to be that when I got an answer wrong, I was prompted to try again. Now it just goes to the next question. Has this changed for anyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ichigotchi

Yep, it's returned to the old way, you'll get the incorrectly answered ones at the end again. I preferred it the other way tbh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

I think it's better to ask them at the end rather than asking again immediately. That way, it's testing more than just your recall of an answer shown to you on screen a second ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malbaFerre

It's very difficult for us to find out or divine who is the subject of the phrases without pronoms. why these lacks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nekojima

cause thats how japanese people talk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

Generally, the Japanese don't express what can be understood. The rule for comprehending is assume the subject in first, second, third person order, i.e., speaker (I), person addressed (you), someone else (who or which will be expressed in the sentence or understood from context).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John863934

I wasn't stealing something, I was breaking in to return something I stole!

Learn Japanese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.